Bosses plan major expansion of Rossendale windfarm

Lancashire Telegraph: NOW Scout Moor windfarm NOW Scout Moor windfarm

THE largest on-shore windfarm in the UK could be about to spread its reach even further.

Plans have been unveiled by Peel Energy to expand the Scout Moor windfarm near Edenfield, which is already home to 26 giant turbines.

But after months of controversy, generated when the original development opened in September 2008, Peel bosses have been urged to talk to residents.

Householders protested that their foundations were placed in peril the last time transporters, containing the huge turbines and blades, rolled through the Valley.

Council leader Coun Alyson Barnes said: “There is already a major presence at Scout Moor, and while I’m supportive of renewable energy, I hope that Peel will be sensitive to those living at that end of the valley.

“I know they are committed to a high level of consultation with residents and this will be necessary.

“People living there had to put up with a high level of disruption and it would seem that the turbines would be delivered via a similar path as last time.”

Bosses at Peel say the existing turbines generated 153,000 kilowatt hours in 2009 and nearly 132,000 kwh in 2010 - more than enough to accommodate Rossendale’s entire energy needs in a year and around 40 per cent of neighbouring Rochdale’s.

Jon England, Peel spokesman, said: “The existing wind farm has consistently generated large amounts of electricity, despite the fact that the UK has experienced a period of lower wind speeds over the last couple of years.

“The public open days and school visits have also been very popular and have helped dispel the myths associated with wind power.”

Unlike previous applications, the wind farm proposals will not be voted upon by Rossendale or Rochdale councils but the Infastructure Planning Commission, a government quango established to deal with such major projects.

Comments (4)

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12:23am Thu 18 Aug 11

Pan-cake says...

"The existing wind farm has consistently generated large amounts of electricity" - at what cost to the consumer/tax payer?
They still haven't found a fix for having to have fossil fuelled powerstations ticking over, waiting to replace the windmill output when the wind drops.
As with figures quoted - a conventional powerstation will have to have be run up to provide the 19000 kwh reduction in 2010 (v 2009) because the wind didn't blow - as is usual when we have a winter high over the UK which means high energy demand and near freezing temperatures.
"The existing wind farm has consistently generated large amounts of electricity" - at what cost to the consumer/tax payer? They still haven't found a fix for having to have fossil fuelled powerstations ticking over, waiting to replace the windmill output when the wind drops. As with figures quoted - a conventional powerstation will have to have be run up to provide the 19000 kwh reduction in 2010 (v 2009) because the wind didn't blow - as is usual when we have a winter high over the UK which means high energy demand and near freezing temperatures. Pan-cake

10:11am Thu 18 Aug 11

Coeur de Lion says...

The answer is nuclear power stations which aren't subject to the vagaries of nature.
The answer is nuclear power stations which aren't subject to the vagaries of nature. Coeur de Lion

7:56pm Thu 18 Aug 11

hamneggs says...

To me the current 26 turbine wind farm was only ever going to be phase 1
of a much larger plan. The access roads are in place and listening to current quotes from serious critics of the original application, there seems to be a resignation that phase 2 will happen like it or not. I'm very much sat on the fence when it comes to wind farms but to be honest the jury is still out regarding their ability to produce clean, cheap energy. The only thing for sure is that they are big, white and turn when the wind blows but switch off again when it blows too hard...and that they are appearing in ever increasing quantities throughout the region.
In my opinion their ability to contribute to saving the planet is still very much in doubt but I personally think that so long as the subsidies exist for erecting and producing the energy from turbines then expansion of Scout Moor to double its current size is inevitable.
As anyone who knows the location will confirm, the existing site only takes up one corner of the huge Rooley Moor between Rossendale and Rochdale and could easily swallow up an expansion.
I personally think that phase 2 will be sited on the Bacup and Whitworth side of the summit which, when the planned turbines at Sharneyford, Reaps Moss and Crook Hill are erected it'll mean we are completely surrounded by them.
Maybe it'll then be time to climb of the fence, or start working in turbine manufacture.
To me the current 26 turbine wind farm was only ever going to be phase 1 of a much larger plan. The access roads are in place and listening to current quotes from serious critics of the original application, there seems to be a resignation that phase 2 will happen like it or not. I'm very much sat on the fence when it comes to wind farms but to be honest the jury is still out regarding their ability to produce clean, cheap energy. The only thing for sure is that they are big, white and turn when the wind blows but switch off again when it blows too hard...and that they are appearing in ever increasing quantities throughout the region. In my opinion their ability to contribute to saving the planet is still very much in doubt but I personally think that so long as the subsidies exist for erecting and producing the energy from turbines then expansion of Scout Moor to double its current size is inevitable. As anyone who knows the location will confirm, the existing site only takes up one corner of the huge Rooley Moor between Rossendale and Rochdale and could easily swallow up an expansion. I personally think that phase 2 will be sited on the Bacup and Whitworth side of the summit which, when the planned turbines at Sharneyford, Reaps Moss and Crook Hill are erected it'll mean we are completely surrounded by them. Maybe it'll then be time to climb of the fence, or start working in turbine manufacture. hamneggs

1:04am Fri 19 Aug 11

lwg76 says...

Oh dear, Too many wind Turbines and not enough mill chimneys left.
Oh dear, Too many wind Turbines and not enough mill chimneys left. lwg76

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