No sex please, we’re from East Lancashire

WHAT A THRILLER! Victoria Haworth, district manager for Hyndburn libraries, with ‘Fifty Shades of Grey’ at Accrington Library.

WHAT A THRILLER! Victoria Haworth, district manager for Hyndburn libraries, with ‘Fifty Shades of Grey’ at Accrington Library.

First published in News
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Lancashire Telegraph: Photograph of the Author by , Crime reporter

WHILE some parts of the country have been getting all hot under the collar reading erotic novel Fifty Shades of Grey, it seems East Lancashire people would prefer to settle down with a ‘whodunnit’. Jessica Cree reports

STEAMY novel Fifty Shades of Grey has proved to be the publishing sensation of the century so far.

But while it has been flying off the shelves of libraries across the country it would seem East Lancashire folk have slightly different tastes when it comes to reading material.

According to market research company Nielson, which surveyed more than half of local authority library services in Britain, the first book in EL James’s triology has proved incredibly popular in the home counties.

In fact, Surrey residents accounted for around one fifth of all library borrowing of the book, which follows college student Anastasia as she starts a relationship with the mysterious millionaire Christian Grey.

But in Blackburn with Darwen, the saucy novel had been taken out just 182 times between May and November last year — representing less than 1 percent of the total adult fiction lending.

In fact readers in the borough were more partial to a good thriller, with The Sixth Man, Innocent and Deliver us From Evil, all by American writer David Baldacci, taking the top three spots for the most lent book during 2012.

During the same period, Fifty Shades was 14th on the list of most popular loans in the authority.

In libraries managed by Lancashire County Council, where there are 114 copies of Fifty Shades of Grey spread across 74 libraries. Demand appeared to be a bit stronger than in Blackburn, and at its peak there were 300 people were on the waiting list to borrow the first installment, with the book being loaned 1,799.

The most popular book of 2012 was the Malkin Child, a book by Livi Michael specially commissioned to mark the 400th anniversary of the Pendle Witches.

It was loaned 6,129 and was followed in popularity by thriller writer James Patterson’s Kill Me if You Can.

Victoria Haworth, district manager for Hyndburn Libraries, said: “In terms of best sellers, Fifty Shades has not gone out as much as other bestsellers might.

“Because of the recession, people are coming to the library perhaps because they can’t afford to buy books.

“People are still going to libraries, we are a free resource.”

She added that Fifty Shades had also proved popular and it was not just your average female reader who was indulging in the so-called ‘mummy porn’.

She said: “I was at the library in Rishton and a gentleman had just returned it.

“He said he had borrowed it for his wife but that he had read a few chapters.

“And it is not even a particular age group who are reading it.

“It is just a passionate love story, although I have to confess I have not read it.

“I have had a look at it and it is not my cup of tea.”

Comments (9)

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5:37pm Wed 30 Jan 13

he6rt6gr6m says...

Borrowing a previously multiply-read adult book from the library? That's... weird...
Borrowing a previously multiply-read adult book from the library? That's... weird... he6rt6gr6m
  • Score: 0

6:48pm Wed 30 Jan 13

woolywords says...

Having read all the hype about the book from various sources, I was more than a little curious about it but no tempted to buy nor lend.
As a more voracious than avid reader, I'd sooner read Catherine Cookson, (and her other nom de plumes) for gritty realism in a novel, having been sent my Mums copy of 50 shades.

Frankly, it's a bit more grown up than the Mills and Boon books of a few years ago and given the relationship that develops between Steele and Grey, it reads as though it's metre is more towards a rush to bed than giving substance to the rest of their lives.
It really doesn't compare to books like Lady Chatterley's Lover or Lolita for any depth of expressed emotional feelings. Where Constance and Mellors move slowly towards fulfillment, with a true sense of, 'oh come on, you know you want to'.. being imbued in the reader, 50 shades lacks any of that, thus fails to live up to the term, a page turner.
Towards the end of the novel, Humbert see his relationship with Lolita for what it is, a robbery of innocence and childhood and this fills him with self-loathing. Whereas in 50 shades, there is none of the inner searching and it's just emotionally as deep, as the ink on the page. Well to see that it's derived or contrived from it's pulp fiction roots.
If I may, might I suggest the original sizzling story to make your blood rush with passions, Bram Stokers, Dracula, since you cannot beat the old books for alluding to the act, rather than trying to describe every suck and thrust. You may have seen many of the movies that it spawned but nothing beats that book, read on a cold Winters night, with gales blowing outside, for making an emotional impact.
Having read all the hype about the book from various sources, I was more than a little curious about it but no tempted to buy nor lend. As a more voracious than avid reader, I'd sooner read Catherine Cookson, (and her other nom de plumes) for gritty realism in a novel, having been sent my Mums copy of 50 shades. Frankly, it's a bit more grown up than the Mills and Boon books of a few years ago and given the relationship that develops between Steele and Grey, it reads as though it's metre is more towards a rush to bed than giving substance to the rest of their lives. It really doesn't compare to books like Lady Chatterley's Lover or Lolita for any depth of expressed emotional feelings. Where Constance and Mellors move slowly towards fulfillment, with a true sense of, 'oh come on, you know you want to'.. being imbued in the reader, 50 shades lacks any of that, thus fails to live up to the term, a page turner. Towards the end of the novel, Humbert see his relationship with Lolita for what it is, a robbery of innocence and childhood and this fills him with self-loathing. Whereas in 50 shades, there is none of the inner searching and it's just emotionally as deep, as the ink on the page. Well to see that it's derived or contrived from it's pulp fiction roots. If I may, might I suggest the original sizzling story to make your blood rush with passions, Bram Stokers, Dracula, since you cannot beat the old books for alluding to the act, rather than trying to describe every suck and thrust. You may have seen many of the movies that it spawned but nothing beats that book, read on a cold Winters night, with gales blowing outside, for making an emotional impact. woolywords
  • Score: 0

9:24pm Wed 30 Jan 13

Rogi says...

Wives of East Lancs blokes need no ****. Lovers born and bred. Every third Saturday after yer bath - whether you want to or not. That's what keeps your missus sweet.
Wives of East Lancs blokes need no ****. Lovers born and bred. Every third Saturday after yer bath - whether you want to or not. That's what keeps your missus sweet. Rogi
  • Score: 0

9:26pm Wed 30 Jan 13

Rogi says...

Rogi wrote:
Wives of East Lancs blokes need no ****. Lovers born and bred. Every third Saturday after yer bath - whether you want to or not. That's what keeps your missus sweet.
(**** = ponr)
[quote][p][bold]Rogi[/bold] wrote: Wives of East Lancs blokes need no ****. Lovers born and bred. Every third Saturday after yer bath - whether you want to or not. That's what keeps your missus sweet.[/p][/quote](**** = ponr) Rogi
  • Score: 0

12:18am Thu 31 Jan 13

useyourhead says...

Rogi wrote:
Rogi wrote:
Wives of East Lancs blokes need no ****. Lovers born and bred. Every third Saturday after yer bath - whether you want to or not. That's what keeps your missus sweet.
(**** = ponr)
I assume the censor blocked the word **** in your first post, which is bizarre as it is used in the article lol.
[quote][p][bold]Rogi[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Rogi[/bold] wrote: Wives of East Lancs blokes need no ****. Lovers born and bred. Every third Saturday after yer bath - whether you want to or not. That's what keeps your missus sweet.[/p][/quote](**** = ponr)[/p][/quote]I assume the censor blocked the word **** in your first post, which is bizarre as it is used in the article lol. useyourhead
  • Score: 0

12:20am Thu 31 Jan 13

useyourhead says...

She added that Fifty Shades had also proved popular and it was not just your average female reader who was indulging in the so-called ‘mummy ****

ooooh will the telegraph self censor lol
She added that Fifty Shades had also proved popular and it was not just your average female reader who was indulging in the so-called ‘mummy **** ooooh will the telegraph self censor lol useyourhead
  • Score: 0

9:39am Thu 31 Jan 13

Blackburn fans love horses says...

Yes but Horse and Hounds was lent out approximately 75000 times during the last month - that is more like it for those Blackburn folks, who needs 50 shades of Grey?
Yes but Horse and Hounds was lent out approximately 75000 times during the last month - that is more like it for those Blackburn folks, who needs 50 shades of Grey? Blackburn fans love horses
  • Score: 0

9:46am Thu 31 Jan 13

Rogi says...

Blackburn fans love horses wrote:
Yes but Horse and Hounds was lent out approximately 75000 times during the last month - that is more like it for those Blackburn folks, who needs 50 shades of Grey?
What?
[quote][p][bold]Blackburn fans love horses[/bold] wrote: Yes but Horse and Hounds was lent out approximately 75000 times during the last month - that is more like it for those Blackburn folks, who needs 50 shades of Grey?[/p][/quote]What? Rogi
  • Score: 0

10:16am Thu 31 Jan 13

notchuffed says...

Rogi wrote:
Wives of East Lancs blokes need no ****. Lovers born and bred. Every third Saturday after yer bath - whether you want to or not. That's what keeps your missus sweet.
Aye but don't fergit to tek thi clogs off afore that gits in wi' 'er tha' might puncture tin bath. Oh aye en all, don't fergit to rinse it out after tha's bin weshin' whippet in it don't, best off tho' is ter git whippet in wi' thi if tha followin' yon book Tha' knows what I means, a sez tha' knows what I means
[quote][p][bold]Rogi[/bold] wrote: Wives of East Lancs blokes need no ****. Lovers born and bred. Every third Saturday after yer bath - whether you want to or not. That's what keeps your missus sweet.[/p][/quote]Aye but don't fergit to tek thi clogs off afore that gits in wi' 'er tha' might puncture tin bath. Oh aye en all, don't fergit to rinse it out after tha's bin weshin' whippet in it don't, best off tho' is ter git whippet in wi' thi if tha followin' yon book Tha' knows what I means, a sez tha' knows what I means notchuffed
  • Score: 0

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