Burnley dog attack victim: More needs to be done

Lancashire Telegraph: Joy Herd with her Bichon Frise, Marley Joy Herd with her Bichon Frise, Marley

A BURNLEY woman who was subjected to a terrifying attack by four dogs last year said police should do more to combat dangerous breeds.

Joy Hird spoke out after hearing about the tragic death of Blackburn baby Ava-Jayne Marie Corless, who was mauled by a banned Pit Bull Terrier type dog on Monday night.

Joy, 60, was attacked by four dogs, said to be pit-bull and bull mastiff type breeds, in August last year as she walked her Bichon Frise dog, called Marley, near Burnley General Hospital.

She said: “What happened to that poor baby was just terrible. I have no doubt that Ava-Jayne was a very loved baby, you can see that from the photos of her.

“I’m sure that her mother didn’t realise the danger she was putting her daughter in. But people should not have dogs of that nature in their homes, and especially not when they have a baby or young children around.

“These attacks are becoming more and more common and the police just don’t do enough to combat the problem. People just should not be able to keep these types of dangerous dogs.”

She said no one was ever prosecuted for the attack on her and Marley, and the four dogs were allowed to return home.

She added: “When I was attacked it took them an hour to respond to the call and send their team of specially trained officers to the scene. The dogs had me on the ground, but because I wasn’t ‘mauled’ the police didn’t prosecute anybody for the attack.

“These are clearly dangerous dogs, they weren’t provoked by me or Marley – he’s a small timid dog. Imagine if that had been a child instead of me.”

Comments (4)

Please log in to enable comment sorting

4:54am Fri 14 Feb 14

Biggy12 says...

What exactly is a dangerous breed?

It's all properganda,that little white things just as dangerous as a pit bull...Yawn
What exactly is a dangerous breed? It's all properganda,that little white things just as dangerous as a pit bull...Yawn Biggy12

7:45am Fri 14 Feb 14

DaveBurnley says...

Biggy12 wrote:
What exactly is a dangerous breed?

It's all properganda,that little white things just as dangerous as a pit bull...Yawn
Pit bulls are bred for their aggressive nature, they are created to fight. Bichon Frise on the other hand are lap dogs and very gentle.

Do you know anything about dogs?
[quote][p][bold]Biggy12[/bold] wrote: What exactly is a dangerous breed? It's all properganda,that little white things just as dangerous as a pit bull...Yawn[/p][/quote]Pit bulls are bred for their aggressive nature, they are created to fight. Bichon Frise on the other hand are lap dogs and very gentle. Do you know anything about dogs? DaveBurnley

8:47am Fri 14 Feb 14

rudis_dad says...

Biggy12 wrote:
What exactly is a dangerous breed?

It's all properganda,that little white things just as dangerous as a pit bull...Yawn
Dangerous Dogs Act 1991 - it is illegal to breed from, sell or exchange specifically pit bull terriers; Japanese Tosas; any dog appearing to the Secretary of State to be bred specifically for fighting or aggressive character; or any dog appearing to the Secretary of State to pose an especial danger to the general public.

Assuming you are actually interested, which your general level of ignorance would suggest otherwise.
[quote][p][bold]Biggy12[/bold] wrote: What exactly is a dangerous breed? It's all properganda,that little white things just as dangerous as a pit bull...Yawn[/p][/quote]Dangerous Dogs Act 1991 - it is illegal to breed from, sell or exchange specifically pit bull terriers; Japanese Tosas; any dog appearing to the Secretary of State to be bred specifically for fighting or aggressive character; or any dog appearing to the Secretary of State to pose an especial danger to the general public. Assuming you are actually interested, which your general level of ignorance would suggest otherwise. rudis_dad

2:55am Mon 17 Feb 14

Three fingered Ewood fan says...

There are certain identifying features of what is colloquially known as a knob head, one of these being in possession of an aggressive dog.

Note I don't use the word 'owner' as this suggests an element of responsibility.
There are certain identifying features of what is colloquially known as a knob head, one of these being in possession of an aggressive dog. Note I don't use the word 'owner' as this suggests an element of responsibility. Three fingered Ewood fan

Comments are closed on this article.

click2find

About cookies

We want you to enjoy your visit to our website. That's why we use cookies to enhance your experience. By staying on our website you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more about the cookies we use.

I agree