Public sector strikes: How East Lancashire services will be affected

Lancashire Telegraph: Public sector strikes: How East Lancashire services will be affected Public sector strikes: How East Lancashire services will be affected

People in East Lancashire are being warned to expect disruption to council and hospital services on Wednesday as a result of the Day of Action strike by public sector workers.

Staff at courts, Jobcentres and emergency services are expected to take part in the industrial action.

Blackburn Magistrates’, Burnley Magistrates’, Reedley Magistrates’, Hyndburn Magistrates’ and Burnley Crown could all be affected.

A spokesman for Her Majesty’s Courts and Tribunals Service said cases would be prioritised to ensure public safety.

He said: “We have robust contingency plans in place which will prioritise the delivery of our most essential services.

"These include custody cases and urgent family cases. Our aim is to keep disruption to a minimum.

"Our intention is to continue to work with all staff to deliver our services to the public.”

The Department for Work and Pensions said ‘business continuity measures’ were in place to deliver and maintain a service at the area’s Jobcentres.

In addition, everyone who is entitled to benefits will receive them.

Lancashire Police officers will be drafted in to answer 999 calls when civilian staff walk out.

The North West Ambulance Service said a safe service, albeit a reduced one, will be maintained during the day of action.

The number of vehicles on the road may also be reduced and will be sent to those most in need of treatment.

Services will be disrupted at East Lancashire’s hospitals when staff, including nurses, walk out.

Staff at Royal Blackburn and Burnley General Hospitals have notified NHS bosses of their intention to take strike action.

Mark Brearley, East Lancashire Hospitals NHS Trust chief executive, said: “Negotiations have taken place with the trade unions to ensure that appropriate staffing levels will be maintained to ensure emergency and urgent care continues to be provided. Doctors are not on strike.

“Some less-urgent procedures and outpatient appointments for that day will be postponed and we have endeavoured to contact any patients affected.

"We will make every effort to reschedule these appointments as soon as possible.

“We sincerely apologise for any inconvenience caused to our patients and their families.”

Blackburn with Darwen

Bosses at Blackburn with Darwen Council warned people to expect disruption to all of its services.

Blackburn with Darwen Council’s binmen will not pick up rubbish on strike day, with a double collection planned in stead for Wednesday, December 7.

But recycling collections will be carried out as normal.

The borough’s household waste and recycling centres will remain open.

Town halls in Blackburn and Darwen will be open, and the council’s contact centre will be operating on 01254 585585.

Markets will also be open, but libraries are expected to close, with limited access for bookings and access to the employment agency, and some telephone renewals available.

All leisure centres will be in operation apart from Waves and Darwen Leisure Centre.

In addition, community transport will be available as usual and Feilden Street car park will be open from 7am to 6pm.

Burnley

Burnley Borough Council states staff will be at work at a range of Council buildings and facilities with, for example, St Peter's Centre and the Market Hall remaining open as usual.

Town hall chiefs said the main switchboard will be closed, but people with emergencies will be directed to a senior manager if they call.

Hyndburn

In Hyndburn, all council offices will be closed, with the exception of the cemeteries office, which will provide a normal service.

All scheduled collections in Hyndburn are expected to be carried out.

Pendle

Pendle Council is aiming to keep markets in Nelson and Colne open, and luncheon clubs for elderly and disabled people will run as normal in Trawden, and in Railway Street, Nelson.

The Contact Pendle Centre, in Market Street, Nelson, which includes the borough’s main switchboard, will be closed.

Council bosses said bin and recycling collections will be ‘severely disrupted’ on strike day.

Residents whose household waste or recycling is due to be collected on Wednesday are likely to be affected.

If their domestic waste, which goes in their grey bins, is not picked up on Wednesday, it will be collected on Thursday or Friday instead.

But they will have to wait until Wednesday, December 14 for their recycling to be collected from their brown bins and green bins.

Collections of bulky household waste and clinical waste will not be affected because they are provided by outside contractors.

Ribble Valley

Ribble Valley Borough Council said it had no plans to suspend any services, although some might be affected, depending on the number of staff who walk out.

All scheduled collections in the Ribble Valley are expected to be carried out.

Rossendale

Rossendale’s offices will be open, but a Cabinet Meeting planned for Wednesday has been rearranged to take place in the Council Chamber, at 6.30pm on Thursday December 1.

Household waste collections will be prioritised, with garden waste collections suspended.

Where household waste is not collected, council staff will attempt to pick it up in the days following the strike.

Recycling will be collected on the next scheduled day.

Comments (17)

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7:01pm Mon 28 Nov 11

ghost of sceptic says...

So the refuse collecters of Blackburn & Darwen will lose a days pay and then face double the amount of waste the following week???
Think about this refuse collectors, the council want you to move the waste you have not been paid to move the following week and you will not be in recipt of any extra pay as you cannot make profit from a strike! Your on a no win you might aswell go to work.
So the refuse collecters of Blackburn & Darwen will lose a days pay and then face double the amount of waste the following week??? Think about this refuse collectors, the council want you to move the waste you have not been paid to move the following week and you will not be in recipt of any extra pay as you cannot make profit from a strike! Your on a no win you might aswell go to work. ghost of sceptic

7:49pm Mon 28 Nov 11

happycyclist says...

ghost of sceptic wrote:
So the refuse collecters of Blackburn & Darwen will lose a days pay and then face double the amount of waste the following week???
Think about this refuse collectors, the council want you to move the waste you have not been paid to move the following week and you will not be in recipt of any extra pay as you cannot make profit from a strike! Your on a no win you might aswell go to work.
That's the nature of all strikes. No little elves come in to do the work; it's still there when they go back after a strike.
It can balance itself out if money not paid to striking workers is then paid to them in overtime to clear up the backlog, so nobody loses out really. They get to make their point and cause a bit of disruption, and the bins will still be emptied.
[quote][p][bold]ghost of sceptic[/bold] wrote: So the refuse collecters of Blackburn & Darwen will lose a days pay and then face double the amount of waste the following week??? Think about this refuse collectors, the council want you to move the waste you have not been paid to move the following week and you will not be in recipt of any extra pay as you cannot make profit from a strike! Your on a no win you might aswell go to work.[/p][/quote]That's the nature of all strikes. No little elves come in to do the work; it's still there when they go back after a strike. It can balance itself out if money not paid to striking workers is then paid to them in overtime to clear up the backlog, so nobody loses out really. They get to make their point and cause a bit of disruption, and the bins will still be emptied. happycyclist

9:18pm Mon 28 Nov 11

Mr-Reasonable says...

Useless lazy bunch bin men are half of the time they leave bins unemptied when they do bother they leave half the rubbish in the street.
Sack the muppets
Useless lazy bunch bin men are half of the time they leave bins unemptied when they do bother they leave half the rubbish in the street. Sack the muppets Mr-Reasonable

9:18pm Mon 28 Nov 11

Mr-Reasonable says...

Useless lazy bunch bin men are half of the time they leave bins unemptied when they do bother they leave half the rubbish in the street.
Sack the muppets
Useless lazy bunch bin men are half of the time they leave bins unemptied when they do bother they leave half the rubbish in the street. Sack the muppets Mr-Reasonable

9:48pm Mon 28 Nov 11

Michael@ClitheroeSince58 says...

My bin day is Wednesday, if my Bin don't get emptied I'm going to be well upset as it's the only thing that I live for, It's the highlight of my working week lol
My bin day is Wednesday, if my Bin don't get emptied I'm going to be well upset as it's the only thing that I live for, It's the highlight of my working week lol Michael@ClitheroeSince58

10:08pm Mon 28 Nov 11

happycyclist says...

Michael@ClitheroeSin
ce58
wrote:
My bin day is Wednesday, if my Bin don't get emptied I'm going to be well upset as it's the only thing that I live for, It's the highlight of my working week lol
Ha ha!
[quote][p][bold]Michael@ClitheroeSin ce58[/bold] wrote: My bin day is Wednesday, if my Bin don't get emptied I'm going to be well upset as it's the only thing that I live for, It's the highlight of my working week lol[/p][/quote]Ha ha! happycyclist

10:35pm Mon 28 Nov 11

not too old to care says...

The Public sector are paid and partly pensioned by the private sector. Public sector pensions in comparison to their contributions are far superior to those in the private sector. Can anyone explain why private sector workers deserve less.
My Xmas tip to the bin men will stay in my pocket this year.
The Public sector are paid and partly pensioned by the private sector. Public sector pensions in comparison to their contributions are far superior to those in the private sector. Can anyone explain why private sector workers deserve less. My Xmas tip to the bin men will stay in my pocket this year. not too old to care

11:57pm Mon 28 Nov 11

123Jon123 says...

I blame Steve Kean
I blame Steve Kean 123Jon123

9:22am Tue 29 Nov 11

midas says...

not too old to care wrote:
The Public sector are paid and partly pensioned by the private sector. Public sector pensions in comparison to their contributions are far superior to those in the private sector. Can anyone explain why private sector workers deserve less. My Xmas tip to the bin men will stay in my pocket this year.
Private sector jobs are supported by the revenue that public sector employees pay for their goods/services. Why should the private sector benefit from public sector money?
.
Public sector employees pay tax and NI as well.
.
Private sector workers have the choice betwen working for a private sector company and all the benefits that incurs or working in the public sector.
.
Private sector workers get to negotiate their own pay and conditions - they have private healthcare and other perks and some have employer contribution to pensions as well.
.
Why do you support the "race to the bottom"?
[quote][p][bold]not too old to care[/bold] wrote: The Public sector are paid and partly pensioned by the private sector. Public sector pensions in comparison to their contributions are far superior to those in the private sector. Can anyone explain why private sector workers deserve less. My Xmas tip to the bin men will stay in my pocket this year.[/p][/quote]Private sector jobs are supported by the revenue that public sector employees pay for their goods/services. Why should the private sector benefit from public sector money? . Public sector employees pay tax and NI as well. . Private sector workers have the choice betwen working for a private sector company and all the benefits that incurs or working in the public sector. . Private sector workers get to negotiate their own pay and conditions - they have private healthcare and other perks and some have employer contribution to pensions as well. . Why do you support the "race to the bottom"? midas

11:15am Tue 29 Nov 11

BuckoTheMoose says...

The entire public sector wage bill is paid from taxes taken from the private sector. The fact that they pay a little bit back in taxes themselves is irrelevant.

Private sector workers do not get to negotiate pay and conditions. When you are accepted for a job you are told what the pay and conditions will be. The only choice you have is take the job or not.

We don't support 'race to the bottom', we are just sick of paying for the public sector to get a much better deal. Also to employ an army of jobsworths whose only role is to hector and nanny us.
The entire public sector wage bill is paid from taxes taken from the private sector. The fact that they pay a little bit back in taxes themselves is irrelevant. Private sector workers do not get to negotiate pay and conditions. When you are accepted for a job you are told what the pay and conditions will be. The only choice you have is take the job or not. We don't support 'race to the bottom', we are just sick of paying for the public sector to get a much better deal. Also to employ an army of jobsworths whose only role is to hector and nanny us. BuckoTheMoose

12:53pm Tue 29 Nov 11

bikerjohn_uk says...

@midas - explain how your argument works for me then? I work in the private sector. When I applied for the job I was told how much I would be paid; I was told how many days leave a year I will be entitled to; I was told that I am entitled to full pay during sick leave up to a maximum of 10 working days, and statutory there after. I receive no pension contributions (I have to organise that myself), and I have to rely on the NHS if I fall ill, just like you do. I receive a fixed wage, and the only recourse I have if I don't like the terms of my job is to leave and find another. All my taxes go towards paying people like doctors, nurses, teachers, police officers, soldiers, bin men, road sweepers and other persons employed by the governmnet, be it central or local. I think therefore that I am entirely justified in being just a teensy bit p!ssed off by being held to ransom by lazy, feckless people who have the luxury of an option of going on strike only to be welcomed back with open arms the next day to carry on as if nothing has happened. And all because you're going to have to work 12 months longer to get your golden handshake at the end of it. Well boo hoo, get a grip and welcome to the real world.
@midas - explain how your argument works for me then? I work in the private sector. When I applied for the job I was told how much I would be paid; I was told how many days leave a year I will be entitled to; I was told that I am entitled to full pay during sick leave up to a maximum of 10 working days, and statutory there after. I receive no pension contributions (I have to organise that myself), and I have to rely on the NHS if I fall ill, just like you do. I receive a fixed wage, and the only recourse I have if I don't like the terms of my job is to leave and find another. All my taxes go towards paying people like doctors, nurses, teachers, police officers, soldiers, bin men, road sweepers and other persons employed by the governmnet, be it central or local. I think therefore that I am entirely justified in being just a teensy bit p!ssed off by being held to ransom by lazy, feckless people who have the luxury of an option of going on strike only to be welcomed back with open arms the next day to carry on as if nothing has happened. And all because you're going to have to work 12 months longer to get your golden handshake at the end of it. Well boo hoo, get a grip and welcome to the real world. bikerjohn_uk

3:37pm Tue 29 Nov 11

jack daniels says...

BuckoTheMoose wrote:
The entire public sector wage bill is paid from taxes taken from the private sector. The fact that they pay a little bit back in taxes themselves is irrelevant. Private sector workers do not get to negotiate pay and conditions. When you are accepted for a job you are told what the pay and conditions will be. The only choice you have is take the job or not. We don't support 'race to the bottom', we are just sick of paying for the public sector to get a much better deal. Also to employ an army of jobsworths whose only role is to hector and nanny us.
“When you are accepted for a job you are told what the pay and conditions will be. The only choice you have is take the job or not.”

So, just because people have taken a public sector job, you feel that you can insult them and do nothing when their contract is changed?

Do you not feel that that shows more about your envy rather than the start of a moral crusade?
[quote][p][bold]BuckoTheMoose[/bold] wrote: The entire public sector wage bill is paid from taxes taken from the private sector. The fact that they pay a little bit back in taxes themselves is irrelevant. Private sector workers do not get to negotiate pay and conditions. When you are accepted for a job you are told what the pay and conditions will be. The only choice you have is take the job or not. We don't support 'race to the bottom', we are just sick of paying for the public sector to get a much better deal. Also to employ an army of jobsworths whose only role is to hector and nanny us.[/p][/quote]“When you are accepted for a job you are told what the pay and conditions will be. The only choice you have is take the job or not.” So, just because people have taken a public sector job, you feel that you can insult them and do nothing when their contract is changed? Do you not feel that that shows more about your envy rather than the start of a moral crusade? jack daniels

3:38pm Tue 29 Nov 11

Lifeinthemix says...

its a set up....

have the day orf
its a set up.... have the day orf Lifeinthemix

3:40pm Tue 29 Nov 11

jack daniels says...

not too old to care wrote:
The Public sector are paid and partly pensioned by the private sector. Public sector pensions in comparison to their contributions are far superior to those in the private sector. Can anyone explain why private sector workers deserve less. My Xmas tip to the bin men will stay in my pocket this year.
according to the BBC website today

"The median average salary-linked public sector pension that is currently being paid out to a pensioner, is worth £5,600 a year.

That compares with £5,860 in the private sector."

So, not exactly "far superior", like you say then.....
[quote][p][bold]not too old to care[/bold] wrote: The Public sector are paid and partly pensioned by the private sector. Public sector pensions in comparison to their contributions are far superior to those in the private sector. Can anyone explain why private sector workers deserve less. My Xmas tip to the bin men will stay in my pocket this year.[/p][/quote]according to the BBC website today "The median average salary-linked public sector pension that is currently being paid out to a pensioner, is worth £5,600 a year. That compares with £5,860 in the private sector." So, not exactly "far superior", like you say then..... jack daniels

3:59pm Tue 29 Nov 11

jack daniels says...

bikerjohn_uk wrote:
@midas - explain how your argument works for me then? I work in the private sector. When I applied for the job I was told how much I would be paid; I was told how many days leave a year I will be entitled to; I was told that I am entitled to full pay during sick leave up to a maximum of 10 working days, and statutory there after. I receive no pension contributions (I have to organise that myself), and I have to rely on the NHS if I fall ill, just like you do. I receive a fixed wage, and the only recourse I have if I don't like the terms of my job is to leave and find another. All my taxes go towards paying people like doctors, nurses, teachers, police officers, soldiers, bin men, road sweepers and other persons employed by the governmnet, be it central or local. I think therefore that I am entirely justified in being just a teensy bit p!ssed off by being held to ransom by lazy, feckless people who have the luxury of an option of going on strike only to be welcomed back with open arms the next day to carry on as if nothing has happened. And all because you're going to have to work 12 months longer to get your golden handshake at the end of it. Well boo hoo, get a grip and welcome to the real world.
Would this be same real world that gets soldiers shot, Police stabbed and nurses physically assaulted on a Saturday night?

Is this the same real world where social services rescues children raped by gangs or help the elderly that are abused by their families in their own homes?

How’s that for the real world?


The difference between the UK and a third world nation is because the government spends money on creating an efficient public sector that ensures that our country ticks along reasonably well for the most part.

You are entitled think that these staff are lazy, and that is your opinion, but like everybody else who whines about them on this website, you’ll eventually need the help of these people and I’m 99% sure that whoever it is will be adequately trained and will bend over backwards to help you.

I was going to say that you are all an bunch of ungrateful sh!ts, but that would be wrong. It just that your taxes have paid for a service you’ve just not needed yet.
[quote][p][bold]bikerjohn_uk[/bold] wrote: @midas - explain how your argument works for me then? I work in the private sector. When I applied for the job I was told how much I would be paid; I was told how many days leave a year I will be entitled to; I was told that I am entitled to full pay during sick leave up to a maximum of 10 working days, and statutory there after. I receive no pension contributions (I have to organise that myself), and I have to rely on the NHS if I fall ill, just like you do. I receive a fixed wage, and the only recourse I have if I don't like the terms of my job is to leave and find another. All my taxes go towards paying people like doctors, nurses, teachers, police officers, soldiers, bin men, road sweepers and other persons employed by the governmnet, be it central or local. I think therefore that I am entirely justified in being just a teensy bit p!ssed off by being held to ransom by lazy, feckless people who have the luxury of an option of going on strike only to be welcomed back with open arms the next day to carry on as if nothing has happened. And all because you're going to have to work 12 months longer to get your golden handshake at the end of it. Well boo hoo, get a grip and welcome to the real world.[/p][/quote]Would this be same real world that gets soldiers shot, Police stabbed and nurses physically assaulted on a Saturday night? Is this the same real world where social services rescues children raped by gangs or help the elderly that are abused by their families in their own homes? How’s that for the real world? The difference between the UK and a third world nation is because the government spends money on creating an efficient public sector that ensures that our country ticks along reasonably well for the most part. You are entitled think that these staff are lazy, and that is your opinion, but like everybody else who whines about them on this website, you’ll eventually need the help of these people and I’m 99% sure that whoever it is will be adequately trained and will bend over backwards to help you. I was going to say that you are all an bunch of ungrateful sh!ts, but that would be wrong. It just that your taxes have paid for a service you’ve just not needed yet. jack daniels

9:37pm Tue 29 Nov 11

ghost of sceptic says...

bikerjohn_uk wrote:
@midas - explain how your argument works for me then? I work in the private sector. When I applied for the job I was told how much I would be paid; I was told how many days leave a year I will be entitled to; I was told that I am entitled to full pay during sick leave up to a maximum of 10 working days, and statutory there after. I receive no pension contributions (I have to organise that myself), and I have to rely on the NHS if I fall ill, just like you do. I receive a fixed wage, and the only recourse I have if I don't like the terms of my job is to leave and find another. All my taxes go towards paying people like doctors, nurses, teachers, police officers, soldiers, bin men, road sweepers and other persons employed by the governmnet, be it central or local. I think therefore that I am entirely justified in being just a teensy bit p!ssed off by being held to ransom by lazy, feckless people who have the luxury of an option of going on strike only to be welcomed back with open arms the next day to carry on as if nothing has happened. And all because you're going to have to work 12 months longer to get your golden handshake at the end of it. Well boo hoo, get a grip and welcome to the real world.
so you think road sweepers dinner ladies and bin men are in line for golden handshakes when they retire! you are narrow minded and deluded and could not be further from the truth, that is fact.
[quote][p][bold]bikerjohn_uk[/bold] wrote: @midas - explain how your argument works for me then? I work in the private sector. When I applied for the job I was told how much I would be paid; I was told how many days leave a year I will be entitled to; I was told that I am entitled to full pay during sick leave up to a maximum of 10 working days, and statutory there after. I receive no pension contributions (I have to organise that myself), and I have to rely on the NHS if I fall ill, just like you do. I receive a fixed wage, and the only recourse I have if I don't like the terms of my job is to leave and find another. All my taxes go towards paying people like doctors, nurses, teachers, police officers, soldiers, bin men, road sweepers and other persons employed by the governmnet, be it central or local. I think therefore that I am entirely justified in being just a teensy bit p!ssed off by being held to ransom by lazy, feckless people who have the luxury of an option of going on strike only to be welcomed back with open arms the next day to carry on as if nothing has happened. And all because you're going to have to work 12 months longer to get your golden handshake at the end of it. Well boo hoo, get a grip and welcome to the real world.[/p][/quote]so you think road sweepers dinner ladies and bin men are in line for golden handshakes when they retire! you are narrow minded and deluded and could not be further from the truth, that is fact. ghost of sceptic

10:39am Wed 30 Nov 11

crazydaizy says...

It surprises me reading these comments how unsupportive people really can be. i think its a huge shame. i can only speak for myself but i know there are others that . it will ring true for. i am a parent and my childs school is closed. i spent 3 months on zero pay this year because i was made redundant. that also means the 13 years i put into my pension amounts to a tin of beans and a loaf of bread when i retire. clearly there is a complete lack of respect for the work the strikers do and therefor i say they should stand their ground because judging by many of the comments made it shouldnt be a problem you all being out of work as you are a bunch of lazy people whos jobs are appantly not needled .
It surprises me reading these comments how unsupportive people really can be. i think its a huge shame. i can only speak for myself but i know there are others that . it will ring true for. i am a parent and my childs school is closed. i spent 3 months on zero pay this year because i was made redundant. that also means the 13 years i put into my pension amounts to a tin of beans and a loaf of bread when i retire. clearly there is a complete lack of respect for the work the strikers do and therefor i say they should stand their ground because judging by many of the comments made it shouldnt be a problem you all being out of work as you are a bunch of lazy people whos jobs are appantly not needled . crazydaizy

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