BAE’s ‘invisible’ jet makes second successful test flight

BAE’s ‘invisible’ jet makes second successful test flight

The unmanned Teranis jet has successfully completed another flight test, says BAE

First published in News Lancashire Telegraph: Photograph of the Author by , Reporter

A ‘INVISIBLE’ unmanned fighter jet has carried out its second successful test flight, it has been announced.

Taranis, named after the Celtic god of thunder, has been worked on by BAE staff at it’s Lancashire bases in Samlesbury and Warton.

During the latest tests, it flew in a fully ‘stealthy’ configuration, making it virtually invisible to radar.

The team changed all antennas on the aircraft to signature control variants and the air data boom on the nose was removed for the tests.

It used a specially designed system that allowed the aircraft to generate a full set of flight data, without the use of an external probe or boom.

Billed by military chiefs as the most technologically advanced aircraft ever built in the UK, the project has cost more than £185 million so far and funded jointly by the Ministry of Defence and UK industry.

When operational, the plane will be able to launch precision strikes in hostile territory while remaining undetected.

Taranis was first unveiled in July 2010, but remained classified until earlier this year.

During the tests, the aircraft also used a new communications system to stay in touch with its mission commander without giving away its position to the enemy.

Nigel Whitehead, group managing director of BAE Systems, said: “The first flight of a Taranis last year was a significant milestone for UK aviation and this latest development underlines the UK’s lead in unmanned air systems.

“The engineering data gathered from the latest phase of trials will help us develop the stealth technologies on Taranis further.”

Philip Dunne MP, Minister for Defence Equipment, Support and Technology, said: “The success of these test flights is an important milestone for the Taranis project.

“We are gaining vital insights into the potential of unmanned aircraft, and this knowledge will shape future capabilities and help reduce the risks faced by military personnel on the frontline.”

Comments (7)

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5:55pm Thu 17 Jul 14

noddy57 says...

This is very clever technology but l guess the current crop of pilots will be thinking otherwise. Like we could be out of work sooner than we thought.
This is very clever technology but l guess the current crop of pilots will be thinking otherwise. Like we could be out of work sooner than we thought. noddy57
  • Score: 8

1:02am Fri 18 Jul 14

Lancslad01 says...

billions wasted on death yet again
billions wasted on death yet again Lancslad01
  • Score: 10

1:22am Fri 18 Jul 14

El Barto says...

I think i saw it, this invisible plane. it's kept in the same place they keep our pensions, pay rises and the police force
Where's the starting button on these invisible drones? that is my biggest question,
I think i saw it, this invisible plane. it's kept in the same place they keep our pensions, pay rises and the police force Where's the starting button on these invisible drones? that is my biggest question, El Barto
  • Score: 6

10:57am Fri 18 Jul 14

rudis_dad says...

noddy57 wrote:
This is very clever technology but l guess the current crop of pilots will be thinking otherwise. Like we could be out of work sooner than we thought.
Better out of a job than dead - why put a human pilot in harm's way when the dirty work can be done remotely? That's the whole point of these things - it could be flying missions from over Afghanistan or Northern Iraq whilst the "pilot" monitors progress from a nice cushy office back in Blighty or a cabin on a ship well out of the way of the naughty people.
[quote][p][bold]noddy57[/bold] wrote: This is very clever technology but l guess the current crop of pilots will be thinking otherwise. Like we could be out of work sooner than we thought.[/p][/quote]Better out of a job than dead - why put a human pilot in harm's way when the dirty work can be done remotely? That's the whole point of these things - it could be flying missions from over Afghanistan or Northern Iraq whilst the "pilot" monitors progress from a nice cushy office back in Blighty or a cabin on a ship well out of the way of the naughty people. rudis_dad
  • Score: -9

1:24pm Fri 18 Jul 14

2 for 5p ridesagain says...

1984
1984 2 for 5p ridesagain
  • Score: -7

6:24pm Fri 18 Jul 14

ikap22 says...

rudis_dad wrote:
noddy57 wrote:
This is very clever technology but l guess the current crop of pilots will be thinking otherwise. Like we could be out of work sooner than we thought.
Better out of a job than dead - why put a human pilot in harm's way when the dirty work can be done remotely? That's the whole point of these things - it could be flying missions from over Afghanistan or Northern Iraq whilst the "pilot" monitors progress from a nice cushy office back in Blighty or a cabin on a ship well out of the way of the naughty people.
More like the naughty people who developed it will use it on the innocent children and women. 185 mill waste of money.
[quote][p][bold]rudis_dad[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]noddy57[/bold] wrote: This is very clever technology but l guess the current crop of pilots will be thinking otherwise. Like we could be out of work sooner than we thought.[/p][/quote]Better out of a job than dead - why put a human pilot in harm's way when the dirty work can be done remotely? That's the whole point of these things - it could be flying missions from over Afghanistan or Northern Iraq whilst the "pilot" monitors progress from a nice cushy office back in Blighty or a cabin on a ship well out of the way of the naughty people.[/p][/quote]More like the naughty people who developed it will use it on the innocent children and women. 185 mill waste of money. ikap22
  • Score: 8

10:56pm Fri 18 Jul 14

HelmshoreMan2010 says...

While trying to find a more effective mustarf gas and trying to find a way to treat the germans mustard gas during WW2 scientists stumbled upon an early form of chemotherapy and have arguably saved more lives now than lost in the war.

Hate it or love it war pushes most of the technological advantages in this world.

I'm not saying I agree or disagree with this aircraft or war in general but if we don't advance the enemy will and I am sure as hell I don't want that!
While trying to find a more effective mustarf gas and trying to find a way to treat the germans mustard gas during WW2 scientists stumbled upon an early form of chemotherapy and have arguably saved more lives now than lost in the war. Hate it or love it war pushes most of the technological advantages in this world. I'm not saying I agree or disagree with this aircraft or war in general but if we don't advance the enemy will and I am sure as hell I don't want that! HelmshoreMan2010
  • Score: 0

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