Council tax frozen by Lancashire County Council

A TAX freeze for 2013-14 has been agreed by Lancashire county councillors for their portion of the council tax.

But county treasurer Gill Fitzpatrick has warned that the authority is facing tough times ahead as it must find cuts of £250million by 2017.

The decision, passed by the council’s cabinet yesterday, will be debated by the full council on February 21.

It will mean the county’s portion of the council tax bill, for a band D property, will be £1,108 per year.

Cutbacks on £89million have already been agreed for this coming year, affecting Burnley, Hyndburn, Rossendale, Pendle and Ribble Valley. Some of the largest chunks are coming from social care fee reductions, reducing non-residential social care services, remodelling the learning disability and children and young people’s care services and trimming the special education needs transport bill.

The county council provides major services such as schools, highways, social services and waste management and accounts for 70 per cent of council tax bills.

An extra investment of £2.9million was also agreed by county councillors in ‘extra care’ supported housing schemes in Lancashire.

Lancashire Youth Council has also again been consulted on the budget and representatives have given their views to the cabinet.

Loren Coles, Chorley’s Youth Parliament member, said: “The highest priority is job opportunities for young people.”

But the provisions for parks and open spaces was least favoured by the youth council – with delegates calling for volunteers to take responsibility for beauty spots.

Comments (6)

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12:33pm Fri 8 Feb 13

kate11 says...

The reason they can leave it the same is because from April they are charging for unoccupied properties! Even if the property is uninhabitable following purchase due to structural repairs and the purchaser is living elsewhere for the moment and paying council tax elsewhere the council are charging them twice now until they move in!! How on earth are young people able to stop renting ,or living with parents when they are struggling not only to find deposits and pay a mortgage, pay rent ,do structural repairs and along come the council and charge them twice for the council tax!!
The reason they can leave it the same is because from April they are charging for unoccupied properties! Even if the property is uninhabitable following purchase due to structural repairs and the purchaser is living elsewhere for the moment and paying council tax elsewhere the council are charging them twice now until they move in!! How on earth are young people able to stop renting ,or living with parents when they are struggling not only to find deposits and pay a mortgage, pay rent ,do structural repairs and along come the council and charge them twice for the council tax!! kate11

1:00pm Fri 8 Feb 13

mavrick says...

kate11 wrote:
The reason they can leave it the same is because from April they are charging for unoccupied properties! Even if the property is uninhabitable following purchase due to structural repairs and the purchaser is living elsewhere for the moment and paying council tax elsewhere the council are charging them twice now until they move in!! How on earth are young people able to stop renting ,or living with parents when they are struggling not only to find deposits and pay a mortgage, pay rent ,do structural repairs and along come the council and charge them twice for the council tax!!
Simply because they don't care. The Tories are so blatantly looking after their banker friends in the city I am surprised that people have not taken to the streets.
I have full sympathy with young people struggling to get a deposit for their first house. The banks we bailed out with our money are deliberately demanding higher deposits due to their mismanagement and fiddling of their system. There needs to be a rebalancing of power in this country, The politicians are no longer afraid of the electorate.
[quote][p][bold]kate11[/bold] wrote: The reason they can leave it the same is because from April they are charging for unoccupied properties! Even if the property is uninhabitable following purchase due to structural repairs and the purchaser is living elsewhere for the moment and paying council tax elsewhere the council are charging them twice now until they move in!! How on earth are young people able to stop renting ,or living with parents when they are struggling not only to find deposits and pay a mortgage, pay rent ,do structural repairs and along come the council and charge them twice for the council tax!![/p][/quote]Simply because they don't care. The Tories are so blatantly looking after their banker friends in the city I am surprised that people have not taken to the streets. I have full sympathy with young people struggling to get a deposit for their first house. The banks we bailed out with our money are deliberately demanding higher deposits due to their mismanagement and fiddling of their system. There needs to be a rebalancing of power in this country, The politicians are no longer afraid of the electorate. mavrick

7:40pm Fri 8 Feb 13

rilistic says...

You have a short memory Mavrick. The banking crisis made a bad situation worse but that bad situation was caused by Brown and his advisers, Balls and Milliband, who spent way beyond what the country could afford. But then isn't that what every single Labour Government has ever done? Tory controlled LCC shows what can be done - frozen council tax and better services. Well done.
You have a short memory Mavrick. The banking crisis made a bad situation worse but that bad situation was caused by Brown and his advisers, Balls and Milliband, who spent way beyond what the country could afford. But then isn't that what every single Labour Government has ever done? Tory controlled LCC shows what can be done - frozen council tax and better services. Well done. rilistic

9:04pm Fri 8 Feb 13

Kevin, Colne says...

kate11 wrote:
The reason they can leave it the same is because from April they are charging for unoccupied properties! Even if the property is uninhabitable following purchase due to structural repairs and the purchaser is living elsewhere for the moment and paying council tax elsewhere the council are charging them twice now until they move in!! How on earth are young people able to stop renting ,or living with parents when they are struggling not only to find deposits and pay a mortgage, pay rent ,do structural repairs and along come the council and charge them twice for the council tax!!
kate11

Young people have always found saving a deposit a difficult task, but your point is well made as the difficulty is now greater by a considerable margin. We have experienced a credit boom of gargantuan proportions and a great deal of that was used to elevate the level of house prices way beyond historical norms in regard to price and income.

This was cheered to the rafters by politicians, the BBC and mainstream national media. It was insanity on a truly heroic scale; and the media never miss an opportunity to cheer the prospect of this situation returning sooner than later.

Today the elites are besotted with the idea of ‘affordable housing’. Perhaps a more accurate phrase would be ‘debt slavery’ because while the current policy of ZIRP is producing low interest rates for borrowers the inflation side of the equation is looking decidedly unpleasant. Price inflation in daily essentials is romping away, while for many wages are stagnating or falling in real terms. In other words the carrying of the debt burden is not being eroded through wage inflation, which is very different to the situation in past decades.

For example, the price of Brent crude is homing-in on $119 a barrel from a low of $107 in December, yet remarkably on this subject the mainstream media remain silent. Maybe this is a temporary spike, but if the price of Brent remains elevated for a prolonged period of time then one can foresee the squeeze on folks intensifying.

At the moment the freezing of local council tax is a ploy by the Coalition Government to engineer good news but I would not be surprised if political strategists were quietly looking at increasing taxation on property. Many multi-national corporations are foot-loose, adept at minimizing tax liability and wield immense power over governments. Similarly, increasing the level of taxation on ordinary individuals can lead to tax minimization strategies. From a taxation point of view property looks to me like a sitting duck.
[quote][p][bold]kate11[/bold] wrote: The reason they can leave it the same is because from April they are charging for unoccupied properties! Even if the property is uninhabitable following purchase due to structural repairs and the purchaser is living elsewhere for the moment and paying council tax elsewhere the council are charging them twice now until they move in!! How on earth are young people able to stop renting ,or living with parents when they are struggling not only to find deposits and pay a mortgage, pay rent ,do structural repairs and along come the council and charge them twice for the council tax!![/p][/quote]kate11 Young people have always found saving a deposit a difficult task, but your point is well made as the difficulty is now greater by a considerable margin. We have experienced a credit boom of gargantuan proportions and a great deal of that was used to elevate the level of house prices way beyond historical norms in regard to price and income. This was cheered to the rafters by politicians, the BBC and mainstream national media. It was insanity on a truly heroic scale; and the media never miss an opportunity to cheer the prospect of this situation returning sooner than later. Today the elites are besotted with the idea of ‘affordable housing’. Perhaps a more accurate phrase would be ‘debt slavery’ because while the current policy of ZIRP is producing low interest rates for borrowers the inflation side of the equation is looking decidedly unpleasant. Price inflation in daily essentials is romping away, while for many wages are stagnating or falling in real terms. In other words the carrying of the debt burden is not being eroded through wage inflation, which is very different to the situation in past decades. For example, the price of Brent crude is homing-in on $119 a barrel from a low of $107 in December, yet remarkably on this subject the mainstream media remain silent. Maybe this is a temporary spike, but if the price of Brent remains elevated for a prolonged period of time then one can foresee the squeeze on folks intensifying. At the moment the freezing of local council tax is a ploy by the Coalition Government to engineer good news but I would not be surprised if political strategists were quietly looking at increasing taxation on property. Many multi-national corporations are foot-loose, adept at minimizing tax liability and wield immense power over governments. Similarly, increasing the level of taxation on ordinary individuals can lead to tax minimization strategies. From a taxation point of view property looks to me like a sitting duck. Kevin, Colne

1:01pm Sat 9 Feb 13

Chris P Bacon says...

mavrick wrote:
kate11 wrote:
The reason they can leave it the same is because from April they are charging for unoccupied properties! Even if the property is uninhabitable following purchase due to structural repairs and the purchaser is living elsewhere for the moment and paying council tax elsewhere the council are charging them twice now until they move in!! How on earth are young people able to stop renting ,or living with parents when they are struggling not only to find deposits and pay a mortgage, pay rent ,do structural repairs and along come the council and charge them twice for the council tax!!
Simply because they don't care. The Tories are so blatantly looking after their banker friends in the city I am surprised that people have not taken to the streets.
I have full sympathy with young people struggling to get a deposit for their first house. The banks we bailed out with our money are deliberately demanding higher deposits due to their mismanagement and fiddling of their system. There needs to be a rebalancing of power in this country, The politicians are no longer afraid of the electorate.
People won't 'take to the streets' because they'd rather attack and condemn other people exactly like them who live in their neighbouring towns and cities. The lederene swine encourage that hatred and stoke it up since if all the problems you have is with 'thems down the road' then they are saved the trouble of having to defend themselves and their thievery that keeps us all oppressed.
[quote][p][bold]mavrick[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]kate11[/bold] wrote: The reason they can leave it the same is because from April they are charging for unoccupied properties! Even if the property is uninhabitable following purchase due to structural repairs and the purchaser is living elsewhere for the moment and paying council tax elsewhere the council are charging them twice now until they move in!! How on earth are young people able to stop renting ,or living with parents when they are struggling not only to find deposits and pay a mortgage, pay rent ,do structural repairs and along come the council and charge them twice for the council tax!![/p][/quote]Simply because they don't care. The Tories are so blatantly looking after their banker friends in the city I am surprised that people have not taken to the streets. I have full sympathy with young people struggling to get a deposit for their first house. The banks we bailed out with our money are deliberately demanding higher deposits due to their mismanagement and fiddling of their system. There needs to be a rebalancing of power in this country, The politicians are no longer afraid of the electorate.[/p][/quote]People won't 'take to the streets' because they'd rather attack and condemn other people exactly like them who live in their neighbouring towns and cities. The lederene swine encourage that hatred and stoke it up since if all the problems you have is with 'thems down the road' then they are saved the trouble of having to defend themselves and their thievery that keeps us all oppressed. Chris P Bacon

9:41am Sun 10 Feb 13

2 for 5p says...

kate11 wrote:
The reason they can leave it the same is because from April they are charging for unoccupied properties! Even if the property is uninhabitable following purchase due to structural repairs and the purchaser is living elsewhere for the moment and paying council tax elsewhere the council are charging them twice now until they move in!! How on earth are young people able to stop renting ,or living with parents when they are struggling not only to find deposits and pay a mortgage, pay rent ,do structural repairs and along come the council and charge them twice for the council tax!!
So what do you suggest Kate 11.
That everyone else pays more and subsidies these who are doing up a house, no thanks.
You don't have to buy your own house its not mandatory, if people want to buy your own place and do it up, PAY FOT IT YOURSELF.
[quote][p][bold]kate11[/bold] wrote: The reason they can leave it the same is because from April they are charging for unoccupied properties! Even if the property is uninhabitable following purchase due to structural repairs and the purchaser is living elsewhere for the moment and paying council tax elsewhere the council are charging them twice now until they move in!! How on earth are young people able to stop renting ,or living with parents when they are struggling not only to find deposits and pay a mortgage, pay rent ,do structural repairs and along come the council and charge them twice for the council tax!![/p][/quote]So what do you suggest Kate 11. That everyone else pays more and subsidies these who are doing up a house, no thanks. You don't have to buy your own house its not mandatory, if people want to buy your own place and do it up, PAY FOT IT YOURSELF. 2 for 5p

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