Burnley horse sanctuary set to expand

Lancashire Telegraph: A new visitor centre is included in the plans A new visitor centre is included in the plans

A POPULAR animal rescue centre has been given the go-ahead to build an extension.

The Horses and Ponies Protection Association (HAPPA) has secured full planning permission for a host of new buildings at its Shores Hey Farm headquarters in Halfax Road, Briercliffe.

The new buildings include a visitor centre, an isolation unit, a machinery store and a crew barn, while the existing indoor arena will be expanded.

No objections were received in relation to the plans and Burnley Council planning officers have said the charity can press on with the project.

A report confirming planning permission said: “In principle, the development is acceptable in the rural area. It will improve an existing horse rescue facility to enable it to function more effectively.

The visitor centre has been designed for purpose and to provide a meeting place and focal point on entry to the site, constructed of vertical timber boarding with a profile grey steel roof and sections of glazing .

“Whilst it is quite contemporary in appearance, the materials are acceptable and the glazed sections would be largely contained within the yard area, not prominent from the wider area.”

A HAPPA spokesperson said: “The proposed redevelopment of Shores Hey Farm will provide the charity with a first-class facility in which they can operate there rescue and rehabilitation efforts from, whilst the visitor centre will hopefully lead to an increased trading income which will help secure the long-term future of the charity.”

Comments (1)

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4:25pm Wed 19 Feb 14

Timefor says...

Probably not very popular but can extending the lives of unwanted animals really be justified in these austere times? Times when folk are struggling to pay bills and to feed and heat themselves. OK, maybe there are a handful of jobs to be provided but, heck, what are the costs involved and who benefits?
Probably not very popular but can extending the lives of unwanted animals really be justified in these austere times? Times when folk are struggling to pay bills and to feed and heat themselves. OK, maybe there are a handful of jobs to be provided but, heck, what are the costs involved and who benefits? Timefor

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