Lancashire TelegraphEast Lancashire ambulance crews, doctors and nurses praised following survey (From Lancashire Telegraph)

When news happens, text LT and your photos and videos to 80360. Or contact us by email or phone.

East Lancashire ambulance crews, doctors and nurses praised following survey

AMBULANCE crews and doctors and nurses at East Lancashire Hospitals NHS Trust have been praised by an accident and emergency ward survey.

But improvements are needed, like most hospitals, in telling patients how long they will have to wait for an examination or sending them home with adequate support.

Care Quality Commission (CQC) watchdogs examined A&E services at the East Lancashire trust as part of a national research project and rated various services out of 10.

Nearly 250 patients responded locally and they reserved particular praise for their journey to hospital by ambulance, how paramedics worked with casualty staff, with ratings of nine and above.

People attending A&E were also broadly happy with the answers given by medical workers about their condition.

And between eight and nine out of 10 were satisified that their levels of care and treatment and privacy were up to standard.

But the quality of information about how long people would have to wait in A&E only scored 3.6 out of 10, and advice about how patients could resume their normal lives, after treatment, and whether they had suitable arrangements at home to deal with their condition, was ranked at just 4.3 and 4.1 respectively.

This is in line with the findings at other acute hospital trusts, according to the CQC, which carried out the survey from January to March this year.

Nationwide it was found that patients are having to wait longer - East Lancs Hospitals Trust has skirted around the 95 per cent four-hour target for much of 2012.

David Behan, CQC’s chief executive, said: “The important issue is that people who need to be treated urgently, do not have to wait, it is disappointing therefore that people have said they have to wait longer to be treated than four years ago.

“People should be seen, diagnosed, treated and admitted or discharged as quickly as possible and this is an issue that trusts need to urgently tackle.

“It is however encouraging to see that people’s perceptions of trust in clinicians and cleanliness continuing to be high and more people than ever saying that they have enough privacy when discussing conditions with receptionists.”

Comments (5)

Please log in to enable comment sorting

6:58pm Sat 8 Dec 12

Sajdin says...

About time the staff got praised for the work they do !
About time the staff got praised for the work they do ! Sajdin
  • Score: 0

8:10pm Sat 8 Dec 12

Info-warrior says...

AMBULANCE crews and doctors and nurses at East Lancashire Hospitals NHS Trust have been praised by an accident and emergency ward survey



Dr Peter Carter, chief executive and general secretary of the Royal College of Nursing, and colleagues from other organisations wrote in a letter to The Daily Telegraph that problems in the NHS “must be tackled as a matter of urgency”.
But he points the finger at organisational issues rather than any lack of compassion among doctors, nurses or healthcare assistants.
Last Wednesday Jeremy Hunt, the Health Secretary, told an audience at The King’s Fund that patients were experiencing “coldness, resentment, indifference” and “even contempt” in some hospitals.
He identified poor care as “perhaps the biggest problem of all facing the NHS”.
He said distressing cases were not “isolated incidents” but were in places part of the “fabric”.In the worst hospitals, he said there was "a kind of normalisation of cruelty, where the unacceptable is legitimised and the callous becomes mundane"....

Three cheers for the NHS hip hip another dead, hip hip another dead, hip hip another dead..
AMBULANCE crews and doctors and nurses at East Lancashire Hospitals NHS Trust have been praised by an accident and emergency ward survey Dr Peter Carter, chief executive and general secretary of the Royal College of Nursing, and colleagues from other organisations wrote in a letter to The Daily Telegraph that problems in the NHS “must be tackled as a matter of urgency”. But he points the finger at organisational issues rather than any lack of compassion among doctors, nurses or healthcare assistants. Last Wednesday Jeremy Hunt, the Health Secretary, told an audience at The King’s Fund that patients were experiencing “coldness, resentment, indifference” and “even contempt” in some hospitals. He identified poor care as “perhaps the biggest problem of all facing the NHS”. He said distressing cases were not “isolated incidents” but were in places part of the “fabric”.In the worst hospitals, he said there was "a kind of normalisation of cruelty, where the unacceptable is legitimised and the callous becomes mundane".... Three cheers for the NHS hip hip another dead, hip hip another dead, hip hip another dead.. Info-warrior
  • Score: 0

11:15pm Sat 8 Dec 12

julespent says...

Most staff who work for the NHS do care and want to do their best for the patients, which is why they choose the job that they do and believe me its not an easy one. It comes down to very simple maths, number of patients to treat/care for, versus number of staff. When a child attends a nursery they have a staff to child ratio. This is not the case in the NHS. People nowadays have a lot more complex needs and in some cases complete care. These complex cases years ago would have died. If only it was like 'The Royal' on TV.
I think Info warrior and his brother Jeremy Hunt should work for 6 months on rotating shifts, 14 hour long days combined with 11 hour nights 2 in 2 off 4 in 3 off back in for 3 off for 2 etc and still have compassion for patients (which they do) who grab you, spit at you, throw chairs at you, assault and abuse you whilst you are trying to bathe them at 2am because they are covered in diarrhoea and you are trying your best to look after them. And that is just the tip of the iceberg!
Most staff who work for the NHS do care and want to do their best for the patients, which is why they choose the job that they do and believe me its not an easy one. It comes down to very simple maths, number of patients to treat/care for, versus number of staff. When a child attends a nursery they have a staff to child ratio. This is not the case in the NHS. People nowadays have a lot more complex needs and in some cases complete care. These complex cases years ago would have died. If only it was like 'The Royal' on TV. I think Info warrior and his brother Jeremy Hunt should work for 6 months on rotating shifts, 14 hour long days combined with 11 hour nights 2 in 2 off 4 in 3 off back in for 3 off for 2 etc and still have compassion for patients (which they do) who grab you, spit at you, throw chairs at you, assault and abuse you whilst you are trying to bathe them at 2am because they are covered in diarrhoea and you are trying your best to look after them. And that is just the tip of the iceberg! julespent
  • Score: 0

6:12pm Sun 9 Dec 12

mavrick says...

Every body knows the staff in the hospitals are under a lot more stress than ever before. Nursing and being a Doctor was a vocation not a job, big difference. The cuts in the NHS budget is killing the service, The ambulance service in Manchester is up for privatisation at the moment. Bids for the tender have already been completed. When you have a national organisation like the NHS there is always room for improvement somewhere. If anybody has doubts about the NHS I suggest a trip across to the USA and become ill and seek help. I think this would cause people to change their view on the NHS. It is up to all of us to make our voices heard for the sake of the NHS.
Every body knows the staff in the hospitals are under a lot more stress than ever before. Nursing and being a Doctor was a vocation not a job, big difference. The cuts in the NHS budget is killing the service, The ambulance service in Manchester is up for privatisation at the moment. Bids for the tender have already been completed. When you have a national organisation like the NHS there is always room for improvement somewhere. If anybody has doubts about the NHS I suggest a trip across to the USA and become ill and seek help. I think this would cause people to change their view on the NHS. It is up to all of us to make our voices heard for the sake of the NHS. mavrick
  • Score: 0

11:12pm Mon 10 Dec 12

VicLou says...

julespent wrote:
Most staff who work for the NHS do care and want to do their best for the patients, which is why they choose the job that they do and believe me its not an easy one. It comes down to very simple maths, number of patients to treat/care for, versus number of staff. When a child attends a nursery they have a staff to child ratio. This is not the case in the NHS. People nowadays have a lot more complex needs and in some cases complete care. These complex cases years ago would have died. If only it was like 'The Royal' on TV.
I think Info warrior and his brother Jeremy Hunt should work for 6 months on rotating shifts, 14 hour long days combined with 11 hour nights 2 in 2 off 4 in 3 off back in for 3 off for 2 etc and still have compassion for patients (which they do) who grab you, spit at you, throw chairs at you, assault and abuse you whilst you are trying to bathe them at 2am because they are covered in diarrhoea and you are trying your best to look after them. And that is just the tip of the iceberg!
Fully agree!
[quote][p][bold]julespent[/bold] wrote: Most staff who work for the NHS do care and want to do their best for the patients, which is why they choose the job that they do and believe me its not an easy one. It comes down to very simple maths, number of patients to treat/care for, versus number of staff. When a child attends a nursery they have a staff to child ratio. This is not the case in the NHS. People nowadays have a lot more complex needs and in some cases complete care. These complex cases years ago would have died. If only it was like 'The Royal' on TV. I think Info warrior and his brother Jeremy Hunt should work for 6 months on rotating shifts, 14 hour long days combined with 11 hour nights 2 in 2 off 4 in 3 off back in for 3 off for 2 etc and still have compassion for patients (which they do) who grab you, spit at you, throw chairs at you, assault and abuse you whilst you are trying to bathe them at 2am because they are covered in diarrhoea and you are trying your best to look after them. And that is just the tip of the iceberg![/p][/quote]Fully agree! VicLou
  • Score: 0

Comments are closed on this article.

click2find

About cookies

We want you to enjoy your visit to our website. That's why we use cookies to enhance your experience. By staying on our website you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more about the cookies we use.

I agree