Lancashire TelegraphCall to action for East Lancashire's young 'twitchers' (From Lancashire Telegraph)

When news happens, text LT and your photos and videos to 80360. Or contact us by email or phone.

Call to action for East Lancashire's young 'twitchers'

THE RSPB is hoping to inspire the next generation of nature conservationists with its Big Schools’ Birdwatch.

The project, which will run from January 21 to February 1, is the UK’s biggest annual wildlife survey and helps wildlife experts to build up a picture of birds visiting school grounds.

Emma Reed, the RSPB’s edu-cation officer in Northern Eng-land, said: “A growing wealth of evidence suggests that many children have little or no contact with the natural world.

“This is bad news for wildlife because it means that future generations are less likely to care about the threats facing the environment.

“The Big Schools’ Birdwatch introduces children to their local wildlife and encourages them to care about the natural world.

“The survey is easy and fun so it can be the first step towards a lifelong love of wildlife.”

In 2012, the most common bird in Lancashire schools was the carrion crow, with an average of 4.9 of them spotted per school.

No birdwatching expertise is necessary for teachers, helpers or youngsters and the RSPB has produced a free schools’ pack containing everything teachers will need to get started. The Big Schools’ Birdwatch pack and the Little Schools’ Birdwatch pack, both produced by the RSPB contain all the resources and information to plan a birdwatch.

For further details and activity pack, visit rspb.org.uk/schoolswatch or call 0300 456 8340.

Comments (1)

Please log in to enable comment sorting

8:09pm Mon 7 Jan 13

Anthony A Cooper says...

A pity about the headline. The term 'twitcher' refers just to those birdwatchers who travel to see rare birds found by other people. Recording the common birds around schools is the very antithesis of this.
A pity about the headline. The term 'twitcher' refers just to those birdwatchers who travel to see rare birds found by other people. Recording the common birds around schools is the very antithesis of this. Anthony A Cooper
  • Score: 0

Comments are closed on this article.

click2find

About cookies

We want you to enjoy your visit to our website. That's why we use cookies to enhance your experience. By staying on our website you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more about the cookies we use.

I agree