Funnel cloud caught on camera above Pendle Hill

Lancashire Telegraph: FUNNEL Danny Power's photo FUNNEL Danny Power's photo

RARE funnel clouds were spotted over East Lancashire at the weekend.

This photograph was taken by ‘storm chaser’ Danny Power as he spotted several of the clouds above Pendle Hill on Friday.

Funnel clouds turn in to tornadoes when they touch the ground.

Mr Power, from Blackburn, who runs the website www.natureunleashed.co.uk, said he spotted the funnel cloud while fishing.

He said: “I really couldn't believe what I was seeing.

"The Met Office had forecast a sunny afternoon and here I was witnessing multiple funnel clouds, in rain and strong winds.”

“It is one of the longest funnel clouds I have witnessed in the UK, and it was truly amazing.”

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Comments (4)

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8:42am Wed 27 Jul 11

Alf Hart says...

Storm chaser? Probably more like 'drizzle-chaser' in this part of the world ;0)
Storm chaser? Probably more like 'drizzle-chaser' in this part of the world ;0) Alf Hart

9:01pm Wed 27 Jul 11

Nature Unleashed says...

There are plenty of storms here to chase, fair enough, not all of them produce thunder and lightning, but there are plenty of Cb's which make stunning photos, especially when an anvil and base of the cloud is full of mammatus clouds lit by the setting sun etc.

:)
There are plenty of storms here to chase, fair enough, not all of them produce thunder and lightning, but there are plenty of Cb's which make stunning photos, especially when an anvil and base of the cloud is full of mammatus clouds lit by the setting sun etc. :) Nature Unleashed

9:36pm Wed 27 Jul 11

Malleus Maleficarum says...

They are not that uncommon in the UK TBH nor in the Ribble Valley. If you are a 'stormchaser' you will thus understand why that is in that part of Lancashire.

.

It is also inaccurate to say if it 'touches' the ground it will form a tornado. It has to be a rotating
funnel cloud to do that.

http://www.crh.noaa.
gov/images/mkx/pdf/h
andouts/spotter_do_d
ont.pdf
They are not that uncommon in the UK TBH nor in the Ribble Valley. If you are a 'stormchaser' you will thus understand why that is in that part of Lancashire. . It is also inaccurate to say if it 'touches' the ground it will form a tornado. It has to be a rotating funnel cloud to do that. http://www.crh.noaa. gov/images/mkx/pdf/h andouts/spotter_do_d ont.pdf Malleus Maleficarum

11:24pm Wed 27 Jul 11

Nature Unleashed says...

The topography of the land is key to the amount of funnels that occur across the NW. I see on average over 10 funnels a year, usually closer to 20. The rare thing is them becoming tornadoes or water spouts.

To be fair, I have never seen a non rotating funnel cloud, I have seen plenty of scud which is often mis-judged to have been a funnel cloud.
The topography of the land is key to the amount of funnels that occur across the NW. I see on average over 10 funnels a year, usually closer to 20. The rare thing is them becoming tornadoes or water spouts. To be fair, I have never seen a non rotating funnel cloud, I have seen plenty of scud which is often mis-judged to have been a funnel cloud. Nature Unleashed

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