Family says father ‘immobile and scarcely speaks’ after ‘unacceptable’ treatment at Blackburn Hospital

James Taylor

Hazel Berry says her dad had ‘unacceptable’ care at Blackburn hospital

First published in News
Last updated
Lancashire Telegraph: Photograph of the Author by , Health Reporter

HEALTH bosses have apologised to a former Rossendale councillor and his family after they complained about a string of failings in his care.

The family of James Taylor, who has asthma and Alzheimer’s Disease, were left shocked by the ‘unacceptable’ level of care at the Royal Blackburn Hospital, where he was admitted after falling at his care home in Helmshore.

Their main complaint centred on his asthma inhalers, which daughter Hazel Berry said she gave to staff in the emergency department, but then took five days to be delivered to ward C24, where the 86-year-old had been transferred.

Since his fall Mr Taylor, a former Rawtenstall councillor in the 1970s, has been immobile and non-communicative, and Hazel believes the absence of his inhalers over those days may have contributed to his deterioration.

Hazel, 53, from Water in Rossendale, also claims:

  • She found her dad had been lying in soiled clothes for about 24 hours;
  • He was given apples to eat, despite not having teeth;
  • She was never told which doctor was in charge of his care;
  • When she phoned the ward to check his condition, a staff member said Mr Taylor ‘wasn’t her patient’ and hung up.

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Mr Taylor, a retired joiner, of Haslingden Hall Residential Care Home, in Lancaster Avenue, was under the care of East Lancashire Hospitals NHS Trust (ELHT) for nine days after being admitted to the Royal Blackburn on March 1.

His family said he was kept in hospital because he was too weak and frail to be discharged.

Hazel, her brother Andrew and sister Sheena have submitted a formal complaint to the trust, but said they have still not been offered a meeting with the medics in charge of his care.

Hazel added: “The care he got was just not acceptable. Our dad was fine before all this, you could have a laugh and a joke with him, but he’s totally immobile now and you’re lucky if you can get six words out of him.

“His medication should have been sent with him to the ward.”

Deputy chief nurse, Julie Molyneaux, said the trust has had two meetings and regular correspondence with the family.

She added: “We have apologised for the regretful shortcomings in our service and we developed an action plan to minimise the risk of similar occurrences happening in the future, which we shared with the family.

“This was subsequently changed at their request and the amended version shared with them. We are greatly appreciative of Mr Taylor’s family sharing their feelings and their father’s experience with us in order that we can learn from it.”

Comments (6)

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10:40am Tue 3 Jun 14

Izanears says...

He was given apples to eat, despite not having teeth;
The first time I was in hospital I had a meeting with the Catering manager during which I suggested that when people were given an apple, they also gave a knife so it could be peeled or at least cut into slices for easier eating. I was assured that this would happen. When I was in hospital the second time, nothing had changed. I often wonder why I (and others) bother to complain as no one wants to listen.
He was given apples to eat, despite not having teeth; The first time I was in hospital I had a meeting with the Catering manager during which I suggested that when people were given an apple, they also gave a knife so it could be peeled or at least cut into slices for easier eating. I was assured that this would happen. When I was in hospital the second time, nothing had changed. I often wonder why I (and others) bother to complain as no one wants to listen. Izanears
  • Score: 24

10:48am Tue 3 Jun 14

padihamgirl says...

nothing changes my mother passed away in 2011 in blackburn hospital she couldnt understand some of the staff so they shouted as if that would make a difference. I was in the day ward myself recently and before i left i was asked to fill out a questionaire about my stay. How can you be honest when the nurses are stood next to you?
nothing changes my mother passed away in 2011 in blackburn hospital she couldnt understand some of the staff so they shouted as if that would make a difference. I was in the day ward myself recently and before i left i was asked to fill out a questionaire about my stay. How can you be honest when the nurses are stood next to you? padihamgirl
  • Score: 19

10:51am Tue 3 Jun 14

woolywords says...

I won't hear another bad word spoken against St Elsewhere..
Oops, Blackburn Royal Hospital, I meant to say.

My friend was feeling unwell, so rushed himself to A and E, knowing that any delay, in waiting for an ambulance, could mean his death.
(Tricky things, those aortic leaks, you only get to know that it is one, when you are dead.)
So, as I was saying, he rushed himself to the hospital, got seen to and has survived!
However, he only parked his car, on the lines, taking up two parking places.
Those nice men at the BRH, moved his car, so that it was between the lines, then gave him a ticket, for 'illegal' parking.
My eternal thanks for the neat parking, early diagnosis and the ice cream that I ate.
You really can't make this stuff up, no matter how erudite that you are.

Huge thanks to Dave, in the parking office, who has a sense of humour about these things, and waived the parking charges.
Nice one, Dave!
I won't hear another bad word spoken against St Elsewhere.. Oops, Blackburn Royal Hospital, I meant to say. My friend was feeling unwell, so rushed himself to A and E, knowing that any delay, in waiting for an ambulance, could mean his death. (Tricky things, those aortic leaks, you only get to know that it is one, when you are dead.) So, as I was saying, he rushed himself to the hospital, got seen to and has survived! However, he only parked his car, on the lines, taking up two parking places. Those nice men at the BRH, moved his car, so that it was between the lines, then gave him a ticket, for 'illegal' parking. My eternal thanks for the neat parking, early diagnosis and the ice cream that I ate. You really can't make this stuff up, no matter how erudite that you are. Huge thanks to Dave, in the parking office, who has a sense of humour about these things, and waived the parking charges. Nice one, Dave! woolywords
  • Score: 16

12:09pm Tue 3 Jun 14

woolywords says...

Sometimes, being so well read, is a bit scary..
It states, 'An aortic aneurysm is a general term for an enlargement (dilation) of the aorta to greater than 1.5 times normal size. While the cause of an aneurysm may be multifactorial, the end result is an underlying weakness in the wall of the aorta at that location. The aneurysm may occasionally cause pain, which is a sign of impending rupture. When rupture occurs, massive internal hemorrhage results, and, unless treated immediately, shock and death can occur within minutes.'
Aren't you glad that you read that?
As it puts the parking thing, into a perspective of it's own.
I think that I'll take a box of chocolate biscuits to Dave..

Aortic aneurysm, who'd have thought of that, in the old windbag?
Sometimes, you have to be grateful, that these doctors speak foreign languages, like Latin, as you won't find that, in any dialect that I know of..
Sometimes, being so well read, is a bit scary.. It states, 'An aortic aneurysm is a general term for an enlargement (dilation) of the aorta to greater than 1.5 times normal size. While the cause of an aneurysm may be multifactorial, the end result is an underlying weakness in the wall of the aorta at that location. The aneurysm may occasionally cause pain, which is a sign of impending rupture. When rupture occurs, massive internal hemorrhage results, and, unless treated immediately, shock and death can occur within minutes.' Aren't you glad that you read that? As it puts the parking thing, into a perspective of it's own. I think that I'll take a box of chocolate biscuits to Dave.. Aortic aneurysm, who'd have thought of that, in the old windbag? Sometimes, you have to be grateful, that these doctors speak foreign languages, like Latin, as you won't find that, in any dialect that I know of.. woolywords
  • Score: -13

4:58pm Tue 3 Jun 14

moxhie says...

How long is this level of negligence going to continue before someone pulls their finger out and gets the situation in this hospital changed ?
How long is this level of negligence going to continue before someone pulls their finger out and gets the situation in this hospital changed ? moxhie
  • Score: 12

8:44pm Tue 3 Jun 14

Julie Aspin says...

"We are greatly appreciative of Mr Taylor’s family sharing their feelings and their father’s experience with us in order that we can learn from it.”

Just under two years ago we had similar experience at RBH when my dad was serioulsly ill. His story closely mirrors Mr Taylors experience. We had a similar response to our complaints - so why is it still happening ?

My dad made a recovery thanks to real care in a nursing home. RBH would have let him die. Common sense, respect for dignity, and treating people as individuals is lacking. but why do the keep promising to learn from people's experiences and yet nothing changes. Empty words.
"We are greatly appreciative of Mr Taylor’s family sharing their feelings and their father’s experience with us in order that we can learn from it.” Just under two years ago we had similar experience at RBH when my dad was serioulsly ill. His story closely mirrors Mr Taylors experience. We had a similar response to our complaints - so why is it still happening ? My dad made a recovery thanks to real care in a nursing home. RBH would have let him die. Common sense, respect for dignity, and treating people as individuals is lacking. but why do the keep promising to learn from people's experiences and yet nothing changes. Empty words. Julie Aspin
  • Score: 16

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