Lancashire TelegraphPolice posed as 'rogue' traders to catch Burnley drug dealer (From Lancashire Telegraph)

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Police posed as 'rogue' traders to catch Burnley drug dealer

Lancashire Telegraph: JAILED Carl Bond JAILED Carl Bond

UNDERCOVER police posed as ‘rogue’ market traders to catch drug dealers in Burnley, a court was told.

Detectives set up a bedding stall on the town’s market and sold sportwear from the back of a van on the Burnley Wood estate.

Burnley Crown Court was told officers soon became friendly with 29-year-old Carl Bond.

Bond, from Reed Street, initially bought a pair of trainers from the two ‘traders’ and gave them his mobile phone number.

Prosecutor Sarah Statham said the officers talked to Bond about cannabis and he told them he was due to receive around 170 plants.

He offered to sell them some, initially wanting around £2 for a smaller cannabis plant and £5 for a larger specimen.

Bond even told the officers that one of his previous crops had been lost in a police raid, the court heard.

Miss Statham said the undercover officers went to Bond’s home and bought three plants for £30 and he gave them advice about growing cannabis, along with some fertiliser.

Bond would go on to supply the officers with £20 bags of cannabis on four other occasions through November and December.

Later the officers asked Bond for an ounce of ‘blue cheese’ cannabis.

He said he could not supply that but offered them some of his own stash for £160.

The officers declined and just bought another £20 bag.

The undercover officers had no further contact with Bond but did receive a text from him offering to supply some ‘sick green’ cannabis.

Joanne Rodikis, defending, said: “There was temptation put in Mr Bond’s way but he did not go out looking for opportunities to sell the drug.”

Bond believed he was dealing with fellow drug users at the time and he had smoked cannabis with the officers, she told the court.

The profits from drug dealing did not fund an ‘extravagant’ lifestyle but paid for groceries for himself, his partner and their young baby, she added.

Bond admitted one charge of offering to supply cannabis and five offences of supplying cannabis.

He was jailed for 14 months by Judge Robert Altham.

Miss Statham said that a number of youths had already been dealt with by the juveniles courts in relation to Operation Loreley.

Two other Burnley Wood men, Eric Halson and Joshua Bonney, who set up their Springfield Road home as a ‘burglars bazaar’ were jailed for 45 months each, as part of the same crackdown.

The pair raided homes across Burnley, Rossendale and Todmorden and sold on burgled goods from the property But they were caught out when they sold stolen cars to undercover police.

The operation, from September 2010 to April 2011 saw 56 arrests and 35 people charged with 178 offences.

Twelve more are awaiting decisions on whether they are charged.

More than 140 of the 524 items of stolen property seized have been returned to their owners.

Det Sgt Pauline Tyrell said while the operation initially focused on prolific burglars it had also uncovered drug-dealing.

She added: “The operation has also highlighted how close the link is between serious acquisitive crime and the use and supply of illegal drugs, particularly cannabis.

“It should be emphasised that people who supply such substances contribute to the chain of events which lead to victims of such crimes, and as such we are pleased with today’s result.”

Comments (22)

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9:18am Tue 23 Aug 11

useyourhead says...

love the defence Joanne, how do you sleep at night? how do you not gag on the words as they come out? Of course we are to believe he would never have sold it if the officer hadn't 'tempted' him, laughable!
love the defence Joanne, how do you sleep at night? how do you not gag on the words as they come out? Of course we are to believe he would never have sold it if the officer hadn't 'tempted' him, laughable! useyourhead
  • Score: 0

9:31am Tue 23 Aug 11

Taylor Housing says...

Another piece of human filth off the streets. It's a pity he'll be out again in five minutes and no doubt back to his usual ways. Why not just get a job - the Poles don't seem to have a problem getting work?
Another piece of human filth off the streets. It's a pity he'll be out again in five minutes and no doubt back to his usual ways. Why not just get a job - the Poles don't seem to have a problem getting work? Taylor Housing
  • Score: 0

3:05pm Tue 23 Aug 11

Peter-Reynolds says...

Taking this story at face value, it is an appalling tale of police corruption and wasted public resources.
As for the nasty, vicious and deeply prejudiced comments above, I despair at these sad and self-righteous numpties who would embarrass themselves less if they kept their foul opinions to themselves. "Taylor Housing" deserves a little ritual humiliation for his disgusting language. You'd fit in very well with the BNP or the EDL with an attitude like yours.
Taking this story at face value, it is an appalling tale of police corruption and wasted public resources. As for the nasty, vicious and deeply prejudiced comments above, I despair at these sad and self-righteous numpties who would embarrass themselves less if they kept their foul opinions to themselves. "Taylor Housing" deserves a little ritual humiliation for his disgusting language. You'd fit in very well with the BNP or the EDL with an attitude like yours. Peter-Reynolds
  • Score: 0

4:05pm Tue 23 Aug 11

useyourhead says...

Peter-Reynolds wrote:
Taking this story at face value, it is an appalling tale of police corruption and wasted public resources.
As for the nasty, vicious and deeply prejudiced comments above, I despair at these sad and self-righteous numpties who would embarrass themselves less if they kept their foul opinions to themselves. "Taylor Housing" deserves a little ritual humiliation for his disgusting language. You'd fit in very well with the BNP or the EDL with an attitude like yours.
As you refer to comments plural and there are only two, please explain why you feel I was nasty, vicious or prejudiced.
[quote][p][bold]Peter-Reynolds[/bold] wrote: Taking this story at face value, it is an appalling tale of police corruption and wasted public resources. As for the nasty, vicious and deeply prejudiced comments above, I despair at these sad and self-righteous numpties who would embarrass themselves less if they kept their foul opinions to themselves. "Taylor Housing" deserves a little ritual humiliation for his disgusting language. You'd fit in very well with the BNP or the EDL with an attitude like yours.[/p][/quote]As you refer to comments plural and there are only two, please explain why you feel I was nasty, vicious or prejudiced. useyourhead
  • Score: 0

4:29pm Tue 23 Aug 11

Mister Red says...

the reporter obviously does not know Burnley.There is no estate in Burnley Wood.
He is the same reporter who thought that Standish Street is a path that joins the Central railway staion to the retail park that contains Sainsbury's and PC world in his article about Sweetens bookshop's recent move.
the reporter obviously does not know Burnley.There is no estate in Burnley Wood. He is the same reporter who thought that Standish Street is a path that joins the Central railway staion to the retail park that contains Sainsbury's and PC world in his article about Sweetens bookshop's recent move. Mister Red
  • Score: 0

5:49pm Tue 23 Aug 11

midas says...

Taylor Housing are landlords in Burnley Wood so, to be fair, they have a vested interest in improving that area.
.
It does however seem to be a sledgehammer to crack a nut! Undercover officers taking drugs with the defendant all for £130 worth of cannabis?
.
The value of plants seem to fluctuate as well. We had a story of a police officer in Pendle and the plants were worth about £1500 each!
Taylor Housing are landlords in Burnley Wood so, to be fair, they have a vested interest in improving that area. . It does however seem to be a sledgehammer to crack a nut! Undercover officers taking drugs with the defendant all for £130 worth of cannabis? . The value of plants seem to fluctuate as well. We had a story of a police officer in Pendle and the plants were worth about £1500 each! midas
  • Score: 0

5:51pm Tue 23 Aug 11

Peter-Reynolds says...

Why don't we try taking a completely new approach to this problem? At least six million people in Britain use cannabis regularly and whatever we do we're not going to stop them. We waste billions every year on police, court and prison resources when a large proportion of society uses cannabis without any problem at all. In fact, the only real problem with cannabis is that it's illegal. The risks to health are very small - much, much less than alcohol or tobacco. By a recent analysis of mortality, hospital admissions, toxicity and propensity to psychosis, cannabis is nearly 3000 times safer than alcohol. Why not introduce a tax and regulate system and realise the benefits? That way we'd have a properly regulated supply chain with no criminals involved, no theft of electricity, no human trafficking, no destruction of property and disruption of neighbourhoods. Then there would be some control over this huge market. There would be thousands of new jobs, sales would be from licensed outlets to adults only with guaranteed quality and safety. Then our police could start going after some real wrongdoing instead of trying to fight a crime that exists only because of a misguided government policy.
Why don't we try taking a completely new approach to this problem? At least six million people in Britain use cannabis regularly and whatever we do we're not going to stop them. We waste billions every year on police, court and prison resources when a large proportion of society uses cannabis without any problem at all. In fact, the only real problem with cannabis is that it's illegal. The risks to health are very small - much, much less than alcohol or tobacco. By a recent analysis of mortality, hospital admissions, toxicity and propensity to psychosis, cannabis is nearly 3000 times safer than alcohol. Why not introduce a tax and regulate system and realise the benefits? That way we'd have a properly regulated supply chain with no criminals involved, no theft of electricity, no human trafficking, no destruction of property and disruption of neighbourhoods. Then there would be some control over this huge market. There would be thousands of new jobs, sales would be from licensed outlets to adults only with guaranteed quality and safety. Then our police could start going after some real wrongdoing instead of trying to fight a crime that exists only because of a misguided government policy. Peter-Reynolds
  • Score: 0

5:55pm Tue 23 Aug 11

midas says...

Sorry - £3750 each!!!
.
http://www.lancashir
etelegraph.co.uk/new
s/pendle/9190315.Pen
dle_officer_s_pride_
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nds_total___1_5m/
Sorry - £3750 each!!! . http://www.lancashir etelegraph.co.uk/new s/pendle/9190315.Pen dle_officer_s_pride_ as_cannabis_plant_fi nds_total___1_5m/ midas
  • Score: 0

6:10pm Tue 23 Aug 11

Mulvey says...

Joanne Rodikis, defending, said: “There was temptation put in Mr Bond’s way but he did not go out looking for opportunities to sell the drug.”

This would make it entrapment, something I would not put past Lancashire Constabulary or any member of the Police, the largest organised crime unit in the country. Where is the problem in this man selling a harmless plant to provide for his family, aside from the money being void of taxation for obvious reasons. The country could benefit from BILLIONS of pounds as a result of regulation and taxation of cannabis, a highly beneficial plant which is enjoyed by millions of otherwise law abiding British citizens every day.

The law regarding drugs in the UK has got beyond a joke and is holding the country back, progressive drug laws could bring much more regulation to the system which currently allows children of any age to score cannabis from criminals and inject money into organised crime, when will this country open their eyes and realise that they are being lied to by a Government more interested in corporate profits than the good of the people they apparently represent.
Joanne Rodikis, defending, said: “There was temptation put in Mr Bond’s way but he did not go out looking for opportunities to sell the drug.” This would make it entrapment, something I would not put past Lancashire Constabulary or any member of the Police, the largest organised crime unit in the country. Where is the problem in this man selling a harmless plant to provide for his family, aside from the money being void of taxation for obvious reasons. The country could benefit from BILLIONS of pounds as a result of regulation and taxation of cannabis, a highly beneficial plant which is enjoyed by millions of otherwise law abiding British citizens every day. The law regarding drugs in the UK has got beyond a joke and is holding the country back, progressive drug laws could bring much more regulation to the system which currently allows children of any age to score cannabis from criminals and inject money into organised crime, when will this country open their eyes and realise that they are being lied to by a Government more interested in corporate profits than the good of the people they apparently represent. Mulvey
  • Score: 0

6:11pm Tue 23 Aug 11

Mulvey says...

Joanne Rodikis, defending, said: “There was temptation put in Mr Bond’s way but he did not go out looking for opportunities to sell the drug.”

This would make it entrapment, something I would not put past Lancashire Constabulary or any member of the Police, the largest organised crime unit in the country. Where is the problem in this man selling a harmless plant to provide for his family, aside from the money being void of taxation for obvious reasons. The country could benefit from BILLIONS of pounds as a result of regulation and taxation of cannabis, a highly beneficial plant which is enjoyed by millions of otherwise law abiding British citizens every day.

The law regarding drugs in the UK has got beyond a joke and is holding the country back, progressive drug laws could bring much more regulation to the system which currently allows children of any age to score cannabis from criminals and inject money into organised crime, when will this country open their eyes and realise that they are being lied to by a Government more interested in corporate profits than the good of the people they apparently represent.
Joanne Rodikis, defending, said: “There was temptation put in Mr Bond’s way but he did not go out looking for opportunities to sell the drug.” This would make it entrapment, something I would not put past Lancashire Constabulary or any member of the Police, the largest organised crime unit in the country. Where is the problem in this man selling a harmless plant to provide for his family, aside from the money being void of taxation for obvious reasons. The country could benefit from BILLIONS of pounds as a result of regulation and taxation of cannabis, a highly beneficial plant which is enjoyed by millions of otherwise law abiding British citizens every day. The law regarding drugs in the UK has got beyond a joke and is holding the country back, progressive drug laws could bring much more regulation to the system which currently allows children of any age to score cannabis from criminals and inject money into organised crime, when will this country open their eyes and realise that they are being lied to by a Government more interested in corporate profits than the good of the people they apparently represent. Mulvey
  • Score: 0

6:32pm Tue 23 Aug 11

DaveCz says...

About the first two comments, I feel the people who wrote them need to get their priorities in order. Why condemn the man selling harmless plants, but say nothing about the two men actually robbing people? That's a much more serious offence, with actual victims who are probably rather distressed with what's happened to them. They are people which this article should be focused on, not someone who's activities are deem illegal due to (quoting Mr Reynolds) "a misguided government policy."
About the first two comments, I feel the people who wrote them need to get their priorities in order. Why condemn the man selling harmless plants, but say nothing about the two men actually robbing people? That's a much more serious offence, with actual victims who are probably rather distressed with what's happened to them. They are people which this article should be focused on, not someone who's activities are deem illegal due to (quoting Mr Reynolds) "a misguided government policy." DaveCz
  • Score: 0

6:35pm Tue 23 Aug 11

DaveCz says...

Just to make it clear, I mean the burglars, not the people who wrote the comments. Before someone misinterprets, who I think this article should be focused on.
Just to make it clear, I mean the burglars, not the people who wrote the comments. Before someone misinterprets, who I think this article should be focused on. DaveCz
  • Score: 0

7:12pm Tue 23 Aug 11

David Hart says...

"Another piece of human filth off the streets. It's a pity he'll be out again in five minutes and no doubt back to his usual ways. Why not just get a job?"

Um... he did have a job. His job was selling cannabis. The fact that our government have chosen to criminalise this form of economic activity is a symptom of just how misguided and hypocritical they are. If you read the article again, may I direct to where it says: "The profits from drug dealing did not fund an ‘extravagant’ lifestyle but paid for groceries for himself, his partner and their young baby". He was working to keep his family fed. He was not stealing from anyone, mugging, defrauding or embezzling, nor forcing cannabis on anyone who wasn't a willing buyer. What he was doing in selling cannabis was not in any meaningful way different from someone who earns their living selling alcohol or tobacco - indeed, given what we know about the relative dangers of those three drugs, anyone who thinks that cannabis dealers deserve to be punished and yet isn't calling for alcohol and tobacco to be added to the list of prohibited drugs is at best badly under-researched, at worst an unashamed hypocrite who is perfectly comfortable with the idea that the law should be used to enforce their own personal prejudices.

Let the police go after genuine victim-creating criminals, people the public needs protected from. In the 50s, they wasted their time hunting homosexuals, and in ages past the resources of the criminal law were squandered chasing catholics, blasphemers and accused witches. Minority drug users are today's victims of the resources of the state being used to persecute those whose only crime is non-violent, consensual behaviour which happens to offend the sensitivities of some people in power, but which do not victimise anyone.

It's high time we stopped prosecuting imaginary crimes, and regulated the trade in all recreational drugs with public health and human rights, not punitive 'thou-shalt-not' puritanism as our guiding principles.
"Another piece of human filth off the streets. It's a pity he'll be out again in five minutes and no doubt back to his usual ways. Why not just get a job?" Um... he did have a job. His job was selling cannabis. The fact that our government have chosen to criminalise this form of economic activity is a symptom of just how misguided and hypocritical they are. If you read the article again, may I direct to where it says: "The profits from drug dealing did not fund an ‘extravagant’ lifestyle but paid for groceries for himself, his partner and their young baby". He was working to keep his family fed. He was not stealing from anyone, mugging, defrauding or embezzling, nor forcing cannabis on anyone who wasn't a willing buyer. What he was doing in selling cannabis was not in any meaningful way different from someone who earns their living selling alcohol or tobacco - indeed, given what we know about the relative dangers of those three drugs, anyone who thinks that cannabis dealers deserve to be punished and yet isn't calling for alcohol and tobacco to be added to the list of prohibited drugs is at best badly under-researched, at worst an unashamed hypocrite who is perfectly comfortable with the idea that the law should be used to enforce their own personal prejudices. Let the police go after genuine victim-creating criminals, people the public needs protected from. In the 50s, they wasted their time hunting homosexuals, and in ages past the resources of the criminal law were squandered chasing catholics, blasphemers and accused witches. Minority drug users are today's victims of the resources of the state being used to persecute those whose only crime is non-violent, consensual behaviour which happens to offend the sensitivities of some people in power, but which do not victimise anyone. It's high time we stopped prosecuting imaginary crimes, and regulated the trade in all recreational drugs with public health and human rights, not punitive 'thou-shalt-not' puritanism as our guiding principles. David Hart
  • Score: 0

7:24pm Tue 23 Aug 11

useyourhead says...

useyourhead wrote:
love the defence Joanne, how do you sleep at night? how do you not gag on the words as they come out? Of course we are to believe he would never have sold it if the officer hadn't 'tempted' him, laughable!
I was more aiming criticism at defence lawyers in general and wondering how they must have to swallow bile when clearly defending the guilty, the fact that he was selling weed was never an issue, I partake of the herb myself so I agree that it should be legalised, under current law though he is seen as having offended and I was amused at the attempt to justify it, that's all.
[quote][p][bold]useyourhead[/bold] wrote: love the defence Joanne, how do you sleep at night? how do you not gag on the words as they come out? Of course we are to believe he would never have sold it if the officer hadn't 'tempted' him, laughable![/p][/quote]I was more aiming criticism at defence lawyers in general and wondering how they must have to swallow bile when clearly defending the guilty, the fact that he was selling weed was never an issue, I partake of the herb myself so I agree that it should be legalised, under current law though he is seen as having offended and I was amused at the attempt to justify it, that's all. useyourhead
  • Score: 0

7:34pm Tue 23 Aug 11

handytrim says...

Sounds like entrapment to me! I want to know more about the ins and outs of this stall the police set up. Did they make any profit? How much of OUR money did they spend on stock or were the goods counterfeit which they'd previously seized and now sold to an unsuspecting public? Scandalous! Sounds like lazy police work mixed with a bit of Derek Trotter!

Obviously there is a link between cannabis and crime as criminal gangs are the main group of people who grow and sell cannabis. These gangs are usually associated with a number of other criminal activities from human trafficking to murder.

But there are those who choose to enjoy using cannabis recreationally in a responsible way (around 6 million of them in the UK) who are also deemed criminals and more importantly there are those who use cannabis for its pain reliving qualities such as MS and cancer patients who are also currently criminals.

Maybe it is time we took it away from organised crime! Regulated and controlled its distribution (stop it being sold to children!!) and made some money for the debit ridden country in the process with lovely tax. At very least it should be made available to those that want to use its medicinal qualities opposed to toxic pharmaceuticals.
Sounds like entrapment to me! I want to know more about the ins and outs of this stall the police set up. Did they make any profit? How much of OUR money did they spend on stock or were the goods counterfeit which they'd previously seized and now sold to an unsuspecting public? Scandalous! Sounds like lazy police work mixed with a bit of Derek Trotter! Obviously there is a link between cannabis and crime as criminal gangs are the main group of people who grow and sell cannabis. These gangs are usually associated with a number of other criminal activities from human trafficking to murder. But there are those who choose to enjoy using cannabis recreationally in a responsible way (around 6 million of them in the UK) who are also deemed criminals and more importantly there are those who use cannabis for its pain reliving qualities such as MS and cancer patients who are also currently criminals. Maybe it is time we took it away from organised crime! Regulated and controlled its distribution (stop it being sold to children!!) and made some money for the debit ridden country in the process with lovely tax. At very least it should be made available to those that want to use its medicinal qualities opposed to toxic pharmaceuticals. handytrim
  • Score: 0

7:43pm Tue 23 Aug 11

Psychologist says...

I have to agree with most of the comments here, selling cannabis should be licensed... The real criminals in this story are those that steal other people's possessions.... By all means lock them away.
Cannabis however should be brought under government control, there is no doubt about it.
I have to agree with most of the comments here, selling cannabis should be licensed... The real criminals in this story are those that steal other people's possessions.... By all means lock them away. Cannabis however should be brought under government control, there is no doubt about it. Psychologist
  • Score: 0

11:06am Wed 24 Aug 11

barrowboy says...

if you read the police statement this was an operation to catch burglars, because these scum are greedy the police also identified drug dealers and had to act. Burnley Wood is a far better place without these cannabis using, thieving, scumbags.
if you read the police statement this was an operation to catch burglars, because these scum are greedy the police also identified drug dealers and had to act. Burnley Wood is a far better place without these cannabis using, thieving, scumbags. barrowboy
  • Score: 0

11:38am Wed 24 Aug 11

Psychologist says...

Careful barrowboy, your prejudice is showing.
It certainly will be a better place without any thieves but wether or not they used cannabis is inconsequential.
Cannabis is not a bad thing, it shouldn't be portrayed as such. Just because it's currently illegal for no good reason it gets a bad rep. It is no more a bad thing than your morning cup of coffee, I certainly wouldn't be prejudiced against you because you're a caffeine user, you should apply the same courtesy to others.
Careful barrowboy, your prejudice is showing. It certainly will be a better place without any thieves but wether or not they used cannabis is inconsequential. Cannabis is not a bad thing, it shouldn't be portrayed as such. Just because it's currently illegal for no good reason it gets a bad rep. It is no more a bad thing than your morning cup of coffee, I certainly wouldn't be prejudiced against you because you're a caffeine user, you should apply the same courtesy to others. Psychologist
  • Score: 0

12:11pm Wed 24 Aug 11

Peter-Reynolds says...

You are such a gentleman Psychologist. I'm not sure barrow boys understand reason and common sense.
You are such a gentleman Psychologist. I'm not sure barrow boys understand reason and common sense. Peter-Reynolds
  • Score: 0

12:31pm Wed 24 Aug 11

jamie g says...

they brought it all them selfs they shudnt of gone round incurageing people to steal things n sell it to them its pafectic if u ask me this guy asked me if i wanted to buy sum trainers off him n i bought em cause they was okay dosnt mean were crimanals police going round smoking cannabis we youths it not right at alll !!!!¬
they brought it all them selfs they shudnt of gone round incurageing people to steal things n sell it to them its pafectic if u ask me this guy asked me if i wanted to buy sum trainers off him n i bought em cause they was okay dosnt mean were crimanals police going round smoking cannabis we youths it not right at alll !!!!¬ jamie g
  • Score: 0

1:00pm Wed 24 Aug 11

Peter-Reynolds says...

I thought they spoke English in Lancashire. What language is that jamie g?
I thought they spoke English in Lancashire. What language is that jamie g? Peter-Reynolds
  • Score: 0

8:39pm Wed 24 Aug 11

Michael@ClitheroeSince58 says...

Peter-Reynolds wrote:
I thought they spoke English in Lancashire. What language is that jamie g?
It's very probably Burnley language Peter, You should join the Burnley Buy & Sell site on facebook it's a whole new language to experience :)
[quote][p][bold]Peter-Reynolds[/bold] wrote: I thought they spoke English in Lancashire. What language is that jamie g?[/p][/quote]It's very probably Burnley language Peter, You should join the Burnley Buy & Sell site on facebook it's a whole new language to experience :) Michael@ClitheroeSince58
  • Score: 0

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