Ribble Valley trees to be felled to stop disease spreading

SITE Larch wood on the banks of Churn Clough Reservoir

SITE Larch wood on the banks of Churn Clough Reservoir

First published in Sabden Lancashire Telegraph: Photograph of the Author by , Crime reporter

WORK has begun to remove diseased trees from two woodland areas near Sabden.

Black Hill and Churn Clough Reservoirs have seen a Ramorum infection spread through the woodlands, meaning an estimated 12,000 larch trees in total need to be felled to stop it spreading.

Contractors will start in Black Hill and remove between 300 and 400 tonnes of timber, which should take around a week.

They will then move on to Churn Clough, where they expect to remove the whole larch wood, around 2,000 tons of timber, in six weeks.

The footpath through Churn Clough will be closed and there will be temporary parking restrictions in Stubbins Lane during the work.

Ramorum disease is caused by a fungus-like pathogen and is particularly serious in Japanese larch trees and rhododendron.

The felled areas will be replanted with trees that are native to the area and the infected timber will be chipped and used for poultry bedding or firewood.

Dr John Morgan, head of the Forestry Commission’s Plant Health Service, said: "These new cases are cause for concern because they represent further evidence of the disease spreading to larch.

“We cannot be sure of the full implications of these outbreaks yet. Overall, the number and area of outbreaks on larch that we are finding this year are down on the previous two years.”

“However, these outbreaks in new regions demonstrate that the threat posed by this disease is still serious. "Anyone who suspects they have seen its symptoms should report it to us without delay.”

Coun Tim Ashton, Lancashire County Council cabinet member for highways and transport, said: "This is an important piece of work.”

Comments (9)

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11:54am Thu 9 Feb 12

Dickiepayshey says...

What are the symptoms we should be looking out for please ?
What are the symptoms we should be looking out for please ? Dickiepayshey
  • Score: 0

1:07pm Thu 9 Feb 12

Your ferret stinks says...

I'm often out rabbitin an i've never seen anythin untowards, exactly what does it look like, a picture would be good or is this just a ploy to stop people protesting against the cutting down of trees now they are mature enough and ready for the purpose they were planted?

Bang goes me pheasant and grouse sunday dinner .....

P.S. Where did you say all the hares were?
I'm often out rabbitin an i've never seen anythin untowards, exactly what does it look like, a picture would be good or is this just a ploy to stop people protesting against the cutting down of trees now they are mature enough and ready for the purpose they were planted? Bang goes me pheasant and grouse sunday dinner ..... P.S. Where did you say all the hares were? Your ferret stinks
  • Score: 0

1:50pm Thu 9 Feb 12

tonygreaves says...

Crown and branch dieback is likely to be present with retained brown needles and multiple resinous lesions. May be present in groups of trees or scattered through the stand.

The disease is Phytopthera ramorum, also (confusingly) known as Sudden Oak Death. Originally spread from imported bushes at garden centres in the SW. Main large trees affected in UK are larches.

Tony Greaves
Crown and branch dieback is likely to be present with retained brown needles and multiple resinous lesions. May be present in groups of trees or scattered through the stand. The disease is Phytopthera ramorum, also (confusingly) known as Sudden Oak Death. Originally spread from imported bushes at garden centres in the SW. Main large trees affected in UK are larches. Tony Greaves tonygreaves
  • Score: 0

2:33pm Thu 9 Feb 12

Dickiepayshey says...

Thanks Tony.
Thanks Tony. Dickiepayshey
  • Score: 0

3:03pm Thu 9 Feb 12

pendle crone says...

The rhodedendrums at Spring Wood, Whalley (just down the road from these larch woods) were diseased some time ago. As this infection spreads between rhodedendrums and larches, probably was Ramorum.

They had all been pulled up with walking restrictions in place when I last went there.

If you google Ramorum, you will probably find pictures of it on the web.

Sad to see the larches go but great if native species are replacing them.
The rhodedendrums at Spring Wood, Whalley (just down the road from these larch woods) were diseased some time ago. As this infection spreads between rhodedendrums and larches, probably was Ramorum. They had all been pulled up with walking restrictions in place when I last went there. If you google Ramorum, you will probably find pictures of it on the web. Sad to see the larches go but great if native species are replacing them. pendle crone
  • Score: 0

5:48pm Thu 9 Feb 12

Steve Rush says...

In the current climate be careful they're not replaced with a large housing estate!!!
In the current climate be careful they're not replaced with a large housing estate!!! Steve Rush
  • Score: 1

6:42pm Thu 9 Feb 12

Yorkshire Dave from gods county says...

Its usually found in the crown of affected trees and low flying spotter planes and helicopters are used to detect it.
Its usually found in the crown of affected trees and low flying spotter planes and helicopters are used to detect it. Yorkshire Dave from gods county
  • Score: 0

6:42pm Thu 9 Feb 12

Yorkshire Dave from gods county says...

Its usually found in the crown of affected trees and low flying spotter planes and helicopters are used to detect it.
Its usually found in the crown of affected trees and low flying spotter planes and helicopters are used to detect it. Yorkshire Dave from gods county
  • Score: 0

7:44pm Thu 9 Feb 12

Your ferret stinks says...

To play devils advocate could this not be a good thing in the respect that nothing ever seems to live underneath a rhododendron due to the density of the plant, and the last i heard there was a problem with rhododendron in and around Snowden affecting the wildlife maybe graft some down there with very close monitoring and see if it can help the biodiversity ?
To play devils advocate could this not be a good thing in the respect that nothing ever seems to live underneath a rhododendron due to the density of the plant, and the last i heard there was a problem with rhododendron in and around Snowden affecting the wildlife maybe graft some down there with very close monitoring and see if it can help the biodiversity ? Your ferret stinks
  • Score: 0

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