Protests against access road for windfarm near Cliviger

First published in News

A PROTEST against the construction of a windfarm and temporary access road saw hundreds of residents march in formation through their village yesterday.

A 10 metre wide access road is being planned to allow the expansion of Coal Clough Wind Farm, near Cliviger.

But villagers fear that over an 18-week period more than 4,000 wagons movements are expected to allow the expansion.

The lorries are set to travel down the M65, through Burnley, then Red Lees Road.

Alan Pickles, chairman of Cliviger Parish Council, said: “The issue isn’t the wind farm, which people across the country are reluctantly accepted despite the blot on the lanscape they pose.

“It is the massive disruption and nuisance the access road will cause which is what is getting people’s anger up.

“We are being told it will only be temporary, but I don’t believe it will be.”

A meeting in August attended by the developers, ScottishPower: Renewables, the council’s planning officer and 130 residents saw all of the villagers vote unanimously against the plans.

Resident Dee Salmon said: “If this many have turned up on a horrible day like this it shows the determination of our community.

“Most of the roads and buildings here have been here for two centuries. They are not meant for this sort of traffic.”

Cliviger resident, Elaine Howard, 65, said: “I don’t think we need anymore roads or wind turbines.

“We may be one of the largest parishes in the borough, but we have the smallest population.”

“Cliviger is a lovely place and we want to keep it that way.”

Bill Peel, 65, resident, said: “It is going to spoil the environment and the village and we aren’t sure what benefits we as a community will get from it.

“I suspect it will be nothing but aggravation.”

Comments (12)

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6:49pm Mon 31 Dec 12

Mister Red says...

These sort of people don't mind using power from other power stations in other parts of the country,as long as they are not on their own doorstep. i think they are called "NIMBYs" - not in my back yard
These sort of people don't mind using power from other power stations in other parts of the country,as long as they are not on their own doorstep. i think they are called "NIMBYs" - not in my back yard Mister Red
  • Score: 0

7:06pm Mon 31 Dec 12

pwitch says...

Where are the actual figures for electricity production by wind turbines please?
Where are the actual figures for electricity production by wind turbines please? pwitch
  • Score: 0

8:29pm Mon 31 Dec 12

Info-warrior says...

Wind power, as an alternative to fossil fuels, is plentiful, renewable, widely distributed, clean, produces no greenhouse gas emissions during operation and uses little land. Any effects on the environment are generally less problematic than those from other power sources. As of 2011, Denmark is generating more than a quarter of its electricity from wind. 83 countries around the world are using wind power on a commercial basis. In 2010 wind energy production was over 2.5% of total worldwide electricity usage, and growing rapidly at more than 25% per annum. The monetary cost per unit of energy produced is similar to the cost for new coal and natural gas installations. Although wind power is a popular form of energy generation, the construction of wind farms is not universally welcomed due to aesthetics..

At the beginning of September 2012, the installed capacity of wind power in the United Kingdom was 6,858 megawatts (MW), with 357 operational wind farms and 3,873 wind turbines in the United Kingdom. The United Kingdom is ranked as the world's eighth largest producer of wind power.
723 MW of new wind power capacity was brought online during 2011, a 40% decrease on 2010. 2012 is expected to be a significant year for the offshore wind industry with potentially 5 farms becoming operational with over 1,300 MW of generating capability.
Through the Renewables Obligation, British electricity suppliers are now required by law to provide a proportion of their sales from renewable sources such as wind power or pay a penalty fee. The supplier then receives a Renewables Obligation Certificate (ROC) for each MW·h of electricity they have purchased. Within the United Kingdom, wind power is the second largest source of renewable energy after biomass.
Wind power is expected to continue growing in the United Kingdom for the foreseeable future – RenewableUK estimated in 2010 that more than 2,000 MW of capacity would be deployed per year for the next five years. By 2020, the United Kingdom is expected to have more than 28,000 MW of wind capacity.

Gaining planning permission for onshore wind farms continues to prove difficult, with many schemes stalled in the planning system, and a high rate of refusal. The RenewableUK (formerly BWEA) figures show that there are approximately 7,000 MW worth of onshore schemes waiting for planning permission. On average a wind farm planning application takes 2 years to be considered by a local authority, with an approval rate of 40%. This compares extremely unfavourably with other types of major applications, such as housing, retail outlets and roads, 70% of which are decided within the 13–16-week statutory deadline; for wind farms the rate is just 6%. Approximately half of all wind farm planning applications, over 4 GW worth of schemes, have objections from airports and traffic control on account of their impact on radar. In 2008 NATS en Route, the BWEA, the Ministry of Defence and other Government departments signed a Memorandum of Understanding seeking to establish a mechanism for resolving objections and funding for more technical research.
Wind power, as an alternative to fossil fuels, is plentiful, renewable, widely distributed, clean, produces no greenhouse gas emissions during operation and uses little land. Any effects on the environment are generally less problematic than those from other power sources. As of 2011, Denmark is generating more than a quarter of its electricity from wind. 83 countries around the world are using wind power on a commercial basis. In 2010 wind energy production was over 2.5% of total worldwide electricity usage, and growing rapidly at more than 25% per annum. The monetary cost per unit of energy produced is similar to the cost for new coal and natural gas installations. Although wind power is a popular form of energy generation, the construction of wind farms is not universally welcomed due to aesthetics.. At the beginning of September 2012, the installed capacity of wind power in the United Kingdom was 6,858 megawatts (MW), with 357 operational wind farms and 3,873 wind turbines in the United Kingdom. The United Kingdom is ranked as the world's eighth largest producer of wind power. 723 MW of new wind power capacity was brought online during 2011, a 40% decrease on 2010. 2012 is expected to be a significant year for the offshore wind industry with potentially 5 farms becoming operational with over 1,300 MW of generating capability. Through the Renewables Obligation, British electricity suppliers are now required by law to provide a proportion of their sales from renewable sources such as wind power or pay a penalty fee. The supplier then receives a Renewables Obligation Certificate (ROC) for each MW·h of electricity they have purchased. Within the United Kingdom, wind power is the second largest source of renewable energy after biomass. Wind power is expected to continue growing in the United Kingdom for the foreseeable future – RenewableUK estimated in 2010 that more than 2,000 MW of capacity would be deployed per year for the next five years. By 2020, the United Kingdom is expected to have more than 28,000 MW of wind capacity. Gaining planning permission for onshore wind farms continues to prove difficult, with many schemes stalled in the planning system, and a high rate of refusal. The RenewableUK (formerly BWEA) figures show that there are approximately 7,000 MW worth of onshore schemes waiting for planning permission. On average a wind farm planning application takes 2 years to be considered by a local authority, with an approval rate of 40%. This compares extremely unfavourably with other types of major applications, such as housing, retail outlets and roads, 70% of which are decided within the 13–16-week statutory deadline; for wind farms the rate is just 6%. Approximately half of all wind farm planning applications, over 4 GW worth of schemes, have objections from airports and traffic control on account of their impact on radar. In 2008 NATS en Route, the BWEA, the Ministry of Defence and other Government departments signed a Memorandum of Understanding seeking to establish a mechanism for resolving objections and funding for more technical research. Info-warrior
  • Score: 0

8:31pm Mon 31 Dec 12

Bramley Meade Boy says...

Mister Red wrote:
These sort of people don't mind using power from other power stations in other parts of the country,as long as they are not on their own doorstep. i think they are called "NIMBYs" - not in my back yard
There are some sort of people who don't mind criticising others for protesting something that directly affects them but would do exactly the same should the same set of circumstances occur in their vicinity. They are called iNIMBYs - it's not in my backyard.
[quote][p][bold]Mister Red[/bold] wrote: These sort of people don't mind using power from other power stations in other parts of the country,as long as they are not on their own doorstep. i think they are called "NIMBYs" - not in my back yard[/p][/quote]There are some sort of people who don't mind criticising others for protesting something that directly affects them but would do exactly the same should the same set of circumstances occur in their vicinity. They are called iNIMBYs - it's not in my backyard. Bramley Meade Boy
  • Score: 0

9:20pm Mon 31 Dec 12

bikerjohn_uk says...

Bramley Meade Boy wrote:
Mister Red wrote:
These sort of people don't mind using power from other power stations in other parts of the country,as long as they are not on their own doorstep. i think they are called "NIMBYs" - not in my back yard
There are some sort of people who don't mind criticising others for protesting something that directly affects them but would do exactly the same should the same set of circumstances occur in their vicinity. They are called iNIMBYs - it's not in my backyard.
Sorry, but they are NIMBYs, every last one of them. I live in the area and will be affected by the construction of this road, if (and its a big IF) it goes ahead. But I'm prepared to put up with it if it does. It may cause disruption for 6 months or so, I can handle that. I'm afraid that the anti-brigade usually resort to panic-mongering, scare tactics and heresay rather than coming up with a coherent, lucid argument. This lot didn't protest when the original windfarm was built; they didn't protest when Scout Moor went up. But now it's on their doorsteps...oh brother, mind the pitchforks and the flaming brands...
[quote][p][bold]Bramley Meade Boy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Mister Red[/bold] wrote: These sort of people don't mind using power from other power stations in other parts of the country,as long as they are not on their own doorstep. i think they are called "NIMBYs" - not in my back yard[/p][/quote]There are some sort of people who don't mind criticising others for protesting something that directly affects them but would do exactly the same should the same set of circumstances occur in their vicinity. They are called iNIMBYs - it's not in my backyard.[/p][/quote]Sorry, but they are NIMBYs, every last one of them. I live in the area and will be affected by the construction of this road, if (and its a big IF) it goes ahead. But I'm prepared to put up with it if it does. It may cause disruption for 6 months or so, I can handle that. I'm afraid that the anti-brigade usually resort to panic-mongering, scare tactics and heresay rather than coming up with a coherent, lucid argument. This lot didn't protest when the original windfarm was built; they didn't protest when Scout Moor went up. But now it's on their doorsteps...oh brother, mind the pitchforks and the flaming brands... bikerjohn_uk
  • Score: 0

11:15pm Mon 31 Dec 12

prince of darkness says...

Has anyone told the environment that to have wind farms, there has got to be wind. During my recent walks on the moors these so called green power units were all standing like statues. No mention of the backup power generation, that’s got to be provided in the event of no wind days. This is the hidden extra costs for these so called green units. These are a Trojan horse costs they hide don’t divulge to the public. In fact it’s been said that we don’t need any more wind farms from Dept. of Energy. The moors around Lancashire have its fair share skylines altered forever. So it’s not a case of not in our back yard, there here already.
Has anyone told the environment that to have wind farms, there has got to be wind. During my recent walks on the moors these so called green power units were all standing like statues. No mention of the backup power generation, that’s got to be provided in the event of no wind days. This is the hidden extra costs for these so called green units. These are a Trojan horse costs they hide don’t divulge to the public. In fact it’s been said that we don’t need any more wind farms from Dept. of Energy. The moors around Lancashire have its fair share skylines altered forever. So it’s not a case of not in our back yard, there here already. prince of darkness
  • Score: 0

2:54am Tue 1 Jan 13

darwenTower says...

Trojan horse costs?

How much is it costing to clean up when a nuclear plant is decommissioned?

Tap "cost of decommissioning a nuclear power plant" into a search engine and read the horror stories.
Trojan horse costs? How much is it costing to clean up when a nuclear plant is decommissioned? Tap "cost of decommissioning a nuclear power plant" into a search engine and read the horror stories. darwenTower
  • Score: 0

8:46am Tue 1 Jan 13

Info-warrior says...

darwenTower wrote:
Trojan horse costs?

How much is it costing to clean up when a nuclear plant is decommissioned?

Tap "cost of decommissioning a nuclear power plant" into a search engine and read the horror stories.
Alan Pickles, chairman of Cliviger Parish Council, said: “The issue isn’t the wind farm, which people across the country are reluctantly accepted despite the blot on the lanscape they pose....However Alan. There is lots of people who think they're a wonderfull sight and a constant reminder of mans ability to adapt to the changes that humanity as to deal with constantly. Back in the day living in Cliviger was most likely a closed community and had little to do with the surrounding villages and towns. But in the 21st century places like Cliviger will be consumed with the ever increasing growth in populations across the world. It affects everyone not just the city sheeple but every sleepy forgotten village or town.

The consequeces of nuclear power only promotes more wind turbines and other green energy sources and so it should.

We will suffer from cancers of every kind for years decades even centuries before the atmosphere is clear from fall out from the nukes that have been used to date the Chernobyl disaster is widely considered to have been the worst nuclear power plant accident in history, and is one of only two classified as a level 7 event on the International Nuclear Event Scale (the other being the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster in 2011). The battle to contain the contamination and avert a greater catastrophe ultimately involved over 500,000 workers and cost an estimated 18 billion rubles. The official Soviet casualty count of 31 deaths has been disputed, and long-term effects such as cancers and deformities are still being accounted for.

The N.I.M.B.Y.'s don't consider any of these facts when they're playing their silly nonsense objection game to green energy.
[quote][p][bold]darwenTower[/bold] wrote: Trojan horse costs? How much is it costing to clean up when a nuclear plant is decommissioned? Tap "cost of decommissioning a nuclear power plant" into a search engine and read the horror stories.[/p][/quote]Alan Pickles, chairman of Cliviger Parish Council, said: “The issue isn’t the wind farm, which people across the country are reluctantly accepted despite the blot on the lanscape they pose....However Alan. There is lots of people who think they're a wonderfull sight and a constant reminder of mans ability to adapt to the changes that humanity as to deal with constantly. Back in the day living in Cliviger was most likely a closed community and had little to do with the surrounding villages and towns. But in the 21st century places like Cliviger will be consumed with the ever increasing growth in populations across the world. It affects everyone not just the city sheeple but every sleepy forgotten village or town. The consequeces of nuclear power only promotes more wind turbines and other green energy sources and so it should. We will suffer from cancers of every kind for years decades even centuries before the atmosphere is clear from fall out from the nukes that have been used to date the Chernobyl disaster is widely considered to have been the worst nuclear power plant accident in history, and is one of only two classified as a level 7 event on the International Nuclear Event Scale (the other being the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster in 2011). The battle to contain the contamination and avert a greater catastrophe ultimately involved over 500,000 workers and cost an estimated 18 billion rubles. The official Soviet casualty count of 31 deaths has been disputed, and long-term effects such as cancers and deformities are still being accounted for. The N.I.M.B.Y.'s don't consider any of these facts when they're playing their silly nonsense objection game to green energy. Info-warrior
  • Score: 0

2:15pm Tue 1 Jan 13

hi everyone says...

having lived in cliviger for 1987 to 1996 I can only say that these people are beyond change and think there own area should be left untouched everyone who was born outside the village is a outsider grow up and accept that we need to find other sources for power,
having lived in cliviger for 1987 to 1996 I can only say that these people are beyond change and think there own area should be left untouched everyone who was born outside the village is a outsider grow up and accept that we need to find other sources for power, hi everyone
  • Score: 0

3:33pm Tue 1 Jan 13

DaveBurnley says...

“It is the massive disruption and nuisance the access road will cause which is what is getting people’s anger up.

We are being told it will only be temporary, but I don’t believe it will be.”



What does he think the firm is going to do after they've finished, run conducted tours to the site?



It's only for a short time, accept it and find something serious to moan about.
“It is the massive disruption and nuisance the access road will cause which is what is getting people’s anger up. We are being told it will only be temporary, but I don’t believe it will be.” What does he think the firm is going to do after they've finished, run conducted tours to the site? It's only for a short time, accept it and find something serious to moan about. DaveBurnley
  • Score: 0

10:09pm Tue 1 Jan 13

Realistuk says...

The paid activists of the wind industry certainly earn their crust judging by the speed they post comments on here. It does go to prove what a dirty game is being played by the wind industry to make their millions at the expense of the poor that go without heating. One question - if Al Capone was reborn of this age and alcohol prohibition was in force, which career path would he choose - the answer my friend is blowing in the wind!
The paid activists of the wind industry certainly earn their crust judging by the speed they post comments on here. It does go to prove what a dirty game is being played by the wind industry to make their millions at the expense of the poor that go without heating. One question - if Al Capone was reborn of this age and alcohol prohibition was in force, which career path would he choose - the answer my friend is blowing in the wind! Realistuk
  • Score: 0

9:56am Wed 2 Jan 13

darwenTower says...

You mean i should be being paid for being in favour of green energy? Where do I collect my cheque?
You mean i should be being paid for being in favour of green energy? Where do I collect my cheque? darwenTower
  • Score: 0

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