Nelson pensioner counting cost after ceiling collapses

Lancashire Telegraph: Carol Uprichard surveys the collapsed ceiling Carol Uprichard surveys the collapsed ceiling

A PENSIONER could be left thousands of pounds out of pocket after a bedroom ceiling collapsed in a home she had bought just weeks before.

Carol Uprichard, 68, bought a cottage in Leeds Road, Nelson, on December 5.

But this week, half of the bedroom ceiling fell in after some work was carried out in the room.

Carol said: “After the plast-erer had skimmed the bedroom ceiling, I went back the following day and the ceiling had collapsed.

“There had been some heavy bricks stored above the ceiling as part of the insulation, and these have caused the ceiling to cave in when it has become wet.”

The cottages were refurbished by Pendle Council ar-ound six years ago.

“It has left me out of pocket, but my bigger concern is the dangers,” said Carol.

“If other houses here have the same problem, it could be dangerous. The ceiling could collapse on a child.

“It could just need one damp patch on a ceiling for every-thing to come crashing down.”

Carol has contacted Pendle Council, but it has said it is no longer responsible and that its work had been signed off.

Pendle Council’s home improvement manager Matthew Pearson said: “Our contractor finished work on these houses around six years ago and we have no control over what’s gone on since.

“We had a supervisor on site while the work was being done and the work was signed off as being satisfactory.

“Since then, the previous owner may have carried out work on their home which the new owner was not aware of until problems like this come to light.”

Comments (7)

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11:33am Fri 20 Dec 13

useyourhead says...

my guess would be they have stripped wallpaper off then had it skimmed to sort out a few cracks, but the wallpaper was probably the only thing holding it all together. bad luck.
my guess would be they have stripped wallpaper off then had it skimmed to sort out a few cracks, but the wallpaper was probably the only thing holding it all together. bad luck. useyourhead

2:12pm Fri 20 Dec 13

It's a spade! says...

Firstly, why do people over exaggerate? It is patently obvious that "half" of the ceiling hasn't collapsed. To have that reboarded and skimmed will not cost much at all.

If there is a deeper lying problem such as a leak and/or rotten joists then surely these should have been picked up on the survey when she was buying the house.

You would also have thought that any half decent plasterer would have noticed any potential water damage from a previous leak and that the ceiling wouldn't have felt "right" when he was doing it.

Why would you need to re-plaster walls and ceilings only 6 years after a house has been re-furbished?

In what world would you use "heavy bricks " as part of loft insulation? and why would they be "stored" up there. Did nobody stick their head in the loft and have a look to see what was in there? Who knows, there could have been a Rembrandt.

My advice is take legal action against the company who carried out the survey. They should have looked in there and spotted dry rot or wet rot. Unless of course you didn't have a full survey and opted for the cheapest valuation possible. In which case more fool you!
Firstly, why do people over exaggerate? It is patently obvious that "half" of the ceiling hasn't collapsed. To have that reboarded and skimmed will not cost much at all. If there is a deeper lying problem such as a leak and/or rotten joists then surely these should have been picked up on the survey when she was buying the house. You would also have thought that any half decent plasterer would have noticed any potential water damage from a previous leak and that the ceiling wouldn't have felt "right" when he was doing it. Why would you need to re-plaster walls and ceilings only 6 years after a house has been re-furbished? In what world would you use "heavy bricks " as part of loft insulation? and why would they be "stored" up there. Did nobody stick their head in the loft and have a look to see what was in there? Who knows, there could have been a Rembrandt. My advice is take legal action against the company who carried out the survey. They should have looked in there and spotted dry rot or wet rot. Unless of course you didn't have a full survey and opted for the cheapest valuation possible. In which case more fool you! It's a spade!

3:29pm Fri 20 Dec 13

HecticBigBoy says...

I suspect the last two sentences are the facts 'It's a spade'
I suspect the last two sentences are the facts 'It's a spade' HecticBigBoy

7:04pm Fri 20 Dec 13

phil kernot says...

Look at the roof insulation its black caused by water ingress through the roof that's not somthing that's happened over night ,, my advice is either pay for a detailed survey thay cost about £600 or take a good builder with you when your going to buy because he won't miss a trick and he could save you thousands , look at this job it would cost about £450 to put right if roofs ok not thousands ..
Look at the roof insulation its black caused by water ingress through the roof that's not somthing that's happened over night ,, my advice is either pay for a detailed survey thay cost about £600 or take a good builder with you when your going to buy because he won't miss a trick and he could save you thousands , look at this job it would cost about £450 to put right if roofs ok not thousands .. phil kernot

7:08pm Fri 20 Dec 13

phil kernot says...

It's a spade! wrote:
Firstly, why do people over exaggerate? It is patently obvious that "half" of the ceiling hasn't collapsed. To have that reboarded and skimmed will not cost much at all.

If there is a deeper lying problem such as a leak and/or rotten joists then surely these should have been picked up on the survey when she was buying the house.

You would also have thought that any half decent plasterer would have noticed any potential water damage from a previous leak and that the ceiling wouldn't have felt "right" when he was doing it.

Why would you need to re-plaster walls and ceilings only 6 years after a house has been re-furbished?

In what world would you use "heavy bricks " as part of loft insulation? and why would they be "stored" up there. Did nobody stick their head in the loft and have a look to see what was in there? Who knows, there could have been a Rembrandt.

My advice is take legal action against the company who carried out the survey. They should have looked in there and spotted dry rot or wet rot. Unless of course you didn't have a full survey and opted for the cheapest valuation possible. In which case more fool you!
You hit the plasterboard nail on the head lol
[quote][p][bold]It's a spade![/bold] wrote: Firstly, why do people over exaggerate? It is patently obvious that "half" of the ceiling hasn't collapsed. To have that reboarded and skimmed will not cost much at all. If there is a deeper lying problem such as a leak and/or rotten joists then surely these should have been picked up on the survey when she was buying the house. You would also have thought that any half decent plasterer would have noticed any potential water damage from a previous leak and that the ceiling wouldn't have felt "right" when he was doing it. Why would you need to re-plaster walls and ceilings only 6 years after a house has been re-furbished? In what world would you use "heavy bricks " as part of loft insulation? and why would they be "stored" up there. Did nobody stick their head in the loft and have a look to see what was in there? Who knows, there could have been a Rembrandt. My advice is take legal action against the company who carried out the survey. They should have looked in there and spotted dry rot or wet rot. Unless of course you didn't have a full survey and opted for the cheapest valuation possible. In which case more fool you![/p][/quote]You hit the plasterboard nail on the head lol phil kernot

8:54pm Sat 21 Dec 13

willie eckerslike says...

When I lived in the lomeshaye area of nelson, a RAT chewed through a pipe under the upstairs floorboard, this caused a massive bubble on my ceiling downstairs, within a few minutes it all came down, I didn't know I had rats till that point, there were only 6 houses on the row, I was only 11 at the time I will never forget it ?
When I lived in the lomeshaye area of nelson, a RAT chewed through a pipe under the upstairs floorboard, this caused a massive bubble on my ceiling downstairs, within a few minutes it all came down, I didn't know I had rats till that point, there were only 6 houses on the row, I was only 11 at the time I will never forget it ? willie eckerslike

10:37pm Sat 21 Dec 13

Pendlesider says...

I knew this was a 'non-story' as soon as I saw the words 'cottage in Leeds Road, Nelson'. I mean come on, a 'cottage' in Nelson?
only in Nelson would someone use heavy bricks for insulation!
probably to prevent thieves from jumping from attic to attic between houses!
I knew this was a 'non-story' as soon as I saw the words 'cottage in Leeds Road, Nelson'. I mean come on, a 'cottage' in Nelson? only in Nelson would someone use heavy bricks for insulation! probably to prevent thieves from jumping from attic to attic between houses! Pendlesider

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