Public sector strikes: East Lancashire workers on picket lines

Public sector strikes: East Lancashire workers on picket lines

STRIKE Protesters in Blackburn town centre this afternoon. Pic: Michelle Greaves

STRIKE Royal Blackburn Hospital workers

STRIKE Royal Blackburn Hospital workers

STRIKE Royal Blackburn Hospital workers

First published in Blackpool Lancashire Telegraph: Photograph of the Author by , Health reporter

20,000 public sector workers took part in demonstrations across East Lancashire today to protest over changes to their pensions.

A thousand of those marched noisily through Blackburn town centre this lunchtime amid a sea of flags, banners and placards, travelling to the beat of drums and the shrill of whistles and vuvuzelas.

For 45 minutes workers – some who had brought their children and even their pet dogs - converged outside Blackburn town hall in King William Street where union bosses whipped the crowd into a fervour.

“We’ve been shafted by pay freezes, shafted by job evaluations and now they’re trying to shaft us in our pensions. It’s one shaft too many”, said GMB representative Tim McDermott.

A chant of ‘Get your hands off our pension’ was started by members of the University and College Union, and NASUWT member Lesley Ham said the Government was “not only attacking public service workers but attacking those close to our hearts.”

Union officials estimate that over 95 per cent of schools and colleges were closed in East Lancashire, where 7,000 people work, and 50 per cent of hospital workers were on strike - a total of around 1,000 staff.

Most of the other members involved are employed in local government and in community health centres.

Unions are protesting against Government plans to make staff pay more and work longer to earn their pensions.

Tim Ellis, Unison officer for East Lancashire said: “It was a magnificent response to the day of action. It was uplifting and inspiring.

“It showed the determination of the ordinary people who maintain our public services not to have their pensions cut.”

He added: “The support from the public was continuous and vocally expressed. It undermined the government’s argument that the public wouldn’t support the dispute.”

In Blackburn with Darwen, public buildings remained open including markets and leisure centres, with the exception of Waves and Darwen Leisure Centre.

A skeleton bin collection service ran, but all libraries were closed.

Car and van drivers blew their horns in support of striking workers picketing outside the Royal Blackburn Hospital. Dozens of workers stood singing and chanting at both the staff entrance and main ambulance entrance.

In Burnley, the main council switchboard was closed and there was disruption to some services, but the St Peter’s Leisure Centre and Burnley Market ran as normal.

Outside Burnley police station, control room staff who answer 999 calls, crime scene investigators, PCSOs, criminal justice support staff and front counter workers formed a picket line, with some of them joined by their children.

Assistant secretary of the Lancashire police workers branch of UNISON, James Tattersall, stressed that members did not take strike action lightly.

“This is not a dispute against Lancashire Constabulary, it’s in protest at the Government’s plans to raise pension contributions by 50 per cent, while make us work longer for less.

“To strike is a last resort, I understand police officers are handling emergency calls and if there was a major incident we would return to work immediately.”

At Burnley General Hospital, approximately 100 strikers, including nurses, domestic staff and theatre technicians manned picket lines at four entrances.

Sharon Coulton, 57, a domestic worker at Burnley General Hospital for the last 14 years, said her retirement expectations had been drastically changed.

In Hyndburn, all council offices were closed, but bin collections were carried out as normal.

In Pendle, the markets remained open though Contact Pendle Centre, which includes Pendle Borough Council’s main switchboard, was closed. Staff were on standby to respond to emergency problems.

At Nelson and Colne College, 80 lecturers and other staff were on strike.

No teaching took place although the college remained open for students to use the library and other facilities.

In the Ribble Valley, no services were suspended, but some operated at a reduced level.

Rossendale Council’s offices were open as normal but household waste collections were prioritised and garden waste collections suspended.

A spokeswoman for the North West Ambulance Service (NWAS) said the service had been operating with a reduced workforce and there were less ambulances on the road than normal.

Although 999 calls were answered and responded to, it was thought some patients experienced a slightly delayed response.

The patient transport service only operated for patients who require urgent care.

Some less urgent procedures in East Lancashire hospitals were postponed as well as outpatient appointments for yesterday.

All magistrates courts in East Lancashire, including Blackburn, Burnley, Reedley and Hyndburn were open and operating as normal, as was Burnley Crown Court.

All job centres across Lancashire also remained open and benefits were issued as normal.

Jake Berry, MP for Rossendale and Darwen, condemned the strikes, calling them “outrageous and irresponsible”.

He said: “This was a prime example of the trade union movement riding roughshod not only over the wishes of the general public but also over their own membership. Only a quarter of union members voted for industrial action.”

He added: “These strikes have led to 27 schools in my constituency being closed which means that around 10,000 kids couldn’t go to school today. It has particularly affected single parent families.

“These strikes have caused huge disruption in the community and to many of our small businesses who are already struggling in these hard economic times.”

The day of action is the biggest of its kind for more than 30 years.

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Comments (59)

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10:51am Wed 30 Nov 11

Jack Herer says...

These people need to get in the real world.

Why should the majority of already hard done to, hard working people pay for someone else's grotesquely bloated pension?

It ain't fair people. We are skint as a country and you parasites want to continue to bleed everyone else dry. How are you any different than the bankers?

Stop being so selfish and get in the real world like everyone else, where the books have to balance and the finances have to stackup.
These people need to get in the real world. Why should the majority of already hard done to, hard working people pay for someone else's grotesquely bloated pension? It ain't fair people. We are skint as a country and you parasites want to continue to bleed everyone else dry. How are you any different than the bankers? Stop being so selfish and get in the real world like everyone else, where the books have to balance and the finances have to stackup. Jack Herer
  • Score: 0

11:05am Wed 30 Nov 11

DCI says...

These people (public sector workers) also pay taxes and are now facing years of near pay freeze. With inflation running so high this effectively means a sustained and brutal pay cut.

I'm not surprised some of the less enlightened private sector workers are falling for the Con-Dems ploy to divide and conquer by setting public sector against private sector. In REALITY, only the rich will be ammune from these cuts in living standards.

Do you really want a 68 year old paramedic extricating you from an upturned car, or our children taught by elderly teachers who are unable and frankly too knackered to control a classroom? Of course in reality this wont happen because these hard working professionals will be forced to retire on sick grounds well before that age (at greater expense to the taxpayer).
These people (public sector workers) also pay taxes and are now facing years of near pay freeze. With inflation running so high this effectively means a sustained and brutal pay cut. I'm not surprised some of the less enlightened private sector workers are falling for the Con-Dems ploy to divide and conquer by setting public sector against private sector. In REALITY, only the rich will be ammune from these cuts in living standards. Do you really want a 68 year old paramedic extricating you from an upturned car, or our children taught by elderly teachers who are unable and frankly too knackered to control a classroom? Of course in reality this wont happen because these hard working professionals will be forced to retire on sick grounds well before that age (at greater expense to the taxpayer). DCI
  • Score: 0

11:24am Wed 30 Nov 11

Twicki1 says...

Maybe these people want to join us in the real world, sorry we are not willing to pay for your gold plated pensions anymore. Pay rises are not a right and you are not doing us a favour teaching children, helping the sick or any other job you may do. You are doing the job you chose and are being paid to do, if you don't like it quit and get a job in the private sector and join the real world. The argument do you want a 68 year old paramedic or teacher are a joke, no course you don't just like in the private sector you don't want a 68 year old IT person or private nurse or private teacher but hey ho your gold plated pensions mean there is no choice get over it and move on!!!!!!!!11
Maybe these people want to join us in the real world, sorry we are not willing to pay for your gold plated pensions anymore. Pay rises are not a right and you are not doing us a favour teaching children, helping the sick or any other job you may do. You are doing the job you chose and are being paid to do, if you don't like it quit and get a job in the private sector and join the real world. The argument do you want a 68 year old paramedic or teacher are a joke, no course you don't just like in the private sector you don't want a 68 year old IT person or private nurse or private teacher but hey ho your gold plated pensions mean there is no choice get over it and move on!!!!!!!!11 Twicki1
  • Score: 0

11:27am Wed 30 Nov 11

BurnleyBorn&Bred says...

Jack Herer wrote:
These people need to get in the real world.

Why should the majority of already hard done to, hard working people pay for someone else's grotesquely bloated pension?

It ain't fair people. We are skint as a country and you parasites want to continue to bleed everyone else dry. How are you any different than the bankers?

Stop being so selfish and get in the real world like everyone else, where the books have to balance and the finances have to stackup.
What a load of drivel....it is you that needs to get in the real world,not everyone who works in the public sector are on inflated wages with grotesquely bloated pensions.

i would lay down my monthly pay slip in front of you along side your own and give you the choice of which you would prefer for the rest of your working life (that is if you are employed) and i can almost guarantee it would be your own you would pick up off the table.

some of us are on such a low income you would not believe ,and just a very small pension to look forward to when we retire .....if we live to see that day...

i struggle as it is from one payday to the next,i do not go out do not go away on holiday,i do not spend money stupidly,and just a very small pension to look forward to when we retire and this government are wanting to take an extra £37 a month from my pay for a pension with less benefit at retirement age.....if we live to see that day.

some people who are claiming benefits are better off than myself and part of my monthly pay goes to support them.........why should we not fight for our rights !
[quote][p][bold]Jack Herer[/bold] wrote: These people need to get in the real world. Why should the majority of already hard done to, hard working people pay for someone else's grotesquely bloated pension? It ain't fair people. We are skint as a country and you parasites want to continue to bleed everyone else dry. How are you any different than the bankers? Stop being so selfish and get in the real world like everyone else, where the books have to balance and the finances have to stackup.[/p][/quote]What a load of drivel....it is you that needs to get in the real world,not everyone who works in the public sector are on inflated wages with grotesquely bloated pensions. i would lay down my monthly pay slip in front of you along side your own and give you the choice of which you would prefer for the rest of your working life (that is if you are employed) and i can almost guarantee it would be your own you would pick up off the table. some of us are on such a low income you would not believe ,and just a very small pension to look forward to when we retire .....if we live to see that day... i struggle as it is from one payday to the next,i do not go out do not go away on holiday,i do not spend money stupidly,and just a very small pension to look forward to when we retire and this government are wanting to take an extra £37 a month from my pay for a pension with less benefit at retirement age.....if we live to see that day. some people who are claiming benefits are better off than myself and part of my monthly pay goes to support them.........why should we not fight for our rights ! BurnleyBorn&Bred
  • Score: 0

11:37am Wed 30 Nov 11

The Curator says...

JACK HERER

Some of your usual nonsense i see .

I have suggestion for you . Next time you are passing your local school ,why don't you pop in and call them "greedy selfish pigs " . Your words not mine from a previous post i noticed . Maybe you could also try this at the hospital or GP's surgery perhaps ,when you next need their help . You also could nip out next collection day and see how your bin men take to your "greedy selfish pigs " accusation .
Let us know how you get on please .
JACK HERER Some of your usual nonsense i see . I have suggestion for you . Next time you are passing your local school ,why don't you pop in and call them "greedy selfish pigs " . Your words not mine from a previous post i noticed . Maybe you could also try this at the hospital or GP's surgery perhaps ,when you next need their help . You also could nip out next collection day and see how your bin men take to your "greedy selfish pigs " accusation . Let us know how you get on please . The Curator
  • Score: 0

12:30pm Wed 30 Nov 11

Jack Herer says...

The Curator wrote:
JACK HERER

Some of your usual nonsense i see .

I have suggestion for you . Next time you are passing your local school ,why don't you pop in and call them "greedy selfish pigs " . Your words not mine from a previous post i noticed . Maybe you could also try this at the hospital or GP's surgery perhaps ,when you next need their help . You also could nip out next collection day and see how your bin men take to your "greedy selfish pigs " accusation .
Let us know how you get on please .
I'd love to be on a megaphone today. I'd gladly go round every single picket line to tell them all to their faces.

Someone needs to.
[quote][p][bold]The Curator[/bold] wrote: JACK HERER Some of your usual nonsense i see . I have suggestion for you . Next time you are passing your local school ,why don't you pop in and call them "greedy selfish pigs " . Your words not mine from a previous post i noticed . Maybe you could also try this at the hospital or GP's surgery perhaps ,when you next need their help . You also could nip out next collection day and see how your bin men take to your "greedy selfish pigs " accusation . Let us know how you get on please .[/p][/quote]I'd love to be on a megaphone today. I'd gladly go round every single picket line to tell them all to their faces. Someone needs to. Jack Herer
  • Score: 0

12:41pm Wed 30 Nov 11

Joseph Yossarian says...

If the unions were striking for something that they don't have that everybody else does, then they would have my support.

As it stands they have a better deal already than many of us could every hope for, so I'm sorry, but no, I don't support the strike action, and I fail to see why the unions think that they are entitled to more than the rest of us.

So, fight for your rights, absolutely right.

But if your rights are better than those of millions of others, then don't be too surprised if you don't have our support.

I don't think it's greed by the unions or their members. That would be way to strong a word. Perhaps a better realisation of what the pension benefits are for the rest of us would help with an understanding.

It's a shame really. I think it was a normal industrial dispute that unfortunately both the unions and the government are desperate to make political. That's not in the interests of anybody and will not help at all.

Hospital operations cancelled because of this.

Sympathy for the cause - yes, to a point.

Support for the strikes - NO. Sorry. But good luck anyway.
If the unions were striking for something that they don't have that everybody else does, then they would have my support. As it stands they have a better deal already than many of us could every hope for, so I'm sorry, but no, I don't support the strike action, and I fail to see why the unions think that they are entitled to more than the rest of us. So, fight for your rights, absolutely right. But if your rights are better than those of millions of others, then don't be too surprised if you don't have our support. I don't think it's greed by the unions or their members. That would be way to strong a word. Perhaps a better realisation of what the pension benefits are for the rest of us would help with an understanding. It's a shame really. I think it was a normal industrial dispute that unfortunately both the unions and the government are desperate to make political. That's not in the interests of anybody and will not help at all. Hospital operations cancelled because of this. Sympathy for the cause - yes, to a point. Support for the strikes - NO. Sorry. But good luck anyway. Joseph Yossarian
  • Score: 0

1:10pm Wed 30 Nov 11

hoppyhol says...

BurnleyBorn&Bred wrote:
Jack Herer wrote:
These people need to get in the real world.

Why should the majority of already hard done to, hard working people pay for someone else's grotesquely bloated pension?

It ain't fair people. We are skint as a country and you parasites want to continue to bleed everyone else dry. How are you any different than the bankers?

Stop being so selfish and get in the real world like everyone else, where the books have to balance and the finances have to stackup.
What a load of drivel....it is you that needs to get in the real world,not everyone who works in the public sector are on inflated wages with grotesquely bloated pensions.

i would lay down my monthly pay slip in front of you along side your own and give you the choice of which you would prefer for the rest of your working life (that is if you are employed) and i can almost guarantee it would be your own you would pick up off the table.

some of us are on such a low income you would not believe ,and just a very small pension to look forward to when we retire .....if we live to see that day...

i struggle as it is from one payday to the next,i do not go out do not go away on holiday,i do not spend money stupidly,and just a very small pension to look forward to when we retire and this government are wanting to take an extra £37 a month from my pay for a pension with less benefit at retirement age.....if we live to see that day.

some people who are claiming benefits are better off than myself and part of my monthly pay goes to support them.........why should we not fight for our rights !
Due to the national minimum wage your situation cannot be any different from any other 'low-paid' worker, except they do not have the luxury of an additional pension over and above the basic state pension that they receive. Unless they invest in a private pension themselves which again they would be no better off than Public Sector employees as the are open to the economic situation that every worker finds themselves in.

As much as I feel for your situation, it is a situation that needs addressing otherwise the majority of the working population will suffer at the expense of the minority.

I completely agree with your comments on the benefit situation and this too needs addressing asap.

Goodluck.
[quote][p][bold]BurnleyBorn&Bred[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Jack Herer[/bold] wrote: These people need to get in the real world. Why should the majority of already hard done to, hard working people pay for someone else's grotesquely bloated pension? It ain't fair people. We are skint as a country and you parasites want to continue to bleed everyone else dry. How are you any different than the bankers? Stop being so selfish and get in the real world like everyone else, where the books have to balance and the finances have to stackup.[/p][/quote]What a load of drivel....it is you that needs to get in the real world,not everyone who works in the public sector are on inflated wages with grotesquely bloated pensions. i would lay down my monthly pay slip in front of you along side your own and give you the choice of which you would prefer for the rest of your working life (that is if you are employed) and i can almost guarantee it would be your own you would pick up off the table. some of us are on such a low income you would not believe ,and just a very small pension to look forward to when we retire .....if we live to see that day... i struggle as it is from one payday to the next,i do not go out do not go away on holiday,i do not spend money stupidly,and just a very small pension to look forward to when we retire and this government are wanting to take an extra £37 a month from my pay for a pension with less benefit at retirement age.....if we live to see that day. some people who are claiming benefits are better off than myself and part of my monthly pay goes to support them.........why should we not fight for our rights ![/p][/quote]Due to the national minimum wage your situation cannot be any different from any other 'low-paid' worker, except they do not have the luxury of an additional pension over and above the basic state pension that they receive. Unless they invest in a private pension themselves which again they would be no better off than Public Sector employees as the are open to the economic situation that every worker finds themselves in. As much as I feel for your situation, it is a situation that needs addressing otherwise the majority of the working population will suffer at the expense of the minority. I completely agree with your comments on the benefit situation and this too needs addressing asap. Goodluck. hoppyhol
  • Score: 0

1:29pm Wed 30 Nov 11

bbgal says...

Public sector worker's pay a large chunk of their salary each month in pension contributions. This is not mandatory and they may choose if they wish to opt out and rely solely on state earning related pensions which is probably exactly what many of the objectors do. so by doing the sensible thing and planning for their retirement they have become fair game for the government to target as easy prey.
Where has the idea that all public sector workers are highly paid come from ?? many nurses would disagree and yes they have chosen a career to serve the public but i bet they did not expect to have to suffer the abuse which they are subjected to in the line of their work from some members of the public.
I am in total support for those hard working folk who are now fighting for their rights.
Public sector worker's pay a large chunk of their salary each month in pension contributions. This is not mandatory and they may choose if they wish to opt out and rely solely on state earning related pensions which is probably exactly what many of the objectors do. so by doing the sensible thing and planning for their retirement they have become fair game for the government to target as easy prey. Where has the idea that all public sector workers are highly paid come from ?? many nurses would disagree and yes they have chosen a career to serve the public but i bet they did not expect to have to suffer the abuse which they are subjected to in the line of their work from some members of the public. I am in total support for those hard working folk who are now fighting for their rights. bbgal
  • Score: 0

1:46pm Wed 30 Nov 11

Blackburn Realist says...

Jack Herer wrote:
The Curator wrote:
JACK HERER

Some of your usual nonsense i see .

I have suggestion for you . Next time you are passing your local school ,why don't you pop in and call them "greedy selfish pigs " . Your words not mine from a previous post i noticed . Maybe you could also try this at the hospital or GP's surgery perhaps ,when you next need their help . You also could nip out next collection day and see how your bin men take to your "greedy selfish pigs " accusation .
Let us know how you get on please .
I'd love to be on a megaphone today. I'd gladly go round every single picket line to tell them all to their faces.

Someone needs to.
Jealous little hater! Regardless of whether you think it wrong or right that the public sector workers get a "gold plated" pension or not,the fact is they should get what they signed up for. It's wrong and immoral that this government want to take away what is rightfully theirs. You go to the picket lines and have your say and I guarantee you would be put right and hopefully have some of your ignorance knocked out of you.
[quote][p][bold]Jack Herer[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]The Curator[/bold] wrote: JACK HERER Some of your usual nonsense i see . I have suggestion for you . Next time you are passing your local school ,why don't you pop in and call them "greedy selfish pigs " . Your words not mine from a previous post i noticed . Maybe you could also try this at the hospital or GP's surgery perhaps ,when you next need their help . You also could nip out next collection day and see how your bin men take to your "greedy selfish pigs " accusation . Let us know how you get on please .[/p][/quote]I'd love to be on a megaphone today. I'd gladly go round every single picket line to tell them all to their faces. Someone needs to.[/p][/quote]Jealous little hater! Regardless of whether you think it wrong or right that the public sector workers get a "gold plated" pension or not,the fact is they should get what they signed up for. It's wrong and immoral that this government want to take away what is rightfully theirs. You go to the picket lines and have your say and I guarantee you would be put right and hopefully have some of your ignorance knocked out of you. Blackburn Realist
  • Score: 0

1:56pm Wed 30 Nov 11

j bee says...

BurnleyBorn&Bred wrote:
Jack Herer wrote: These people need to get in the real world. Why should the majority of already hard done to, hard working people pay for someone else's grotesquely bloated pension? It ain't fair people. We are skint as a country and you parasites want to continue to bleed everyone else dry. How are you any different than the bankers? Stop being so selfish and get in the real world like everyone else, where the books have to balance and the finances have to stackup.
What a load of drivel....it is you that needs to get in the real world,not everyone who works in the public sector are on inflated wages with grotesquely bloated pensions. i would lay down my monthly pay slip in front of you along side your own and give you the choice of which you would prefer for the rest of your working life (that is if you are employed) and i can almost guarantee it would be your own you would pick up off the table. some of us are on such a low income you would not believe ,and just a very small pension to look forward to when we retire .....if we live to see that day... i struggle as it is from one payday to the next,i do not go out do not go away on holiday,i do not spend money stupidly,and just a very small pension to look forward to when we retire and this government are wanting to take an extra £37 a month from my pay for a pension with less benefit at retirement age.....if we live to see that day. some people who are claiming benefits are better off than myself and part of my monthly pay goes to support them.........why should we not fight for our rights !
i am not against anything you get but i dont want a penny of my tax paying money going to anybody else , which is wrong all the rest of the country just get a state pension which you get also
[quote][p][bold]BurnleyBorn&Bred[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Jack Herer[/bold] wrote: These people need to get in the real world. Why should the majority of already hard done to, hard working people pay for someone else's grotesquely bloated pension? It ain't fair people. We are skint as a country and you parasites want to continue to bleed everyone else dry. How are you any different than the bankers? Stop being so selfish and get in the real world like everyone else, where the books have to balance and the finances have to stackup.[/p][/quote]What a load of drivel....it is you that needs to get in the real world,not everyone who works in the public sector are on inflated wages with grotesquely bloated pensions. i would lay down my monthly pay slip in front of you along side your own and give you the choice of which you would prefer for the rest of your working life (that is if you are employed) and i can almost guarantee it would be your own you would pick up off the table. some of us are on such a low income you would not believe ,and just a very small pension to look forward to when we retire .....if we live to see that day... i struggle as it is from one payday to the next,i do not go out do not go away on holiday,i do not spend money stupidly,and just a very small pension to look forward to when we retire and this government are wanting to take an extra £37 a month from my pay for a pension with less benefit at retirement age.....if we live to see that day. some people who are claiming benefits are better off than myself and part of my monthly pay goes to support them.........why should we not fight for our rights ![/p][/quote]i am not against anything you get but i dont want a penny of my tax paying money going to anybody else , which is wrong all the rest of the country just get a state pension which you get also j bee
  • Score: 0

2:05pm Wed 30 Nov 11

Hopping mad says...

Are you employed Mr Herer? Just out of interest! Just for the record, public sector workers are NOT on gold plated pensions and I do not know where you ignorant people get this from! Its the government that are on gold plated pensions and we as public sector workers signed a contract and have paid into our pensions from our own hard earned wages, its not a free pension that is given to us. We pay into it so have the right to have what we have paid! Stop being ignorant and stop to think about that.
Are you employed Mr Herer? Just out of interest! Just for the record, public sector workers are NOT on gold plated pensions and I do not know where you ignorant people get this from! Its the government that are on gold plated pensions and we as public sector workers signed a contract and have paid into our pensions from our own hard earned wages, its not a free pension that is given to us. We pay into it so have the right to have what we have paid! Stop being ignorant and stop to think about that. Hopping mad
  • Score: 0

2:15pm Wed 30 Nov 11

Your ferret stinks says...

Blackburn Realist wrote:
Jack Herer wrote:
The Curator wrote: JACK HERER Some of your usual nonsense i see . I have suggestion for you . Next time you are passing your local school ,why don't you pop in and call them "greedy selfish pigs " . Your words not mine from a previous post i noticed . Maybe you could also try this at the hospital or GP's surgery perhaps ,when you next need their help . You also could nip out next collection day and see how your bin men take to your "greedy selfish pigs " accusation . Let us know how you get on please .
I'd love to be on a megaphone today. I'd gladly go round every single picket line to tell them all to their faces. Someone needs to.
Jealous little hater! Regardless of whether you think it wrong or right that the public sector workers get a "gold plated" pension or not,the fact is they should get what they signed up for. It's wrong and immoral that this government want to take away what is rightfully theirs. You go to the picket lines and have your say and I guarantee you would be put right and hopefully have some of your ignorance knocked out of you.
Well said BR, unfortunately no matter how hard you try it's a fact that sometimes you can't educate pork!
[quote][p][bold]Blackburn Realist[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Jack Herer[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]The Curator[/bold] wrote: JACK HERER Some of your usual nonsense i see . I have suggestion for you . Next time you are passing your local school ,why don't you pop in and call them "greedy selfish pigs " . Your words not mine from a previous post i noticed . Maybe you could also try this at the hospital or GP's surgery perhaps ,when you next need their help . You also could nip out next collection day and see how your bin men take to your "greedy selfish pigs " accusation . Let us know how you get on please .[/p][/quote]I'd love to be on a megaphone today. I'd gladly go round every single picket line to tell them all to their faces. Someone needs to.[/p][/quote]Jealous little hater! Regardless of whether you think it wrong or right that the public sector workers get a "gold plated" pension or not,the fact is they should get what they signed up for. It's wrong and immoral that this government want to take away what is rightfully theirs. You go to the picket lines and have your say and I guarantee you would be put right and hopefully have some of your ignorance knocked out of you.[/p][/quote]Well said BR, unfortunately no matter how hard you try it's a fact that sometimes you can't educate pork! Your ferret stinks
  • Score: 0

2:46pm Wed 30 Nov 11

Hopping mad says...

This country will be on its knees if the members of these public sector pensions decided to withdraw. Governments past and present has dipped into these pots to pay for projects like infrastructure and the like. So I would say be careful what you wish for Mr Camoron and Mr Maude.

By the way I don't see anyone looking at what pensions our MP's get, well let me tell you. Mr Cameron gets a pension of 33000 pa and Mr Maude gets 43000 paid for by the taxpayer. Mr Cameron is on 142,000 per year and Mr Maude is on 134,000. I don't know what Mr Cameron is worth but you could guess, but Mr Maude is worth 3.3m and both get 21 weeks holiday a year and MP's expenses.

My pension is worth just over 3000 per year that I guarantee I will have paid for it.

As for you ferret stinks, as for education maybe you should have gone to school and reaped the benefits of the public sector or was you just pig headed?
This country will be on its knees if the members of these public sector pensions decided to withdraw. Governments past and present has dipped into these pots to pay for projects like infrastructure and the like. So I would say be careful what you wish for Mr Camoron and Mr Maude. By the way I don't see anyone looking at what pensions our MP's get, well let me tell you. Mr Cameron gets a pension of 33000 pa and Mr Maude gets 43000 paid for by the taxpayer. Mr Cameron is on 142,000 per year and Mr Maude is on 134,000. I don't know what Mr Cameron is worth but you could guess, but Mr Maude is worth 3.3m and both get 21 weeks holiday a year and MP's expenses. My pension is worth just over 3000 per year that I guarantee I will have paid for it. As for you ferret stinks, as for education maybe you should have gone to school and reaped the benefits of the public sector or was you just pig headed? Hopping mad
  • Score: 0

3:22pm Wed 30 Nov 11

Rosie's mum says...

The NHS scheme has a 2 BILLION pound surplus each and every year. This money just disappears into the treasury. Then the government complains when it has to fulfil its obligation!! Even when they are in this surplus.
If you all went to the bank/building society and it refused to give you the deposit and interest you had signed up for, you would rightly complain and have legal recourse. Public servants are not asking for more, they just want what was agreed when they signed their contracts.
The NHS scheme has a 2 BILLION pound surplus each and every year. This money just disappears into the treasury. Then the government complains when it has to fulfil its obligation!! Even when they are in this surplus. If you all went to the bank/building society and it refused to give you the deposit and interest you had signed up for, you would rightly complain and have legal recourse. Public servants are not asking for more, they just want what was agreed when they signed their contracts. Rosie's mum
  • Score: 0

4:06pm Wed 30 Nov 11

dodgyjohn says...

how many of these public sector workers think that they could get a new job in the private sector with a simliar or better pension provison.
join the rest of us in the real world, if you don't like the new pension terms resign and change your job,,,,
how many of these public sector workers think that they could get a new job in the private sector with a simliar or better pension provison. join the rest of us in the real world, if you don't like the new pension terms resign and change your job,,,, dodgyjohn
  • Score: 0

4:07pm Wed 30 Nov 11

Joseph Yossarian says...

"""The NHS scheme has a 2 BILLION pound surplus each and every year. This money just disappears into the treasury."""

The NHS fund is currently in a surplus. In no way does that mean it will be in a surplus in the future.

Company defined benefit schemes had a similar problem. They had big surpluses. Then look what happened. Not many of them now survive.

So perhaps a few lessons can be learned from the experience of others.

This whole "I just want was I was promised" approach risks vastly oversimplifying the issue. Countless people used to have final salary schemes that don't anymore. Very few that I know have any real idea of what their pension will be.

Jobs - and their terms and conditions - are not for life. Conditions change.

Unfortunately, the unions don't seem to get it, and the government is trying to get as much political capital as possible. It's a very bad combination.

Of course I have sympathy. People are being told they have to work longer for less result. It seems unfair.
But.....Same thing happened to me (and millions of others) years ago. The public sector is simply catching up. Public sector always takes longer to react. Nothing intrinsically wrong with that.

Sympathy - yes. Wish you luck - yes.
Support you in having something that I lost ages ago? Sorry...

Strikers please remember that you are fighting to maintain "rights" that many of us lost long ago. Feel free to fight for them, but please do not vilify those of us who do not have these rights and please don't rise to comments calling you greedy or other ridiculous insults.

....................
...
ps if you want greedy, have a look at Derek Simpson of UNITE. His "golden goodbye" was over £500,000 (according to private-eye admittedly!)

If I was a unite member, I'd be a bit miffed at where my subs had gone.
"""The NHS scheme has a 2 BILLION pound surplus each and every year. This money just disappears into the treasury.""" The NHS fund is currently in a surplus. In no way does that mean it will be in a surplus in the future. Company defined benefit schemes had a similar problem. They had big surpluses. Then look what happened. Not many of them now survive. So perhaps a few lessons can be learned from the experience of others. This whole "I just want was I was promised" approach risks vastly oversimplifying the issue. Countless people used to have final salary schemes that don't anymore. Very few that I know have any real idea of what their pension will be. Jobs - and their terms and conditions - are not for life. Conditions change. Unfortunately, the unions don't seem to get it, and the government is trying to get as much political capital as possible. It's a very bad combination. Of course I have sympathy. People are being told they have to work longer for less result. It seems unfair. But.....Same thing happened to me (and millions of others) years ago. The public sector is simply catching up. Public sector always takes longer to react. Nothing intrinsically wrong with that. Sympathy - yes. Wish you luck - yes. Support you in having something that I lost ages ago? Sorry... Strikers please remember that you are fighting to maintain "rights" that many of us lost long ago. Feel free to fight for them, but please do not vilify those of us who do not have these rights and please don't rise to comments calling you greedy or other ridiculous insults. .................... ... ps if you want greedy, have a look at Derek Simpson of UNITE. His "golden goodbye" was over £500,000 (according to private-eye admittedly!) If I was a unite member, I'd be a bit miffed at where my subs had gone. Joseph Yossarian
  • Score: 0

4:51pm Wed 30 Nov 11

julespent says...

In response to comments.
If people were treated fairly then there would be no need for unions.
Some people are forgetting, public sector workers are taxpayers too! What is their tax paying for, Olympic tickets for cameron and his cronies who can well afford to pay for their own.
Public sector workers pay into their pension schemes.
After working for 50 years if this government get their way i will get less than £100 per week when i retire.(gold plated???) Guess that makes me greedy. But greedy is wanting more, I dont want more, i just dont want less.
We should all be suporting each other whoever you are as all us hard working taxpayers deserve a decent pension when we retire. Not end up claiming benefits. Decent pensions for everyone.
In response to comments. If people were treated fairly then there would be no need for unions. Some people are forgetting, public sector workers are taxpayers too! What is their tax paying for, Olympic tickets for cameron and his cronies who can well afford to pay for their own. Public sector workers pay into their pension schemes. After working for 50 years if this government get their way i will get less than £100 per week when i retire.(gold plated???) Guess that makes me greedy. But greedy is wanting more, I dont want more, i just dont want less. We should all be suporting each other whoever you are as all us hard working taxpayers deserve a decent pension when we retire. Not end up claiming benefits. Decent pensions for everyone. julespent
  • Score: 0

5:10pm Wed 30 Nov 11

Lifeinthemix says...

well done to all who turned out in Blackburn and Preston, it is good to see people are not happy with the state of the nation, I hope you recieved our leaflet and hope it helps...

https://www.lifeinth
emix.info/2011/11/pr
ofile-ark-absolute-r
eturn-kids/
well done to all who turned out in Blackburn and Preston, it is good to see people are not happy with the state of the nation, I hope you recieved our leaflet and hope it helps... https://www.lifeinth emix.info/2011/11/pr ofile-ark-absolute-r eturn-kids/ Lifeinthemix
  • Score: 0

5:40pm Wed 30 Nov 11

Michael@ClitheroeSince58 says...

Thanks for emptying my bins lads, It's the only exciting thing in my working week and I would have been deeply disappointed if this major even in my working week had not gone to plan lol
Thanks for emptying my bins lads, It's the only exciting thing in my working week and I would have been deeply disappointed if this major even in my working week had not gone to plan lol Michael@ClitheroeSince58
  • Score: 0

5:58pm Wed 30 Nov 11

oldblue says...

Public sector workers do the job they chose to for practical, not altruistic, reasons. Certainly the country would grind to a halt if they stopped working, but it also would if the private sector stopped working. The implication that private sector workers are somehow more noble than the rest of us is arrant nonsense. The country is broke, we cannot afford to continue paying gold plated (ie index linked) pensions at such generous levels to one section of the population out of the taxes imposed on the other half of the population who do not enjoy such generous terms. MP's salaries and pensions are certainly too generous but to lump them into the argument is a red herring. The real world for most of us in the private sector has been wage freezes for the past several years and annuity pensions that pay the same today as they will the day we die. Time to share the pain.
Public sector workers do the job they chose to for practical, not altruistic, reasons. Certainly the country would grind to a halt if they stopped working, but it also would if the private sector stopped working. The implication that private sector workers are somehow more noble than the rest of us is arrant nonsense. The country is broke, we cannot afford to continue paying gold plated (ie index linked) pensions at such generous levels to one section of the population out of the taxes imposed on the other half of the population who do not enjoy such generous terms. MP's salaries and pensions are certainly too generous but to lump them into the argument is a red herring. The real world for most of us in the private sector has been wage freezes for the past several years and annuity pensions that pay the same today as they will the day we die. Time to share the pain. oldblue
  • Score: 0

5:59pm Wed 30 Nov 11

Keep Darwen Green says...

BurnleyBorn&Bred wrote:
Jack Herer wrote:
These people need to get in the real world.

Why should the majority of already hard done to, hard working people pay for someone else's grotesquely bloated pension?

It ain't fair people. We are skint as a country and you parasites want to continue to bleed everyone else dry. How are you any different than the bankers?

Stop being so selfish and get in the real world like everyone else, where the books have to balance and the finances have to stackup.
What a load of drivel....it is you that needs to get in the real world,not everyone who works in the public sector are on inflated wages with grotesquely bloated pensions.

i would lay down my monthly pay slip in front of you along side your own and give you the choice of which you would prefer for the rest of your working life (that is if you are employed) and i can almost guarantee it would be your own you would pick up off the table.

some of us are on such a low income you would not believe ,and just a very small pension to look forward to when we retire .....if we live to see that day...

i struggle as it is from one payday to the next,i do not go out do not go away on holiday,i do not spend money stupidly,and just a very small pension to look forward to when we retire and this government are wanting to take an extra £37 a month from my pay for a pension with less benefit at retirement age.....if we live to see that day.

some people who are claiming benefits are better off than myself and part of my monthly pay goes to support them.........why should we not fight for our rights !
Well said, I work in the private sector and can see the way the conservative party is trying to get private sector tax payers to turn on the public sector.
No way, why should I be so small minded if someone has a better pension deal than me. I say good on you.
Camerons broken Britain, the one he was fixing, was last seen in a laybye off the M62 on four piles of bricks. Its now been mended beyond repair. I expect Camerons "damp squib" to get a lot worse. Just remember, you get what you vote for.
[quote][p][bold]BurnleyBorn&Bred[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Jack Herer[/bold] wrote: These people need to get in the real world. Why should the majority of already hard done to, hard working people pay for someone else's grotesquely bloated pension? It ain't fair people. We are skint as a country and you parasites want to continue to bleed everyone else dry. How are you any different than the bankers? Stop being so selfish and get in the real world like everyone else, where the books have to balance and the finances have to stackup.[/p][/quote]What a load of drivel....it is you that needs to get in the real world,not everyone who works in the public sector are on inflated wages with grotesquely bloated pensions. i would lay down my monthly pay slip in front of you along side your own and give you the choice of which you would prefer for the rest of your working life (that is if you are employed) and i can almost guarantee it would be your own you would pick up off the table. some of us are on such a low income you would not believe ,and just a very small pension to look forward to when we retire .....if we live to see that day... i struggle as it is from one payday to the next,i do not go out do not go away on holiday,i do not spend money stupidly,and just a very small pension to look forward to when we retire and this government are wanting to take an extra £37 a month from my pay for a pension with less benefit at retirement age.....if we live to see that day. some people who are claiming benefits are better off than myself and part of my monthly pay goes to support them.........why should we not fight for our rights ![/p][/quote]Well said, I work in the private sector and can see the way the conservative party is trying to get private sector tax payers to turn on the public sector. No way, why should I be so small minded if someone has a better pension deal than me. I say good on you. Camerons broken Britain, the one he was fixing, was last seen in a laybye off the M62 on four piles of bricks. Its now been mended beyond repair. I expect Camerons "damp squib" to get a lot worse. Just remember, you get what you vote for. Keep Darwen Green
  • Score: 0

6:29pm Wed 30 Nov 11

Chris P Bacon says...

Jack Herer wrote:
These people need to get in the real world.

Why should the majority of already hard done to, hard working people pay for someone else's grotesquely bloated pension?

It ain't fair people. We are skint as a country and you parasites want to continue to bleed everyone else dry. How are you any different than the bankers?

Stop being so selfish and get in the real world like everyone else, where the books have to balance and the finances have to stackup.
And we're off! Jack Herer takes the lead in the stupid stakes and though there are a few on here who run him close, he's going to win this strike one uncontested.

'The people need to get in the real world'! You wouldn't know the real world if one day we were faced with the tragedy of you waking up in it.

'We are skint as a country'! We are one of the wealthiest countries in the history of the whole world and you bleat about the guff you believe from the loonies running the asylum!

You've lost this one as surely as Steve Kean has lost the confidence of those who support the team he has the misfortune to manage.
[quote][p][bold]Jack Herer[/bold] wrote: These people need to get in the real world. Why should the majority of already hard done to, hard working people pay for someone else's grotesquely bloated pension? It ain't fair people. We are skint as a country and you parasites want to continue to bleed everyone else dry. How are you any different than the bankers? Stop being so selfish and get in the real world like everyone else, where the books have to balance and the finances have to stackup.[/p][/quote]And we're off! Jack Herer takes the lead in the stupid stakes and though there are a few on here who run him close, he's going to win this strike one uncontested. 'The people need to get in the real world'! You wouldn't know the real world if one day we were faced with the tragedy of you waking up in it. 'We are skint as a country'! We are one of the wealthiest countries in the history of the whole world and you bleat about the guff you believe from the loonies running the asylum! You've lost this one as surely as Steve Kean has lost the confidence of those who support the team he has the misfortune to manage. Chris P Bacon
  • Score: 0

6:43pm Wed 30 Nov 11

Lifeinthemix says...

bacon perhaps you should educate yourself before typing on here.

we the people pay the treasury £468.9 billion every year, we are not skint.

succesive governments since the second world war have built up a social system in order they can merge with under the corporate script. our money is being mismanaged by handing over our civil system to the corporate interests, who then dictate to the civil.

its nothing new its called fascism.

grow up son your constant aggressive response to people who care, is wearing very thin...

Charities pay zero tax and in case you have not noted, they are administering our civil system as subsidiaries of the big corporate bods such as Serco, Ingeous Deloitte (pricewaterhousecoop
ers), A4e amongst others.

the corporations pay zero tax because they ensure they carry massive debt.

the taxpayer is paying the interest of the corporations which is increasing thus we get less service from the outsource providers as the contract costs rise to pay the increasing corporate debt.

don't bother replying...you couldn't if you tried the rest of your angry little life.
bacon perhaps you should educate yourself before typing on here. we the people pay the treasury £468.9 billion every year, we are not skint. succesive governments since the second world war have built up a social system in order they can merge with under the corporate script. our money is being mismanaged by handing over our civil system to the corporate interests, who then dictate to the civil. its nothing new its called fascism. grow up son your constant aggressive response to people who care, is wearing very thin... Charities pay zero tax and in case you have not noted, they are administering our civil system as subsidiaries of the big corporate bods such as Serco, Ingeous Deloitte (pricewaterhousecoop ers), A4e amongst others. the corporations pay zero tax because they ensure they carry massive debt. the taxpayer is paying the interest of the corporations which is increasing thus we get less service from the outsource providers as the contract costs rise to pay the increasing corporate debt. don't bother replying...you couldn't if you tried the rest of your angry little life. Lifeinthemix
  • Score: 0

7:03pm Wed 30 Nov 11

Noiticer says...

This Government is rapidly turning into the worst for a generation or more. It is run by relatively young, affluent, arrogant, uncaring, inexperienced but savvy, smooth-tongued public relations' spinners who are rapidly revealing the Tory Party as once again the nasty party which is determined to reduce the average person to being a subservient servant with few employment rights, on the lowest wage possible and so passive as to let them walk over them just as it was in Victorian times and in the early 20th century. The last resistance to their plan are the public servants well unionised and prepared to some extent to fight back. If they fail the Tories will be jumping for glee as Cameron is already reportedly beginning to do.
Make no mistake, the country is being run by a bunch of very right wing and cunning politicians ready to advance the rich and corporate bodies who are their backers. If they succeed the social progress made since 1945, when our fathers and mothers had fought a war against fascism and to make the UK a better place than it was in 1939, will be completely wiped out and we will all be losers in so many ways.
This Government is rapidly turning into the worst for a generation or more. It is run by relatively young, affluent, arrogant, uncaring, inexperienced but savvy, smooth-tongued public relations' spinners who are rapidly revealing the Tory Party as once again the nasty party which is determined to reduce the average person to being a subservient servant with few employment rights, on the lowest wage possible and so passive as to let them walk over them just as it was in Victorian times and in the early 20th century. The last resistance to their plan are the public servants well unionised and prepared to some extent to fight back. If they fail the Tories will be jumping for glee as Cameron is already reportedly beginning to do. Make no mistake, the country is being run by a bunch of very right wing and cunning politicians ready to advance the rich and corporate bodies who are their backers. If they succeed the social progress made since 1945, when our fathers and mothers had fought a war against fascism and to make the UK a better place than it was in 1939, will be completely wiped out and we will all be losers in so many ways. Noiticer
  • Score: 0

7:09pm Wed 30 Nov 11

Chris P Bacon says...

Lifeinthemix wrote:
bacon perhaps you should educate yourself before typing on here.

we the people pay the treasury £468.9 billion every year, we are not skint.

succesive governments since the second world war have built up a social system in order they can merge with under the corporate script. our money is being mismanaged by handing over our civil system to the corporate interests, who then dictate to the civil.

its nothing new its called fascism.

grow up son your constant aggressive response to people who care, is wearing very thin...

Charities pay zero tax and in case you have not noted, they are administering our civil system as subsidiaries of the big corporate bods such as Serco, Ingeous Deloitte (pricewaterhousecoop

ers), A4e amongst others.

the corporations pay zero tax because they ensure they carry massive debt.

the taxpayer is paying the interest of the corporations which is increasing thus we get less service from the outsource providers as the contract costs rise to pay the increasing corporate debt.

don't bother replying...you couldn't if you tried the rest of your angry little life.
And perhaps you should have read the post rather than attacking what you THINK I wrote.

That was to point out the fallacy of Jack Herer claiming we were skint. I know we're not.

And to NOT reply to the sort of idiocy you infest this board, and You Tube with, would be to stand by and do nothing about the iniquities and inadequacies foisted onto this world. Not the one you live in, I mean the actual one.
[quote][p][bold]Lifeinthemix[/bold] wrote: bacon perhaps you should educate yourself before typing on here. we the people pay the treasury £468.9 billion every year, we are not skint. succesive governments since the second world war have built up a social system in order they can merge with under the corporate script. our money is being mismanaged by handing over our civil system to the corporate interests, who then dictate to the civil. its nothing new its called fascism. grow up son your constant aggressive response to people who care, is wearing very thin... Charities pay zero tax and in case you have not noted, they are administering our civil system as subsidiaries of the big corporate bods such as Serco, Ingeous Deloitte (pricewaterhousecoop ers), A4e amongst others. the corporations pay zero tax because they ensure they carry massive debt. the taxpayer is paying the interest of the corporations which is increasing thus we get less service from the outsource providers as the contract costs rise to pay the increasing corporate debt. don't bother replying...you couldn't if you tried the rest of your angry little life.[/p][/quote]And perhaps you should have read the post rather than attacking what you THINK I wrote. That was to point out the fallacy of Jack Herer claiming we were skint. I know we're not. And to NOT reply to the sort of idiocy you infest this board, and You Tube with, would be to stand by and do nothing about the iniquities and inadequacies foisted onto this world. Not the one you live in, I mean the actual one. Chris P Bacon
  • Score: 0

7:33pm Wed 30 Nov 11

'Kean on getting out..! says...

Noiticer wrote:
This Government is rapidly turning into the worst for a generation or more. It is run by relatively young, affluent, arrogant, uncaring, inexperienced but savvy, smooth-tongued public relations' spinners who are rapidly revealing the Tory Party as once again the nasty party which is determined to reduce the average person to being a subservient servant with few employment rights, on the lowest wage possible and so passive as to let them walk over them just as it was in Victorian times and in the early 20th century. The last resistance to their plan are the public servants well unionised and prepared to some extent to fight back. If they fail the Tories will be jumping for glee as Cameron is already reportedly beginning to do.
Make no mistake, the country is being run by a bunch of very right wing and cunning politicians ready to advance the rich and corporate bodies who are their backers. If they succeed the social progress made since 1945, when our fathers and mothers had fought a war against fascism and to make the UK a better place than it was in 1939, will be completely wiped out and we will all be losers in so many ways.
I had to cross a picket line this morning and it was very intimidating with all the shouting and jeering at innocent patients walking by.The nurses who could be bothered today had to make me some tea and toast to settle my nerves after all the upset the strikers did.It was horrific I'm still a bit upset so one of the nurses has had to bring me home via an exit away from those hooligans.
She's ever so helpfull...and kean.
[quote][p][bold]Noiticer[/bold] wrote: This Government is rapidly turning into the worst for a generation or more. It is run by relatively young, affluent, arrogant, uncaring, inexperienced but savvy, smooth-tongued public relations' spinners who are rapidly revealing the Tory Party as once again the nasty party which is determined to reduce the average person to being a subservient servant with few employment rights, on the lowest wage possible and so passive as to let them walk over them just as it was in Victorian times and in the early 20th century. The last resistance to their plan are the public servants well unionised and prepared to some extent to fight back. If they fail the Tories will be jumping for glee as Cameron is already reportedly beginning to do. Make no mistake, the country is being run by a bunch of very right wing and cunning politicians ready to advance the rich and corporate bodies who are their backers. If they succeed the social progress made since 1945, when our fathers and mothers had fought a war against fascism and to make the UK a better place than it was in 1939, will be completely wiped out and we will all be losers in so many ways.[/p][/quote]I had to cross a picket line this morning and it was very intimidating with all the shouting and jeering at innocent patients walking by.The nurses who could be bothered today had to make me some tea and toast to settle my nerves after all the upset the strikers did.It was horrific I'm still a bit upset so one of the nurses has had to bring me home via an exit away from those hooligans. She's ever so helpfull...and kean. 'Kean on getting out..!
  • Score: 0

7:42pm Wed 30 Nov 11

not too old to care says...

Why don't the Private Sector now go on strike because they are being made to pay not just for their own inferior pension but also for someone else's superior pension. I don't hear any union asking for a ballot -- Do you????
Why don't the Private Sector now go on strike because they are being made to pay not just for their own inferior pension but also for someone else's superior pension. I don't hear any union asking for a ballot -- Do you???? not too old to care
  • Score: 0

7:45pm Wed 30 Nov 11

Monotoni says...

Monotoni says...
2:56pm Wed 30 Nov 11
Needless to say a great deal of ill-informed venom is being directed at public sector workers mainly through jealousy.
I am a teacher, on strike for the first time in 40 years. When I accepted my first post the remuneration included a salary and a pension to which I had to contribute a fixed percentage of my salary. That was the deal. I am still doing the same job, in the classroom, paying the same fixed rate on my (now higher) salary.
Once my daughter grew up I consulted (for the first time) a financial adviser to make some tentative plans for retirement. He told me that, if I had contracted to pay my pension contributions into a scheme and guaranteed not to touch it for 40 years I would be getting a pension 3 times greater than the one I would get now.
The governments have simply put our contributions into the general finances and the latest lot are seeking to renege on their side of the bargain. By all means change the system for new entrants - thet will then be able to decide whether the 'package' they are being offered is attractive or not.
As for students being disadvantaged - get real; we will still have to catch up the work as specified by the syllabus prior to exams in January or May - often in our own lunchtimes, non-contact periods etc. Do you really think we'd let our students.
And one last thought: no doubt those of you who haven't got a clue were model pupils and have brought up angelic children so would not contribute to sending a 68 year old teacher to an even earlier grave (yipee - no pension to pay!)

Quote » | Report this post »

Monotoni says...
3:05pm Wed 30 Nov 11
Correction, penultimate sentence:
"Do you really think we'd let our students down after having invested so much of ourselves in their success" (and No, (pre-empting some cerebrally-challenge

d contributor replying) we don't get paid more if our students do well)
Monotoni says... 2:56pm Wed 30 Nov 11 Needless to say a great deal of ill-informed venom is being directed at public sector workers mainly through jealousy. I am a teacher, on strike for the first time in 40 years. When I accepted my first post the remuneration included a salary and a pension to which I had to contribute a fixed percentage of my salary. That was the deal. I am still doing the same job, in the classroom, paying the same fixed rate on my (now higher) salary. Once my daughter grew up I consulted (for the first time) a financial adviser to make some tentative plans for retirement. He told me that, if I had contracted to pay my pension contributions into a scheme and guaranteed not to touch it for 40 years I would be getting a pension 3 times greater than the one I would get now. The governments have simply put our contributions into the general finances and the latest lot are seeking to renege on their side of the bargain. By all means change the system for new entrants - thet will then be able to decide whether the 'package' they are being offered is attractive or not. As for students being disadvantaged - get real; we will still have to catch up the work as specified by the syllabus prior to exams in January or May - often in our own lunchtimes, non-contact periods etc. Do you really think we'd let our students. And one last thought: no doubt those of you who haven't got a clue were model pupils and have brought up angelic children so would not contribute to sending a 68 year old teacher to an even earlier grave (yipee - no pension to pay!) Quote » | Report this post » Monotoni says... 3:05pm Wed 30 Nov 11 Correction, penultimate sentence: "Do you really think we'd let our students down after having invested so much of ourselves in their success" (and No, (pre-empting some cerebrally-challenge d contributor replying) we don't get paid more if our students do well) Monotoni
  • Score: 0

8:05pm Wed 30 Nov 11

Lifeinthemix says...

i stand corrected, but you just cannot help the jibes, a sign of your imaturity....
i stand corrected, but you just cannot help the jibes, a sign of your imaturity.... Lifeinthemix
  • Score: 0

8:07pm Wed 30 Nov 11

ladysal says...

I could just about stomach what the govt are suggesting despite the fact that it is the SECOND time they have done it within five years if the money was going into our pension funds to keep them solvent.
But it's not. That 3% they are going to add to our contribution will just go straight into the treasury for use wherever they feel like it.
I also saw the marchers in town today (having decided that I couldn't afford to go on strike) and I heard people requesting fair pensions for ALL. Not just the public sector; EVERYONE.
I could just about stomach what the govt are suggesting despite the fact that it is the SECOND time they have done it within five years if the money was going into our pension funds to keep them solvent. But it's not. That 3% they are going to add to our contribution will just go straight into the treasury for use wherever they feel like it. I also saw the marchers in town today (having decided that I couldn't afford to go on strike) and I heard people requesting fair pensions for ALL. Not just the public sector; EVERYONE. ladysal
  • Score: 0

8:51pm Wed 30 Nov 11

Keep Darwen Green says...

Jibes and imaturity is where I come in, do you mind, get out of my house!!!
Jibes and imaturity is where I come in, do you mind, get out of my house!!! Keep Darwen Green
  • Score: 0

8:55pm Wed 30 Nov 11

maggie-T says...

You never saw the unions complaining when Gordon brown and the labour party wrecked every single final salary pension scheme in the country, they fail to realise that the people who pay their wages, us, the taxpayer, will not take this burden alone, we will not work till we are 68 so that these public sector workers can retire at 50-55, it's a battle that we must not back down from, the unions are using these people to launch a war against the Tory party, there is a lot of injustice in this country, most of it when people are on sky high benefits or unsustainable pensions provided by the working class people of this country, it's time they woke up and said hello to the real world.
You never saw the unions complaining when Gordon brown and the labour party wrecked every single final salary pension scheme in the country, they fail to realise that the people who pay their wages, us, the taxpayer, will not take this burden alone, we will not work till we are 68 so that these public sector workers can retire at 50-55, it's a battle that we must not back down from, the unions are using these people to launch a war against the Tory party, there is a lot of injustice in this country, most of it when people are on sky high benefits or unsustainable pensions provided by the working class people of this country, it's time they woke up and said hello to the real world. maggie-T
  • Score: 0

9:08pm Wed 30 Nov 11

everywhere is sh1t says...

start sacking them
start sacking them everywhere is sh1t
  • Score: 0

10:19pm Wed 30 Nov 11

Lifeinthemix says...

the sad thing about this action is the fact it is about money, they never came out on strike when it was clear the children where going to suffer from no education.

what kind of people live off this country today?
the sad thing about this action is the fact it is about money, they never came out on strike when it was clear the children where going to suffer from no education. what kind of people live off this country today? Lifeinthemix
  • Score: 0

11:25pm Wed 30 Nov 11

ladysal says...

What planet are you on? Explain to me exactly who will be retiring at 55? Even now, the earliest anyone can possibly retire in LGPS is 60 ( and I think it is higher than that). I will have to be 65 on the current scheme and if the changes come in it will go up to 68. So, I will have to pay at least 3% extra from my salary, wait an extra 3 years to retire and get less money at the end of my working life. Who do you know who would sit back and take that sort of a change? I've just seen an interview with someone who as a primary school teacher earning around £25k will lose£6,000 a year under these proposals! It's not about the money, it's about the fact that we seem to be seen as a cash cow for the government: "we need some more money! I know, let's trash the public sector pension funds again" don't forget, that 3% isn't going into the pension fund is it? Otherwise, why would our retirement pensions be shrinking?
What planet are you on? Explain to me exactly who will be retiring at 55? Even now, the earliest anyone can possibly retire in LGPS is 60 ( and I think it is higher than that). I will have to be 65 on the current scheme and if the changes come in it will go up to 68. So, I will have to pay at least 3% extra from my salary, wait an extra 3 years to retire and get less money at the end of my working life. Who do you know who would sit back and take that sort of a change? I've just seen an interview with someone who as a primary school teacher earning around £25k will lose£6,000 a year under these proposals! It's not about the money, it's about the fact that we seem to be seen as a cash cow for the government: "we need some more money! I know, let's trash the public sector pension funds again" don't forget, that 3% isn't going into the pension fund is it? Otherwise, why would our retirement pensions be shrinking? ladysal
  • Score: 0

7:20am Thu 1 Dec 11

Jack Herer says...

ladysal wrote:
What planet are you on? Explain to me exactly who will be retiring at 55? Even now, the earliest anyone can possibly retire in LGPS is 60 ( and I think it is higher than that). I will have to be 65 on the current scheme and if the changes come in it will go up to 68. So, I will have to pay at least 3% extra from my salary, wait an extra 3 years to retire and get less money at the end of my working life. Who do you know who would sit back and take that sort of a change? I've just seen an interview with someone who as a primary school teacher earning around £25k will lose£6,000 a year under these proposals! It's not about the money, it's about the fact that we seem to be seen as a cash cow for the government: "we need some more money! I know, let's trash the public sector pension funds again" don't forget, that 3% isn't going into the pension fund is it? Otherwise, why would our retirement pensions be shrinking?
A cash cow for the government? What planet are you on?

Public sector pensions aren't some cash rich scheme where you are all paying in more than you get out. Literally what planet are you on?

Public sector pensions are actually a huge financial drain for other tax payers. No way do contributions get close to how much gets paid out. Currently all working people, no matter how little they get paid, are paying sizable amounts of tax to pay for other people's unsustainable pensions. How grossly unfair. How grossly selfish.

Trash the public sector pension funds again?? What colour is the sky in your wonderful socialist world?

If the world exists like you claim, you should be shouting from the rooftops to have public sector pensions detached from tax payer responsibility and burden. Why aren't you doing this? Why aren't the unions screaming for this?

The tax payer does not want this burden. That's the point. The tax payer is skint and does not want to pay for a pension scheme they could never ever get themselves because it is far too generous. It depends on other suckers paying lots of their hard earned cash. Cash they need themselves thanks.

A school teacher earning £25 a year, will lose £6k a year in their pension? How much was their pension in the first place? £6k a year is way more than most private sector pensions anyway - and that's one paid into with high contributions from age 23 with employee contributions as well. That's living in the real world where the books have to balance.

Please please campaign to have your "cash rich" pensions detached from tax payer burden. Tax payers do not want that burden. It's shameful that you expect them to pay.

To then stick two fingers up to the hard working tax payer who pays for your pension by striking is just disgusting.
[quote][p][bold]ladysal[/bold] wrote: What planet are you on? Explain to me exactly who will be retiring at 55? Even now, the earliest anyone can possibly retire in LGPS is 60 ( and I think it is higher than that). I will have to be 65 on the current scheme and if the changes come in it will go up to 68. So, I will have to pay at least 3% extra from my salary, wait an extra 3 years to retire and get less money at the end of my working life. Who do you know who would sit back and take that sort of a change? I've just seen an interview with someone who as a primary school teacher earning around £25k will lose£6,000 a year under these proposals! It's not about the money, it's about the fact that we seem to be seen as a cash cow for the government: "we need some more money! I know, let's trash the public sector pension funds again" don't forget, that 3% isn't going into the pension fund is it? Otherwise, why would our retirement pensions be shrinking?[/p][/quote]A cash cow for the government? What planet are you on? Public sector pensions aren't some cash rich scheme where you are all paying in more than you get out. Literally what planet are you on? Public sector pensions are actually a huge financial drain for other tax payers. No way do contributions get close to how much gets paid out. Currently all working people, no matter how little they get paid, are paying sizable amounts of tax to pay for other people's unsustainable pensions. How grossly unfair. How grossly selfish. Trash the public sector pension funds again?? What colour is the sky in your wonderful socialist world? If the world exists like you claim, you should be shouting from the rooftops to have public sector pensions detached from tax payer responsibility and burden. Why aren't you doing this? Why aren't the unions screaming for this? The tax payer does not want this burden. That's the point. The tax payer is skint and does not want to pay for a pension scheme they could never ever get themselves because it is far too generous. It depends on other suckers paying lots of their hard earned cash. Cash they need themselves thanks. A school teacher earning £25 a year, will lose £6k a year in their pension? How much was their pension in the first place? £6k a year is way more than most private sector pensions anyway - and that's one paid into with high contributions from age 23 with employee contributions as well. That's living in the real world where the books have to balance. Please please campaign to have your "cash rich" pensions detached from tax payer burden. Tax payers do not want that burden. It's shameful that you expect them to pay. To then stick two fingers up to the hard working tax payer who pays for your pension by striking is just disgusting. Jack Herer
  • Score: 0

7:28am Thu 1 Dec 11

Jack Herer says...

Chris P Bacon wrote:
Jack Herer wrote:
These people need to get in the real world.

Why should the majority of already hard done to, hard working people pay for someone else's grotesquely bloated pension?

It ain't fair people. We are skint as a country and you parasites want to continue to bleed everyone else dry. How are you any different than the bankers?

Stop being so selfish and get in the real world like everyone else, where the books have to balance and the finances have to stackup.
And we're off! Jack Herer takes the lead in the stupid stakes and though there are a few on here who run him close, he's going to win this strike one uncontested.

'The people need to get in the real world'! You wouldn't know the real world if one day we were faced with the tragedy of you waking up in it.

'We are skint as a country'! We are one of the wealthiest countries in the history of the whole world and you bleat about the guff you believe from the loonies running the asylum!

You've lost this one as surely as Steve Kean has lost the confidence of those who support the team he has the misfortune to manage.
One of the wealthiest country in the whole world? How are you measuring wealth exactly as we are very very very much in the red, not the black, as a country. We are skint to the point of owing money - lots and lots and lots.

Don't you mean wealthiest country with the biggest debt in the whole world, and growing bigger by the day because we are BORROWING lots and lots and lots of money.

Do you actually read the news? We've just announced that we will have to BORROW £118 billion (that's billion) more than we thought in the next few years alone. A sizable chunk of that is public sector pensions.

If we are so rich, why are we having to take such huge risks as a country by BORROWING such huge amounts? People don't tend to borrow any money when they are rich.

What colour is the sky in your socialist utopia?

What a moron.
[quote][p][bold]Chris P Bacon[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Jack Herer[/bold] wrote: These people need to get in the real world. Why should the majority of already hard done to, hard working people pay for someone else's grotesquely bloated pension? It ain't fair people. We are skint as a country and you parasites want to continue to bleed everyone else dry. How are you any different than the bankers? Stop being so selfish and get in the real world like everyone else, where the books have to balance and the finances have to stackup.[/p][/quote]And we're off! Jack Herer takes the lead in the stupid stakes and though there are a few on here who run him close, he's going to win this strike one uncontested. 'The people need to get in the real world'! You wouldn't know the real world if one day we were faced with the tragedy of you waking up in it. 'We are skint as a country'! We are one of the wealthiest countries in the history of the whole world and you bleat about the guff you believe from the loonies running the asylum! You've lost this one as surely as Steve Kean has lost the confidence of those who support the team he has the misfortune to manage.[/p][/quote]One of the wealthiest country in the whole world? How are you measuring wealth exactly as we are very very very much in the red, not the black, as a country. We are skint to the point of owing money - lots and lots and lots. Don't you mean wealthiest country with the biggest debt in the whole world, and growing bigger by the day because we are BORROWING lots and lots and lots of money. Do you actually read the news? We've just announced that we will have to BORROW £118 billion (that's billion) more than we thought in the next few years alone. A sizable chunk of that is public sector pensions. If we are so rich, why are we having to take such huge risks as a country by BORROWING such huge amounts? People don't tend to borrow any money when they are rich. What colour is the sky in your socialist utopia? What a moron. Jack Herer
  • Score: 0

7:50am Thu 1 Dec 11

Good call says...

maggie-T wrote:
You never saw the unions complaining when Gordon brown and the labour party wrecked every single final salary pension scheme in the country, they fail to realise that the people who pay their wages, us, the taxpayer, will not take this burden alone, we will not work till we are 68 so that these public sector workers can retire at 50-55, it's a battle that we must not back down from, the unions are using these people to launch a war against the Tory party, there is a lot of injustice in this country, most of it when people are on sky high benefits or unsustainable pensions provided by the working class people of this country, it's time they woke up and said hello to the real world.
Another sheeple.Where do you get this crap about public sector workers retiring at 55 from if that is true,it'll only be jobs like the police which is physically demanding."Sky high benefits" another heap of shi1e jobseekers allowance for a under 25 is 50 odd quid a week.The likes of you have fallen for the government propaganda hook,line and sinker. Baaah.....
[quote][p][bold]maggie-T[/bold] wrote: You never saw the unions complaining when Gordon brown and the labour party wrecked every single final salary pension scheme in the country, they fail to realise that the people who pay their wages, us, the taxpayer, will not take this burden alone, we will not work till we are 68 so that these public sector workers can retire at 50-55, it's a battle that we must not back down from, the unions are using these people to launch a war against the Tory party, there is a lot of injustice in this country, most of it when people are on sky high benefits or unsustainable pensions provided by the working class people of this country, it's time they woke up and said hello to the real world.[/p][/quote]Another sheeple.Where do you get this crap about public sector workers retiring at 55 from if that is true,it'll only be jobs like the police which is physically demanding."Sky high benefits" another heap of shi1e jobseekers allowance for a under 25 is 50 odd quid a week.The likes of you have fallen for the government propaganda hook,line and sinker. Baaah..... Good call
  • Score: 0

9:17am Thu 1 Dec 11

Allan Whitehead says...

Strikes and Pickets Why,
Well many years ago when we had child labour, some forward progressive organisations, began to think it was wrong to have children working at 11, 12 and 13 years of age.
Therefore, they agitated until the Government of the day altered the rules slightly, and allowed children to go to school and be educated. However, this was much against the grain with many members of parliament. Then one day, it was realised by the people they were being used to make Mill and Foundry Owners very rich, so when they became old, they would not want.
Because of being educated, the workers began to realise, they also reached a time when the mill, and foundry owners, no longer needed their services, because, they could not maintain the previous stamina they had shown when younger. Then came the great wars, and many took part in these fights for freedom. After, these wars came another breed of persons one who would stand up for themselves. (Possibly, due to the fact, they had seen how powerful they had been, when they all grouped together for a particular cause) If it had worked during the great wars, why not in peacetime?
Following, many others who would receive pensions for their service. Regular Soldiers, Policemen, Bankers, unions very slowly achieved pensions for manual workers, we already had the state pension, now works pensions became into being, and many workers contributed to provide themselves with a pension for their elderly years. Now because the public sectors appear to be at the upper end of the scale, having negotiated their conditions, and agreed them, with their so-called bosses. Someone wishes to change the rules. Why?
Strikes and Pickets Why, Well many years ago when we had child labour, some forward progressive organisations, began to think it was wrong to have children working at 11, 12 and 13 years of age. Therefore, they agitated until the Government of the day altered the rules slightly, and allowed children to go to school and be educated. However, this was much against the grain with many members of parliament. Then one day, it was realised by the people they were being used to make Mill and Foundry Owners very rich, so when they became old, they would not want. Because of being educated, the workers began to realise, they also reached a time when the mill, and foundry owners, no longer needed their services, because, they could not maintain the previous stamina they had shown when younger. Then came the great wars, and many took part in these fights for freedom. After, these wars came another breed of persons one who would stand up for themselves. (Possibly, due to the fact, they had seen how powerful they had been, when they all grouped together for a particular cause) If it had worked during the great wars, why not in peacetime? Following, many others who would receive pensions for their service. Regular Soldiers, Policemen, Bankers, unions very slowly achieved pensions for manual workers, we already had the state pension, now works pensions became into being, and many workers contributed to provide themselves with a pension for their elderly years. Now because the public sectors appear to be at the upper end of the scale, having negotiated their conditions, and agreed them, with their so-called bosses. Someone wishes to change the rules. Why? Allan Whitehead
  • Score: 0

10:00am Thu 1 Dec 11

DCI says...

MYTH - There's a big public sector pensions deficit that has to be repaid.

There is no funding gap - the public sector schemes were assessed for long term risk and adjusted accordingly three years ago and are now very secure.

Both the local government pension scheme and NHS pension scheme are currently cash rich with income far exceeding outgoings - some £2 billion in the case of the NHS pensi...on scheme.

MYTH - Public services and public service pensions are causing the financial crisis.

It was the banking sector's reckless risk taking and excessive greed that caused this global recession.

MYTH - We're all in it together. Everyone has to make sacrifices right now - why not public sector workers?

We are all facing cuts to our public services - on top of this public service workers are facing unprecedented job cuts and a pay freeze.

We will all end up paying more tax if people drop out of the scheme to end up relying on the state in their old age.

MYTH - It's not fair, why should the public sector get good pensions when the private sector doesn't?

The average director of a FTSE 100 company has a final salary pension worth £3.6m or £174,963 a year, while the average occupational pension generally is £9,500 a year and the average public service pension is £7,800 a year. That's the real unfairness.

UNISON thinks everyone deserves an adequate pension, including workers in the private sector. We should improve bad schemes rather than make good ones bad.

Providing adequate pensions means that fewer people will be receiving welfare handouts after retirement, which would cost the taxpayer more money in the long run.

MYTH - Public sector workers have it too good with huge pensions.

The average public service pension is around £7,800 a year, for women working in local government the average is £2,800 a year, while the median for women working in the NHS is £3,500 a year: hardly huge pensions.

Saving towards an occupational pension in many cases means a person is receiving fewer welfare benefits during retirement, saving the taxpayer money.

MYTH - Taxpayers are paying for public service workers' pensions. That's not fair.

Everyone's taxes are used to pay for all public services - stethoscopes in hospitals, the salaries of primary school teachers, people to change the light bulbs in street lamps, and part of these people's pay is their pension.

A pension is part of someone's salary package and is no different than an annual salary, a car, or the London weighting allowance. It's not fair to change something in a job contract after someone accepted the job.

One in five people working in the UK works in public services. They are taxpayers too.
MYTH - There's a big public sector pensions deficit that has to be repaid. There is no funding gap - the public sector schemes were assessed for long term risk and adjusted accordingly three years ago and are now very secure. Both the local government pension scheme and NHS pension scheme are currently cash rich with income far exceeding outgoings - some £2 billion in the case of the NHS pensi...on scheme. MYTH - Public services and public service pensions are causing the financial crisis. It was the banking sector's reckless risk taking and excessive greed that caused this global recession. MYTH - We're all in it together. Everyone has to make sacrifices right now - why not public sector workers? We are all facing cuts to our public services - on top of this public service workers are facing unprecedented job cuts and a pay freeze. We will all end up paying more tax if people drop out of the scheme to end up relying on the state in their old age. MYTH - It's not fair, why should the public sector get good pensions when the private sector doesn't? The average director of a FTSE 100 company has a final salary pension worth £3.6m or £174,963 a year, while the average occupational pension generally is £9,500 a year and the average public service pension is £7,800 a year. That's the real unfairness. UNISON thinks everyone deserves an adequate pension, including workers in the private sector. We should improve bad schemes rather than make good ones bad. Providing adequate pensions means that fewer people will be receiving welfare handouts after retirement, which would cost the taxpayer more money in the long run. MYTH - Public sector workers have it too good with huge pensions. The average public service pension is around £7,800 a year, for women working in local government the average is £2,800 a year, while the median for women working in the NHS is £3,500 a year: hardly huge pensions. Saving towards an occupational pension in many cases means a person is receiving fewer welfare benefits during retirement, saving the taxpayer money. MYTH - Taxpayers are paying for public service workers' pensions. That's not fair. Everyone's taxes are used to pay for all public services - stethoscopes in hospitals, the salaries of primary school teachers, people to change the light bulbs in street lamps, and part of these people's pay is their pension. A pension is part of someone's salary package and is no different than an annual salary, a car, or the London weighting allowance. It's not fair to change something in a job contract after someone accepted the job. One in five people working in the UK works in public services. They are taxpayers too. DCI
  • Score: 0

10:45am Thu 1 Dec 11

Lifeinthemix says...

it aint my debt, my birth certificate has crown copyright on it, ergo i cannot then claim liability, to do so would breach crown copyright.
it aint my debt, my birth certificate has crown copyright on it, ergo i cannot then claim liability, to do so would breach crown copyright. Lifeinthemix
  • Score: 0

10:49am Thu 1 Dec 11

Allan Whitehead says...

DCI wrote:
MYTH - There's a big public sector pensions deficit that has to be repaid.

There is no funding gap - the public sector schemes were assessed for long term risk and adjusted accordingly three years ago and are now very secure.

Both the local government pension scheme and NHS pension scheme are currently cash rich with income far exceeding outgoings - some £2 billion in the case of the NHS pensi...on scheme.

MYTH - Public services and public service pensions are causing the financial crisis.

It was the banking sector's reckless risk taking and excessive greed that caused this global recession.

MYTH - We're all in it together. Everyone has to make sacrifices right now - why not public sector workers?

We are all facing cuts to our public services - on top of this public service workers are facing unprecedented job cuts and a pay freeze.

We will all end up paying more tax if people drop out of the scheme to end up relying on the state in their old age.

MYTH - It's not fair, why should the public sector get good pensions when the private sector doesn't?

The average director of a FTSE 100 company has a final salary pension worth £3.6m or £174,963 a year, while the average occupational pension generally is £9,500 a year and the average public service pension is £7,800 a year. That's the real unfairness.

UNISON thinks everyone deserves an adequate pension, including workers in the private sector. We should improve bad schemes rather than make good ones bad.

Providing adequate pensions means that fewer people will be receiving welfare handouts after retirement, which would cost the taxpayer more money in the long run.

MYTH - Public sector workers have it too good with huge pensions.

The average public service pension is around £7,800 a year, for women working in local government the average is £2,800 a year, while the median for women working in the NHS is £3,500 a year: hardly huge pensions.

Saving towards an occupational pension in many cases means a person is receiving fewer welfare benefits during retirement, saving the taxpayer money.

MYTH - Taxpayers are paying for public service workers' pensions. That's not fair.

Everyone's taxes are used to pay for all public services - stethoscopes in hospitals, the salaries of primary school teachers, people to change the light bulbs in street lamps, and part of these people's pay is their pension.

A pension is part of someone's salary package and is no different than an annual salary, a car, or the London weighting allowance. It's not fair to change something in a job contract after someone accepted the job.

One in five people working in the UK works in public services. They are taxpayers too.
DCI,
After reading your comment, I have just had thought. During my working life, this was with a forward thinking Company, who treated its employees, with some type of employment equality.
We were all offered the opportunity to join the company pension scheme, I recall some employees took advantage of the pension scheme, as I did, paying some 3.3/4% of my earnings into this scheme.
This at the time of retirement had amounted to £7.50 per week, which was tax-free.
This gives me a private retirement of £8016.00 per year. In addition, I also receive a small state pension of £5844.00 making a total off £13860.00 per 12months.
Like you have already mentioned, I am unable to claim any extra benefits other than our heating allowance, and reduced Television licence fee. (Which retired bankers will also receive)
In addition to the above, I have friends who did not pay into the system, and can claim for everything.
In addition, they appear to be far better off than we are.
[quote][p][bold]DCI[/bold] wrote: MYTH - There's a big public sector pensions deficit that has to be repaid. There is no funding gap - the public sector schemes were assessed for long term risk and adjusted accordingly three years ago and are now very secure. Both the local government pension scheme and NHS pension scheme are currently cash rich with income far exceeding outgoings - some £2 billion in the case of the NHS pensi...on scheme. MYTH - Public services and public service pensions are causing the financial crisis. It was the banking sector's reckless risk taking and excessive greed that caused this global recession. MYTH - We're all in it together. Everyone has to make sacrifices right now - why not public sector workers? We are all facing cuts to our public services - on top of this public service workers are facing unprecedented job cuts and a pay freeze. We will all end up paying more tax if people drop out of the scheme to end up relying on the state in their old age. MYTH - It's not fair, why should the public sector get good pensions when the private sector doesn't? The average director of a FTSE 100 company has a final salary pension worth £3.6m or £174,963 a year, while the average occupational pension generally is £9,500 a year and the average public service pension is £7,800 a year. That's the real unfairness. UNISON thinks everyone deserves an adequate pension, including workers in the private sector. We should improve bad schemes rather than make good ones bad. Providing adequate pensions means that fewer people will be receiving welfare handouts after retirement, which would cost the taxpayer more money in the long run. MYTH - Public sector workers have it too good with huge pensions. The average public service pension is around £7,800 a year, for women working in local government the average is £2,800 a year, while the median for women working in the NHS is £3,500 a year: hardly huge pensions. Saving towards an occupational pension in many cases means a person is receiving fewer welfare benefits during retirement, saving the taxpayer money. MYTH - Taxpayers are paying for public service workers' pensions. That's not fair. Everyone's taxes are used to pay for all public services - stethoscopes in hospitals, the salaries of primary school teachers, people to change the light bulbs in street lamps, and part of these people's pay is their pension. A pension is part of someone's salary package and is no different than an annual salary, a car, or the London weighting allowance. It's not fair to change something in a job contract after someone accepted the job. One in five people working in the UK works in public services. They are taxpayers too.[/p][/quote]DCI, After reading your comment, I have just had thought. During my working life, this was with a forward thinking Company, who treated its employees, with some type of employment equality. We were all offered the opportunity to join the company pension scheme, I recall some employees took advantage of the pension scheme, as I did, paying some 3.3/4% of my earnings into this scheme. This at the time of retirement had amounted to £7.50 per week, which was tax-free. This gives me a private retirement of £8016.00 per year. In addition, I also receive a small state pension of £5844.00 making a total off £13860.00 per 12months. Like you have already mentioned, I am unable to claim any extra benefits other than our heating allowance, and reduced Television licence fee. (Which retired bankers will also receive) In addition to the above, I have friends who did not pay into the system, and can claim for everything. In addition, they appear to be far better off than we are. Allan Whitehead
  • Score: 0

12:43pm Thu 1 Dec 11

Jack Herer says...

DCI wrote:
MYTH - There's a big public sector pensions deficit that has to be repaid.

There is no funding gap - the public sector schemes were assessed for long term risk and adjusted accordingly three years ago and are now very secure.

Both the local government pension scheme and NHS pension scheme are currently cash rich with income far exceeding outgoings - some £2 billion in the case of the NHS pensi...on scheme.

MYTH - Public services and public service pensions are causing the financial crisis.

It was the banking sector's reckless risk taking and excessive greed that caused this global recession.

MYTH - We're all in it together. Everyone has to make sacrifices right now - why not public sector workers?

We are all facing cuts to our public services - on top of this public service workers are facing unprecedented job cuts and a pay freeze.

We will all end up paying more tax if people drop out of the scheme to end up relying on the state in their old age.

MYTH - It's not fair, why should the public sector get good pensions when the private sector doesn't?

The average director of a FTSE 100 company has a final salary pension worth £3.6m or £174,963 a year, while the average occupational pension generally is £9,500 a year and the average public service pension is £7,800 a year. That's the real unfairness.

UNISON thinks everyone deserves an adequate pension, including workers in the private sector. We should improve bad schemes rather than make good ones bad.

Providing adequate pensions means that fewer people will be receiving welfare handouts after retirement, which would cost the taxpayer more money in the long run.

MYTH - Public sector workers have it too good with huge pensions.

The average public service pension is around £7,800 a year, for women working in local government the average is £2,800 a year, while the median for women working in the NHS is £3,500 a year: hardly huge pensions.

Saving towards an occupational pension in many cases means a person is receiving fewer welfare benefits during retirement, saving the taxpayer money.

MYTH - Taxpayers are paying for public service workers' pensions. That's not fair.

Everyone's taxes are used to pay for all public services - stethoscopes in hospitals, the salaries of primary school teachers, people to change the light bulbs in street lamps, and part of these people's pay is their pension.

A pension is part of someone's salary package and is no different than an annual salary, a car, or the London weighting allowance. It's not fair to change something in a job contract after someone accepted the job.

One in five people working in the UK works in public services. They are taxpayers too.
Brilliant please campaign to have public sector pensions taken away from tax payer burden.

Why are you not screaming for this to happen, if all your information is correct? Why?

As it stands you are parasites leeching off hard working skint private sector workers. Why would you not want to change that if your information is correct? Why?

Either your information is correct and you therefore want tax payer burden, and therefore meddling, removed from public sector pensions, or you are totally wrong and are in fact parasites leeching off other hard working people.

Which one is it? Do you want tax payer burden removed from public sector pensions or not?
[quote][p][bold]DCI[/bold] wrote: MYTH - There's a big public sector pensions deficit that has to be repaid. There is no funding gap - the public sector schemes were assessed for long term risk and adjusted accordingly three years ago and are now very secure. Both the local government pension scheme and NHS pension scheme are currently cash rich with income far exceeding outgoings - some £2 billion in the case of the NHS pensi...on scheme. MYTH - Public services and public service pensions are causing the financial crisis. It was the banking sector's reckless risk taking and excessive greed that caused this global recession. MYTH - We're all in it together. Everyone has to make sacrifices right now - why not public sector workers? We are all facing cuts to our public services - on top of this public service workers are facing unprecedented job cuts and a pay freeze. We will all end up paying more tax if people drop out of the scheme to end up relying on the state in their old age. MYTH - It's not fair, why should the public sector get good pensions when the private sector doesn't? The average director of a FTSE 100 company has a final salary pension worth £3.6m or £174,963 a year, while the average occupational pension generally is £9,500 a year and the average public service pension is £7,800 a year. That's the real unfairness. UNISON thinks everyone deserves an adequate pension, including workers in the private sector. We should improve bad schemes rather than make good ones bad. Providing adequate pensions means that fewer people will be receiving welfare handouts after retirement, which would cost the taxpayer more money in the long run. MYTH - Public sector workers have it too good with huge pensions. The average public service pension is around £7,800 a year, for women working in local government the average is £2,800 a year, while the median for women working in the NHS is £3,500 a year: hardly huge pensions. Saving towards an occupational pension in many cases means a person is receiving fewer welfare benefits during retirement, saving the taxpayer money. MYTH - Taxpayers are paying for public service workers' pensions. That's not fair. Everyone's taxes are used to pay for all public services - stethoscopes in hospitals, the salaries of primary school teachers, people to change the light bulbs in street lamps, and part of these people's pay is their pension. A pension is part of someone's salary package and is no different than an annual salary, a car, or the London weighting allowance. It's not fair to change something in a job contract after someone accepted the job. One in five people working in the UK works in public services. They are taxpayers too.[/p][/quote]Brilliant please campaign to have public sector pensions taken away from tax payer burden. Why are you not screaming for this to happen, if all your information is correct? Why? As it stands you are parasites leeching off hard working skint private sector workers. Why would you not want to change that if your information is correct? Why? Either your information is correct and you therefore want tax payer burden, and therefore meddling, removed from public sector pensions, or you are totally wrong and are in fact parasites leeching off other hard working people. Which one is it? Do you want tax payer burden removed from public sector pensions or not? Jack Herer
  • Score: 0

12:43pm Thu 1 Dec 11

Jack Herer says...

DCI wrote:
MYTH - There's a big public sector pensions deficit that has to be repaid.

There is no funding gap - the public sector schemes were assessed for long term risk and adjusted accordingly three years ago and are now very secure.

Both the local government pension scheme and NHS pension scheme are currently cash rich with income far exceeding outgoings - some £2 billion in the case of the NHS pensi...on scheme.

MYTH - Public services and public service pensions are causing the financial crisis.

It was the banking sector's reckless risk taking and excessive greed that caused this global recession.

MYTH - We're all in it together. Everyone has to make sacrifices right now - why not public sector workers?

We are all facing cuts to our public services - on top of this public service workers are facing unprecedented job cuts and a pay freeze.

We will all end up paying more tax if people drop out of the scheme to end up relying on the state in their old age.

MYTH - It's not fair, why should the public sector get good pensions when the private sector doesn't?

The average director of a FTSE 100 company has a final salary pension worth £3.6m or £174,963 a year, while the average occupational pension generally is £9,500 a year and the average public service pension is £7,800 a year. That's the real unfairness.

UNISON thinks everyone deserves an adequate pension, including workers in the private sector. We should improve bad schemes rather than make good ones bad.

Providing adequate pensions means that fewer people will be receiving welfare handouts after retirement, which would cost the taxpayer more money in the long run.

MYTH - Public sector workers have it too good with huge pensions.

The average public service pension is around £7,800 a year, for women working in local government the average is £2,800 a year, while the median for women working in the NHS is £3,500 a year: hardly huge pensions.

Saving towards an occupational pension in many cases means a person is receiving fewer welfare benefits during retirement, saving the taxpayer money.

MYTH - Taxpayers are paying for public service workers' pensions. That's not fair.

Everyone's taxes are used to pay for all public services - stethoscopes in hospitals, the salaries of primary school teachers, people to change the light bulbs in street lamps, and part of these people's pay is their pension.

A pension is part of someone's salary package and is no different than an annual salary, a car, or the London weighting allowance. It's not fair to change something in a job contract after someone accepted the job.

One in five people working in the UK works in public services. They are taxpayers too.
Brilliant please campaign to have public sector pensions taken away from tax payer burden.

Why are you not screaming for this to happen, if all your information is correct? Why?

As it stands you are parasites leeching off hard working skint private sector workers. Why would you not want to change that if your information is correct? Why?

Either your information is correct and you therefore want tax payer burden, and therefore meddling, removed from public sector pensions, or you are totally wrong and are in fact parasites leeching off other hard working people.

Which one is it? Do you want tax payer burden removed from public sector pensions or not?
[quote][p][bold]DCI[/bold] wrote: MYTH - There's a big public sector pensions deficit that has to be repaid. There is no funding gap - the public sector schemes were assessed for long term risk and adjusted accordingly three years ago and are now very secure. Both the local government pension scheme and NHS pension scheme are currently cash rich with income far exceeding outgoings - some £2 billion in the case of the NHS pensi...on scheme. MYTH - Public services and public service pensions are causing the financial crisis. It was the banking sector's reckless risk taking and excessive greed that caused this global recession. MYTH - We're all in it together. Everyone has to make sacrifices right now - why not public sector workers? We are all facing cuts to our public services - on top of this public service workers are facing unprecedented job cuts and a pay freeze. We will all end up paying more tax if people drop out of the scheme to end up relying on the state in their old age. MYTH - It's not fair, why should the public sector get good pensions when the private sector doesn't? The average director of a FTSE 100 company has a final salary pension worth £3.6m or £174,963 a year, while the average occupational pension generally is £9,500 a year and the average public service pension is £7,800 a year. That's the real unfairness. UNISON thinks everyone deserves an adequate pension, including workers in the private sector. We should improve bad schemes rather than make good ones bad. Providing adequate pensions means that fewer people will be receiving welfare handouts after retirement, which would cost the taxpayer more money in the long run. MYTH - Public sector workers have it too good with huge pensions. The average public service pension is around £7,800 a year, for women working in local government the average is £2,800 a year, while the median for women working in the NHS is £3,500 a year: hardly huge pensions. Saving towards an occupational pension in many cases means a person is receiving fewer welfare benefits during retirement, saving the taxpayer money. MYTH - Taxpayers are paying for public service workers' pensions. That's not fair. Everyone's taxes are used to pay for all public services - stethoscopes in hospitals, the salaries of primary school teachers, people to change the light bulbs in street lamps, and part of these people's pay is their pension. A pension is part of someone's salary package and is no different than an annual salary, a car, or the London weighting allowance. It's not fair to change something in a job contract after someone accepted the job. One in five people working in the UK works in public services. They are taxpayers too.[/p][/quote]Brilliant please campaign to have public sector pensions taken away from tax payer burden. Why are you not screaming for this to happen, if all your information is correct? Why? As it stands you are parasites leeching off hard working skint private sector workers. Why would you not want to change that if your information is correct? Why? Either your information is correct and you therefore want tax payer burden, and therefore meddling, removed from public sector pensions, or you are totally wrong and are in fact parasites leeching off other hard working people. Which one is it? Do you want tax payer burden removed from public sector pensions or not? Jack Herer
  • Score: 0

12:49pm Thu 1 Dec 11

Jack Herer says...

Allan Whitehead wrote:
Strikes and Pickets Why,
Well many years ago when we had child labour, some forward progressive organisations, began to think it was wrong to have children working at 11, 12 and 13 years of age.
Therefore, they agitated until the Government of the day altered the rules slightly, and allowed children to go to school and be educated. However, this was much against the grain with many members of parliament. Then one day, it was realised by the people they were being used to make Mill and Foundry Owners very rich, so when they became old, they would not want.
Because of being educated, the workers began to realise, they also reached a time when the mill, and foundry owners, no longer needed their services, because, they could not maintain the previous stamina they had shown when younger. Then came the great wars, and many took part in these fights for freedom. After, these wars came another breed of persons one who would stand up for themselves. (Possibly, due to the fact, they had seen how powerful they had been, when they all grouped together for a particular cause) If it had worked during the great wars, why not in peacetime?
Following, many others who would receive pensions for their service. Regular Soldiers, Policemen, Bankers, unions very slowly achieved pensions for manual workers, we already had the state pension, now works pensions became into being, and many workers contributed to provide themselves with a pension for their elderly years. Now because the public sectors appear to be at the upper end of the scale, having negotiated their conditions, and agreed them, with their so-called bosses. Someone wishes to change the rules. Why?
Simple we can't afford to pay anymore.

The figures were conceived by Gordon Brown who's reckless non-regulation of the banks has brought the country to it's knees, and also had forecasts based on the money tree he thought the bankers, who he was knighting in droves, had found.

There was no money tree. There is no money. We are currently borrowing and borrowing and borrowing. Billions upon billions upon billions. Outside of countries on the brink like Greece and Ireland and Portugal, we have the biggest debt. It's because we were doing similarly things spending under Labour. All borrowed.

That's what's changed. There ain't no money tree.
[quote][p][bold]Allan Whitehead[/bold] wrote: Strikes and Pickets Why, Well many years ago when we had child labour, some forward progressive organisations, began to think it was wrong to have children working at 11, 12 and 13 years of age. Therefore, they agitated until the Government of the day altered the rules slightly, and allowed children to go to school and be educated. However, this was much against the grain with many members of parliament. Then one day, it was realised by the people they were being used to make Mill and Foundry Owners very rich, so when they became old, they would not want. Because of being educated, the workers began to realise, they also reached a time when the mill, and foundry owners, no longer needed their services, because, they could not maintain the previous stamina they had shown when younger. Then came the great wars, and many took part in these fights for freedom. After, these wars came another breed of persons one who would stand up for themselves. (Possibly, due to the fact, they had seen how powerful they had been, when they all grouped together for a particular cause) If it had worked during the great wars, why not in peacetime? Following, many others who would receive pensions for their service. Regular Soldiers, Policemen, Bankers, unions very slowly achieved pensions for manual workers, we already had the state pension, now works pensions became into being, and many workers contributed to provide themselves with a pension for their elderly years. Now because the public sectors appear to be at the upper end of the scale, having negotiated their conditions, and agreed them, with their so-called bosses. Someone wishes to change the rules. Why?[/p][/quote]Simple we can't afford to pay anymore. The figures were conceived by Gordon Brown who's reckless non-regulation of the banks has brought the country to it's knees, and also had forecasts based on the money tree he thought the bankers, who he was knighting in droves, had found. There was no money tree. There is no money. We are currently borrowing and borrowing and borrowing. Billions upon billions upon billions. Outside of countries on the brink like Greece and Ireland and Portugal, we have the biggest debt. It's because we were doing similarly things spending under Labour. All borrowed. That's what's changed. There ain't no money tree. Jack Herer
  • Score: 0

1:41pm Thu 1 Dec 11

Allan Whitehead says...

Jack Herer wrote:
Allan Whitehead wrote:
Strikes and Pickets Why,
Well many years ago when we had child labour, some forward progressive organisations, began to think it was wrong to have children working at 11, 12 and 13 years of age.
Therefore, they agitated until the Government of the day altered the rules slightly, and allowed children to go to school and be educated. However, this was much against the grain with many members of parliament. Then one day, it was realised by the people they were being used to make Mill and Foundry Owners very rich, so when they became old, they would not want.
Because of being educated, the workers began to realise, they also reached a time when the mill, and foundry owners, no longer needed their services, because, they could not maintain the previous stamina they had shown when younger. Then came the great wars, and many took part in these fights for freedom. After, these wars came another breed of persons one who would stand up for themselves. (Possibly, due to the fact, they had seen how powerful they had been, when they all grouped together for a particular cause) If it had worked during the great wars, why not in peacetime?
Following, many others who would receive pensions for their service. Regular Soldiers, Policemen, Bankers, unions very slowly achieved pensions for manual workers, we already had the state pension, now works pensions became into being, and many workers contributed to provide themselves with a pension for their elderly years. Now because the public sectors appear to be at the upper end of the scale, having negotiated their conditions, and agreed them, with their so-called bosses. Someone wishes to change the rules. Why?
Simple we can't afford to pay anymore.

The figures were conceived by Gordon Brown who's reckless non-regulation of the banks has brought the country to it's knees, and also had forecasts based on the money tree he thought the bankers, who he was knighting in droves, had found.

There was no money tree. There is no money. We are currently borrowing and borrowing and borrowing. Billions upon billions upon billions. Outside of countries on the brink like Greece and Ireland and Portugal, we have the biggest debt. It's because we were doing similarly things spending under Labour. All borrowed.

That's what's changed. There ain't no money tree.
How fascinating it is to read so many selfish comments. How would you feel if an insurance company decided to alter its terms and conditions after you had paid a substantial premium, and you had taken note of all the small print?
Would you just sit at home and complain, or would you demonstrate your feelings?
These taking action are doing so to protect what they have agreed with their employers.
Had the employee broken any part of the agreements; they would have been in breach contract. Yet, here we have government interference with an offer of take it or leave it.
Please do not say we are broke, when we give millions of £ sterling in foreign aid.
It will not be long before we are asked to bail out the collapsed Euro.
[quote][p][bold]Jack Herer[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Allan Whitehead[/bold] wrote: Strikes and Pickets Why, Well many years ago when we had child labour, some forward progressive organisations, began to think it was wrong to have children working at 11, 12 and 13 years of age. Therefore, they agitated until the Government of the day altered the rules slightly, and allowed children to go to school and be educated. However, this was much against the grain with many members of parliament. Then one day, it was realised by the people they were being used to make Mill and Foundry Owners very rich, so when they became old, they would not want. Because of being educated, the workers began to realise, they also reached a time when the mill, and foundry owners, no longer needed their services, because, they could not maintain the previous stamina they had shown when younger. Then came the great wars, and many took part in these fights for freedom. After, these wars came another breed of persons one who would stand up for themselves. (Possibly, due to the fact, they had seen how powerful they had been, when they all grouped together for a particular cause) If it had worked during the great wars, why not in peacetime? Following, many others who would receive pensions for their service. Regular Soldiers, Policemen, Bankers, unions very slowly achieved pensions for manual workers, we already had the state pension, now works pensions became into being, and many workers contributed to provide themselves with a pension for their elderly years. Now because the public sectors appear to be at the upper end of the scale, having negotiated their conditions, and agreed them, with their so-called bosses. Someone wishes to change the rules. Why?[/p][/quote]Simple we can't afford to pay anymore. The figures were conceived by Gordon Brown who's reckless non-regulation of the banks has brought the country to it's knees, and also had forecasts based on the money tree he thought the bankers, who he was knighting in droves, had found. There was no money tree. There is no money. We are currently borrowing and borrowing and borrowing. Billions upon billions upon billions. Outside of countries on the brink like Greece and Ireland and Portugal, we have the biggest debt. It's because we were doing similarly things spending under Labour. All borrowed. That's what's changed. There ain't no money tree.[/p][/quote]How fascinating it is to read so many selfish comments. How would you feel if an insurance company decided to alter its terms and conditions after you had paid a substantial premium, and you had taken note of all the small print? Would you just sit at home and complain, or would you demonstrate your feelings? These taking action are doing so to protect what they have agreed with their employers. Had the employee broken any part of the agreements; they would have been in breach contract. Yet, here we have government interference with an offer of take it or leave it. Please do not say we are broke, when we give millions of £ sterling in foreign aid. It will not be long before we are asked to bail out the collapsed Euro. Allan Whitehead
  • Score: 0

3:45pm Thu 1 Dec 11

pdb951 says...

Get back to work and realise how lucky you are
Get back to work and realise how lucky you are pdb951
  • Score: 0

4:25pm Thu 1 Dec 11

Hopping mad says...

Jack Herer wrote:
Allan Whitehead wrote:
Strikes and Pickets Why,
Well many years ago when we had child labour, some forward progressive organisations, began to think it was wrong to have children working at 11, 12 and 13 years of age.
Therefore, they agitated until the Government of the day altered the rules slightly, and allowed children to go to school and be educated. However, this was much against the grain with many members of parliament. Then one day, it was realised by the people they were being used to make Mill and Foundry Owners very rich, so when they became old, they would not want.
Because of being educated, the workers began to realise, they also reached a time when the mill, and foundry owners, no longer needed their services, because, they could not maintain the previous stamina they had shown when younger. Then came the great wars, and many took part in these fights for freedom. After, these wars came another breed of persons one who would stand up for themselves. (Possibly, due to the fact, they had seen how powerful they had been, when they all grouped together for a particular cause) If it had worked during the great wars, why not in peacetime?
Following, many others who would receive pensions for their service. Regular Soldiers, Policemen, Bankers, unions very slowly achieved pensions for manual workers, we already had the state pension, now works pensions became into being, and many workers contributed to provide themselves with a pension for their elderly years. Now because the public sectors appear to be at the upper end of the scale, having negotiated their conditions, and agreed them, with their so-called bosses. Someone wishes to change the rules. Why?
Simple we can't afford to pay anymore.

The figures were conceived by Gordon Brown who's reckless non-regulation of the banks has brought the country to it's knees, and also had forecasts based on the money tree he thought the bankers, who he was knighting in droves, had found.

There was no money tree. There is no money. We are currently borrowing and borrowing and borrowing. Billions upon billions upon billions. Outside of countries on the brink like Greece and Ireland and Portugal, we have the biggest debt. It's because we were doing similarly things spending under Labour. All borrowed.

That's what's changed. There ain't no money tree.
Why do you say we have no money left when we give the EU 9.4 billion, we spent 300 million a day on Libya, 0.7% of GDP to other countries who have their own aid program and are due to spend 100 billion on the update of trident. Also Osbourne is promising more money to the IMF to bail out Greece and Italy.

You sound like somebody who is just bitter and twisted and can't see the bigger picture here. Do you work? If so, how would you like your employer turning round to you tomorrow and saying sorry Jackie we cant afford to pay you what we promised you today we can only afford £2 an hour. I know what you would say.

How was you educated I wonder?
Was you born in an hospital?
Do you have your bins emptied?

These are some of the things your paying for, I earn what the going rate is for doing that job. I then, out of that money I have earned pay into a pension that was offered to me when I sold my labour to the government.

I don't hear you harping on about what your beloved Tory PM is on and how he is going to reduce his.

Your just a sad individual and I wish you had been down there on the megaphone because I will guarantee it would have been stuck up where the sun don't shine.
[quote][p][bold]Jack Herer[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Allan Whitehead[/bold] wrote: Strikes and Pickets Why, Well many years ago when we had child labour, some forward progressive organisations, began to think it was wrong to have children working at 11, 12 and 13 years of age. Therefore, they agitated until the Government of the day altered the rules slightly, and allowed children to go to school and be educated. However, this was much against the grain with many members of parliament. Then one day, it was realised by the people they were being used to make Mill and Foundry Owners very rich, so when they became old, they would not want. Because of being educated, the workers began to realise, they also reached a time when the mill, and foundry owners, no longer needed their services, because, they could not maintain the previous stamina they had shown when younger. Then came the great wars, and many took part in these fights for freedom. After, these wars came another breed of persons one who would stand up for themselves. (Possibly, due to the fact, they had seen how powerful they had been, when they all grouped together for a particular cause) If it had worked during the great wars, why not in peacetime? Following, many others who would receive pensions for their service. Regular Soldiers, Policemen, Bankers, unions very slowly achieved pensions for manual workers, we already had the state pension, now works pensions became into being, and many workers contributed to provide themselves with a pension for their elderly years. Now because the public sectors appear to be at the upper end of the scale, having negotiated their conditions, and agreed them, with their so-called bosses. Someone wishes to change the rules. Why?[/p][/quote]Simple we can't afford to pay anymore. The figures were conceived by Gordon Brown who's reckless non-regulation of the banks has brought the country to it's knees, and also had forecasts based on the money tree he thought the bankers, who he was knighting in droves, had found. There was no money tree. There is no money. We are currently borrowing and borrowing and borrowing. Billions upon billions upon billions. Outside of countries on the brink like Greece and Ireland and Portugal, we have the biggest debt. It's because we were doing similarly things spending under Labour. All borrowed. That's what's changed. There ain't no money tree.[/p][/quote]Why do you say we have no money left when we give the EU 9.4 billion, we spent 300 million a day on Libya, 0.7% of GDP to other countries who have their own aid program and are due to spend 100 billion on the update of trident. Also Osbourne is promising more money to the IMF to bail out Greece and Italy. You sound like somebody who is just bitter and twisted and can't see the bigger picture here. Do you work? If so, how would you like your employer turning round to you tomorrow and saying sorry Jackie we cant afford to pay you what we promised you today we can only afford £2 an hour. I know what you would say. How was you educated I wonder? Was you born in an hospital? Do you have your bins emptied? These are some of the things your paying for, I earn what the going rate is for doing that job. I then, out of that money I have earned pay into a pension that was offered to me when I sold my labour to the government. I don't hear you harping on about what your beloved Tory PM is on and how he is going to reduce his. Your just a sad individual and I wish you had been down there on the megaphone because I will guarantee it would have been stuck up where the sun don't shine. Hopping mad
  • Score: 0

4:37pm Thu 1 Dec 11

Jack Herer says...

Their employers are the tax payer, not the last Labour government who were signing blank cheques they could never pay. I don't remember the tax payer ever agreeing to grossly unfair pensions because they are the ones that actually have to pay.

The world has changed. There can no longer be a bottomless pit of money. It's unfair on those that have to pay. The contract was written by a bunch of power hungry goons who would have promised you anything for your vote. It is completely unsustainable for those who have to pay though.

Apparently public sector pension pots are overflowing however. Therefore it is in the best interests of everyone if they were detached from tax payer burden.

It's win win. No more sponging off the majority who can't afford to pay anyway and you'll have more money anyway, apparently.

You cannot justify this wrong with other wrongs either - from foreign aid to bankers to politicians. 2 wrongs never make a right. Why should those in the private sector be shafted by all those things, and then get shafted by paying someone else's bloated pension? How bizarrely selfish. Why would that make them any different to the bankers if that was your justification?
Their employers are the tax payer, not the last Labour government who were signing blank cheques they could never pay. I don't remember the tax payer ever agreeing to grossly unfair pensions because they are the ones that actually have to pay. The world has changed. There can no longer be a bottomless pit of money. It's unfair on those that have to pay. The contract was written by a bunch of power hungry goons who would have promised you anything for your vote. It is completely unsustainable for those who have to pay though. Apparently public sector pension pots are overflowing however. Therefore it is in the best interests of everyone if they were detached from tax payer burden. It's win win. No more sponging off the majority who can't afford to pay anyway and you'll have more money anyway, apparently. You cannot justify this wrong with other wrongs either - from foreign aid to bankers to politicians. 2 wrongs never make a right. Why should those in the private sector be shafted by all those things, and then get shafted by paying someone else's bloated pension? How bizarrely selfish. Why would that make them any different to the bankers if that was your justification? Jack Herer
  • Score: 0

5:06pm Thu 1 Dec 11

Jack Herer says...

Hopping mad wrote:
Jack Herer wrote:
Allan Whitehead wrote:
Strikes and Pickets Why,
Well many years ago when we had child labour, some forward progressive organisations, began to think it was wrong to have children working at 11, 12 and 13 years of age.
Therefore, they agitated until the Government of the day altered the rules slightly, and allowed children to go to school and be educated. However, this was much against the grain with many members of parliament. Then one day, it was realised by the people they were being used to make Mill and Foundry Owners very rich, so when they became old, they would not want.
Because of being educated, the workers began to realise, they also reached a time when the mill, and foundry owners, no longer needed their services, because, they could not maintain the previous stamina they had shown when younger. Then came the great wars, and many took part in these fights for freedom. After, these wars came another breed of persons one who would stand up for themselves. (Possibly, due to the fact, they had seen how powerful they had been, when they all grouped together for a particular cause) If it had worked during the great wars, why not in peacetime?
Following, many others who would receive pensions for their service. Regular Soldiers, Policemen, Bankers, unions very slowly achieved pensions for manual workers, we already had the state pension, now works pensions became into being, and many workers contributed to provide themselves with a pension for their elderly years. Now because the public sectors appear to be at the upper end of the scale, having negotiated their conditions, and agreed them, with their so-called bosses. Someone wishes to change the rules. Why?
Simple we can't afford to pay anymore.

The figures were conceived by Gordon Brown who's reckless non-regulation of the banks has brought the country to it's knees, and also had forecasts based on the money tree he thought the bankers, who he was knighting in droves, had found.

There was no money tree. There is no money. We are currently borrowing and borrowing and borrowing. Billions upon billions upon billions. Outside of countries on the brink like Greece and Ireland and Portugal, we have the biggest debt. It's because we were doing similarly things spending under Labour. All borrowed.

That's what's changed. There ain't no money tree.
Why do you say we have no money left when we give the EU 9.4 billion, we spent 300 million a day on Libya, 0.7% of GDP to other countries who have their own aid program and are due to spend 100 billion on the update of trident. Also Osbourne is promising more money to the IMF to bail out Greece and Italy.

You sound like somebody who is just bitter and twisted and can't see the bigger picture here. Do you work? If so, how would you like your employer turning round to you tomorrow and saying sorry Jackie we cant afford to pay you what we promised you today we can only afford £2 an hour. I know what you would say.

How was you educated I wonder?
Was you born in an hospital?
Do you have your bins emptied?

These are some of the things your paying for, I earn what the going rate is for doing that job. I then, out of that money I have earned pay into a pension that was offered to me when I sold my labour to the government.

I don't hear you harping on about what your beloved Tory PM is on and how he is going to reduce his.

Your just a sad individual and I wish you had been down there on the megaphone because I will guarantee it would have been stuck up where the sun don't shine.
My beloved Tory PM? I'm sorry but you have me very much mistaken for someone else.

The politician choice we have in this country is Hobson's choice. None of them are perfect and most are far from it.

That means doubly that you should discard the lies you have been told by the last Labour government. There was no money tree. The bankers were lying. We shouldn't have knighted them. We shouldn't have even believed them. We certainly shouldn't have mortgaged the country with excruciating debt based on their same madness model.

That's what happened though. That was Gordon Brown's and Tony Blair's llegacy. Welcome to the real world. Wake up and smell the coffee. Public sector pensions are unfair and unsustainable. Disgustingly so. Especially to swathes of low paid private sector workers with no pension.
[quote][p][bold]Hopping mad[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Jack Herer[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Allan Whitehead[/bold] wrote: Strikes and Pickets Why, Well many years ago when we had child labour, some forward progressive organisations, began to think it was wrong to have children working at 11, 12 and 13 years of age. Therefore, they agitated until the Government of the day altered the rules slightly, and allowed children to go to school and be educated. However, this was much against the grain with many members of parliament. Then one day, it was realised by the people they were being used to make Mill and Foundry Owners very rich, so when they became old, they would not want. Because of being educated, the workers began to realise, they also reached a time when the mill, and foundry owners, no longer needed their services, because, they could not maintain the previous stamina they had shown when younger. Then came the great wars, and many took part in these fights for freedom. After, these wars came another breed of persons one who would stand up for themselves. (Possibly, due to the fact, they had seen how powerful they had been, when they all grouped together for a particular cause) If it had worked during the great wars, why not in peacetime? Following, many others who would receive pensions for their service. Regular Soldiers, Policemen, Bankers, unions very slowly achieved pensions for manual workers, we already had the state pension, now works pensions became into being, and many workers contributed to provide themselves with a pension for their elderly years. Now because the public sectors appear to be at the upper end of the scale, having negotiated their conditions, and agreed them, with their so-called bosses. Someone wishes to change the rules. Why?[/p][/quote]Simple we can't afford to pay anymore. The figures were conceived by Gordon Brown who's reckless non-regulation of the banks has brought the country to it's knees, and also had forecasts based on the money tree he thought the bankers, who he was knighting in droves, had found. There was no money tree. There is no money. We are currently borrowing and borrowing and borrowing. Billions upon billions upon billions. Outside of countries on the brink like Greece and Ireland and Portugal, we have the biggest debt. It's because we were doing similarly things spending under Labour. All borrowed. That's what's changed. There ain't no money tree.[/p][/quote]Why do you say we have no money left when we give the EU 9.4 billion, we spent 300 million a day on Libya, 0.7% of GDP to other countries who have their own aid program and are due to spend 100 billion on the update of trident. Also Osbourne is promising more money to the IMF to bail out Greece and Italy. You sound like somebody who is just bitter and twisted and can't see the bigger picture here. Do you work? If so, how would you like your employer turning round to you tomorrow and saying sorry Jackie we cant afford to pay you what we promised you today we can only afford £2 an hour. I know what you would say. How was you educated I wonder? Was you born in an hospital? Do you have your bins emptied? These are some of the things your paying for, I earn what the going rate is for doing that job. I then, out of that money I have earned pay into a pension that was offered to me when I sold my labour to the government. I don't hear you harping on about what your beloved Tory PM is on and how he is going to reduce his. Your just a sad individual and I wish you had been down there on the megaphone because I will guarantee it would have been stuck up where the sun don't shine.[/p][/quote]My beloved Tory PM? I'm sorry but you have me very much mistaken for someone else. The politician choice we have in this country is Hobson's choice. None of them are perfect and most are far from it. That means doubly that you should discard the lies you have been told by the last Labour government. There was no money tree. The bankers were lying. We shouldn't have knighted them. We shouldn't have even believed them. We certainly shouldn't have mortgaged the country with excruciating debt based on their same madness model. That's what happened though. That was Gordon Brown's and Tony Blair's llegacy. Welcome to the real world. Wake up and smell the coffee. Public sector pensions are unfair and unsustainable. Disgustingly so. Especially to swathes of low paid private sector workers with no pension. Jack Herer
  • Score: 0

6:21pm Thu 1 Dec 11

The Curator says...

JACK HERER

No reports yet as to how you got on with your megaphone and your disgraceful "greedy selfish pigs "
accusation .

There are very many low paid public sector workers , ,so according to your logic you think it is ok to steal money from their pockets /pensions etc ?. This in some way, according to you to make up for **** ups by the previous government . Whilst fat cats get richer and richer .

Theres loads of money out there it is just not going to be allowed to filter down to the ordinary working person , who has worked their buts off all their days ,whilst others have sat on handouts .

No more of your political clap trap please as most of us have had enough .
I like many are fine in my real world , perhaps you would like to join us .It's great and full of realism and we don't approve of pinching cash from low paid .
JACK HERER No reports yet as to how you got on with your megaphone and your disgraceful "greedy selfish pigs " accusation . There are very many low paid public sector workers , [not the "gold plated "ones you go on about ] ,so according to your logic you think it is ok to steal money from their pockets /pensions etc ?. This in some way, according to you to make up for **** ups by the previous government . Whilst fat cats get richer and richer . Theres loads of money out there it is just not going to be allowed to filter down to the ordinary working person , who has worked their buts off all their days ,whilst others have sat on handouts . No more of your political clap trap please as most of us have had enough . I like many are fine in my real world , perhaps you would like to join us .It's great and full of realism and we don't approve of pinching cash from low paid . The Curator
  • Score: 0

7:19pm Thu 1 Dec 11

Jack Herer says...

The Curator wrote:
JACK HERER

No reports yet as to how you got on with your megaphone and your disgraceful "greedy selfish pigs "
accusation .

There are very many low paid public sector workers , ,so according to your logic you think it is ok to steal money from their pockets /pensions etc ?. This in some way, according to you to make up for **** ups by the previous government . Whilst fat cats get richer and richer .

Theres loads of money out there it is just not going to be allowed to filter down to the ordinary working person , who has worked their buts off all their days ,whilst others have sat on handouts .

No more of your political clap trap please as most of us have had enough .
I like many are fine in my real world , perhaps you would like to join us .It's great and full of realism and we don't approve of pinching cash from low paid .
Really? Brilliant, then you must be disgusted at the millions and millions of seriously low paid private sector workers who are forced to pay huge amounts of their hard earned money going on other people's pensions.

They have no pension themselves but they are expected to pay for hugely obscene one's for other people. In this rotten system they are expected to pay all the pensions for those that "deserve it", right up to the fat cats executives at the top of councils, who award themselves big pay rises at the end of their careers to get some of the highest public sector pensions in all Europe.

Those fat cats, like vast swathes of other well paid public sector workers, are getting richer and richer. Is that the fat cats you are talking about?

Is it right that low paid private sector workers, already struggling, have to pay for these?

It's bizarre because the truth is you seem to completely approve of pinching cash from those low paid, even though you say you don't.

It's funny that. The truth is you keep those fat cats getting richer and richer while the average person who is paying struggles more and more.
[quote][p][bold]The Curator[/bold] wrote: JACK HERER No reports yet as to how you got on with your megaphone and your disgraceful "greedy selfish pigs " accusation . There are very many low paid public sector workers , [not the "gold plated "ones you go on about ] ,so according to your logic you think it is ok to steal money from their pockets /pensions etc ?. This in some way, according to you to make up for **** ups by the previous government . Whilst fat cats get richer and richer . Theres loads of money out there it is just not going to be allowed to filter down to the ordinary working person , who has worked their buts off all their days ,whilst others have sat on handouts . No more of your political clap trap please as most of us have had enough . I like many are fine in my real world , perhaps you would like to join us .It's great and full of realism and we don't approve of pinching cash from low paid .[/p][/quote]Really? Brilliant, then you must be disgusted at the millions and millions of seriously low paid private sector workers who are forced to pay huge amounts of their hard earned money going on other people's pensions. They have no pension themselves but they are expected to pay for hugely obscene one's for other people. In this rotten system they are expected to pay all the pensions for those that "deserve it", right up to the fat cats executives at the top of councils, who award themselves big pay rises at the end of their careers to get some of the highest public sector pensions in all Europe. Those fat cats, like vast swathes of other well paid public sector workers, are getting richer and richer. Is that the fat cats you are talking about? Is it right that low paid private sector workers, already struggling, have to pay for these? It's bizarre because the truth is you seem to completely approve of pinching cash from those low paid, even though you say you don't. It's funny that. The truth is you keep those fat cats getting richer and richer while the average person who is paying struggles more and more. Jack Herer
  • Score: 0

12:18am Fri 2 Dec 11

maggie-T says...

Blackburn Realist wrote:
Jack Herer wrote:
The Curator wrote:
JACK HERER

Some of your usual nonsense i see .

I have suggestion for you . Next time you are passing your local school ,why don't you pop in and call them "greedy selfish pigs " . Your words not mine from a previous post i noticed . Maybe you could also try this at the hospital or GP's surgery perhaps ,when you next need their help . You also could nip out next collection day and see how your bin men take to your "greedy selfish pigs " accusation .
Let us know how you get on please .
I'd love to be on a megaphone today. I'd gladly go round every single picket line to tell them all to their faces.

Someone needs to.
Jealous little hater! Regardless of whether you think it wrong or right that the public sector workers get a "gold plated" pension or not,the fact is they should get what they signed up for. It's wrong and immoral that this government want to take away what is rightfully theirs. You go to the picket lines and have your say and I guarantee you would be put right and hopefully have some of your ignorance knocked out of you.
We should all get what we signed up for, we, the producers of the country lost our pensions when Gordon browns (fair) labour party stole our pensions, he ruined every final salary scheme in the country, we never heard a peep out of you selfish bstads then did we?
If you think that a married couple on minimum wage should support your early retirement while they work theirselves into an early grave to pay for it, you must be crazy, the fact is there is no money to pay for your over inflated jobs, never mind your pensions, you need to get in the real world and thank the hard working taxpayers of this country for keeping you in the non-jobs that you do, heaven help you lot if you had to work for a living, the fact is, you don't create wealth, we pay your wage, you don't pay tax because you don't actually earn money, your not a realist, a fantasist yes, the whole walkout organised by the fascist left and mainly obeyed by a large percentage of women who had no idea why they were going on strike, wait til payday, the whole thing was a failure, laughable, everything ran smoothly, if anything, you selfish idiots have just proved that we could sack another 2 million without any disruption to services, well said Jeremy clarkson!!
Your only saying what the rest of us are thinking!!
[quote][p][bold]Blackburn Realist[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Jack Herer[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]The Curator[/bold] wrote: JACK HERER Some of your usual nonsense i see . I have suggestion for you . Next time you are passing your local school ,why don't you pop in and call them "greedy selfish pigs " . Your words not mine from a previous post i noticed . Maybe you could also try this at the hospital or GP's surgery perhaps ,when you next need their help . You also could nip out next collection day and see how your bin men take to your "greedy selfish pigs " accusation . Let us know how you get on please .[/p][/quote]I'd love to be on a megaphone today. I'd gladly go round every single picket line to tell them all to their faces. Someone needs to.[/p][/quote]Jealous little hater! Regardless of whether you think it wrong or right that the public sector workers get a "gold plated" pension or not,the fact is they should get what they signed up for. It's wrong and immoral that this government want to take away what is rightfully theirs. You go to the picket lines and have your say and I guarantee you would be put right and hopefully have some of your ignorance knocked out of you.[/p][/quote]We should all get what we signed up for, we, the producers of the country lost our pensions when Gordon browns (fair) labour party stole our pensions, he ruined every final salary scheme in the country, we never heard a peep out of you selfish bstads then did we? If you think that a married couple on minimum wage should support your early retirement while they work theirselves into an early grave to pay for it, you must be crazy, the fact is there is no money to pay for your over inflated jobs, never mind your pensions, you need to get in the real world and thank the hard working taxpayers of this country for keeping you in the non-jobs that you do, heaven help you lot if you had to work for a living, the fact is, you don't create wealth, we pay your wage, you don't pay tax because you don't actually earn money, your not a realist, a fantasist yes, the whole walkout organised by the fascist left and mainly obeyed by a large percentage of women who had no idea why they were going on strike, wait til payday, the whole thing was a failure, laughable, everything ran smoothly, if anything, you selfish idiots have just proved that we could sack another 2 million without any disruption to services, well said Jeremy clarkson!! Your only saying what the rest of us are thinking!! maggie-T
  • Score: 0

9:15am Fri 2 Dec 11

Joseph Yossarian says...

""". Whilst fat cats get richer and richer ."""

pot & kettle!

For example Derek Simpson, former head of UNITE, and his farewell package of £519,347.


Big Bowl of Whiskas for him (and his final salary pension, paid for by UNITE members)

!!
""". Whilst fat cats get richer and richer .""" pot & kettle! For example Derek Simpson, former head of UNITE, and his farewell package of £519,347. Big Bowl of Whiskas for him (and his final salary pension, paid for by UNITE members) !! Joseph Yossarian
  • Score: 0

11:30am Fri 2 Dec 11

Elegant1 says...

DCI wrote:
These people (public sector workers) also pay taxes and are now facing years of near pay freeze. With inflation running so high this effectively means a sustained and brutal pay cut.

I'm not surprised some of the less enlightened private sector workers are falling for the Con-Dems ploy to divide and conquer by setting public sector against private sector. In REALITY, only the rich will be ammune from these cuts in living standards.

Do you really want a 68 year old paramedic extricating you from an upturned car, or our children taught by elderly teachers who are unable and frankly too knackered to control a classroom? Of course in reality this wont happen because these hard working professionals will be forced to retire on sick grounds well before that age (at greater expense to the taxpayer).
Well said! If those who speak against the srike are realistic they would realise what this government is capable of! I have lived in many places and know that a Tory government is for the wealthier aspect of society. Not the working class wether ithat class is working or not!
[quote][p][bold]DCI[/bold] wrote: These people (public sector workers) also pay taxes and are now facing years of near pay freeze. With inflation running so high this effectively means a sustained and brutal pay cut. I'm not surprised some of the less enlightened private sector workers are falling for the Con-Dems ploy to divide and conquer by setting public sector against private sector. In REALITY, only the rich will be ammune from these cuts in living standards. Do you really want a 68 year old paramedic extricating you from an upturned car, or our children taught by elderly teachers who are unable and frankly too knackered to control a classroom? Of course in reality this wont happen because these hard working professionals will be forced to retire on sick grounds well before that age (at greater expense to the taxpayer).[/p][/quote]Well said! If those who speak against the srike are realistic they would realise what this government is capable of! I have lived in many places and know that a Tory government is for the wealthier aspect of society. Not the working class wether ithat class is working or not! Elegant1
  • Score: 0

11:54am Fri 2 Dec 11

Elegant1 says...

Jack Herer wrote:
The Curator wrote:
JACK HERER

Some of your usual nonsense i see .

I have suggestion for you . Next time you are passing your local school ,why don't you pop in and call them "greedy selfish pigs " . Your words not mine from a previous post i noticed . Maybe you could also try this at the hospital or GP's surgery perhaps ,when you next need their help . You also could nip out next collection day and see how your bin men take to your "greedy selfish pigs " accusation .
Let us know how you get on please .
I'd love to be on a megaphone today. I'd gladly go round every single picket line to tell them all to their faces.

Someone needs to.
It is comments like this that cause problems. If you understand the situation of the striker's try to understand what has led them to take the actions they do! many PS are on very average or poor salaries. they cannot afford to have their wages "fixed" to help balance the books. They are trying to survive! It is you that needs a dose of reality!
[quote][p][bold]Jack Herer[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]The Curator[/bold] wrote: JACK HERER Some of your usual nonsense i see . I have suggestion for you . Next time you are passing your local school ,why don't you pop in and call them "greedy selfish pigs " . Your words not mine from a previous post i noticed . Maybe you could also try this at the hospital or GP's surgery perhaps ,when you next need their help . You also could nip out next collection day and see how your bin men take to your "greedy selfish pigs " accusation . Let us know how you get on please .[/p][/quote]I'd love to be on a megaphone today. I'd gladly go round every single picket line to tell them all to their faces. Someone needs to.[/p][/quote]It is comments like this that cause problems. If you understand the situation of the striker's try to understand what has led them to take the actions they do! many PS are on very average or poor salaries. they cannot afford to have their wages "fixed" to help balance the books. They are trying to survive! It is you that needs a dose of reality! Elegant1
  • Score: 0

5:26pm Fri 2 Dec 11

julespent says...

Jack Herer you didnt reply to my post? You are not listening to what people are saying. I will be paying into a pension scheme for 50 years and this government wants me to receive less than £100 per week. This is why as a woman i went on strike. I am a hard working woman. During my working life I have wiped backsides, worked on peace work in a factory. What is my tax paying for? Lets hope you dont need NHS treatment, please write your full name and date of birth and then we can leave you in the gutter when you need medical treatment. When you get older lets hope you are able to wipe your own ars*
Jack Herer you didnt reply to my post? You are not listening to what people are saying. I will be paying into a pension scheme for 50 years and this government wants me to receive less than £100 per week. This is why as a woman i went on strike. I am a hard working woman. During my working life I have wiped backsides, worked on peace work in a factory. What is my tax paying for? Lets hope you dont need NHS treatment, please write your full name and date of birth and then we can leave you in the gutter when you need medical treatment. When you get older lets hope you are able to wipe your own ars* julespent
  • Score: 0

7:25pm Fri 2 Dec 11

The Curator says...

julespent wrote:
Jack Herer you didnt reply to my post? You are not listening to what people are saying. I will be paying into a pension scheme for 50 years and this government wants me to receive less than £100 per week. This is why as a woman i went on strike. I am a hard working woman. During my working life I have wiped backsides, worked on peace work in a factory. What is my tax paying for? Lets hope you dont need NHS treatment, please write your full name and date of birth and then we can leave you in the gutter when you need medical treatment. When you get older lets hope you are able to wipe your own ars*
Cracking post

Yes Jacko seems to have gone quiet ,which is perhaps not a bad thing . He is probably getting together his next anti public sector posting .
I like you don't want anything for nothing just a reasonable reflection on my many years of paying in to a superan scheme as a lowish paid worker . I do though object to Jack's suggestion that low paid public sector workers pensions are somehow being subsidised by the private sector .
[quote][p][bold]julespent[/bold] wrote: Jack Herer you didnt reply to my post? You are not listening to what people are saying. I will be paying into a pension scheme for 50 years and this government wants me to receive less than £100 per week. This is why as a woman i went on strike. I am a hard working woman. During my working life I have wiped backsides, worked on peace work in a factory. What is my tax paying for? Lets hope you dont need NHS treatment, please write your full name and date of birth and then we can leave you in the gutter when you need medical treatment. When you get older lets hope you are able to wipe your own ars*[/p][/quote]Cracking post Yes Jacko seems to have gone quiet ,which is perhaps not a bad thing . He is probably getting together his next anti public sector posting . I like you don't want anything for nothing just a reasonable reflection on my many years of paying in to a superan scheme as a lowish paid worker . I do though object to Jack's suggestion that low paid public sector workers pensions are somehow being subsidised by the private sector . The Curator
  • Score: 0

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