Lancashire TelegraphAlarm as number of East Lancashire abandoned pets soars (From Lancashire Telegraph)

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Alarm as number of East Lancashire abandoned pets soars

Lancashire Telegraph: HOME NEEDED But too many animals are being aband-oned, like this neglected pup HOME NEEDED But too many animals are being aband-oned, like this neglected pup

ANIMAL shelters across East Lancashire are preparing themselves for the ‘aftermath of Christmas’ — but say there is no room at the inn.

RSPCA bosses say every year they see a large number of cats and dogs dumped and abandoned after the festive season when owners realise how much time and money they require.

Chief Inspector Cathy Hyde, who oversees the RSPCA shelters in Lancashire, said: “We are bracing ourselves for the aftermath.

“We normally see an influx at the end of January and into February when the puppies and kittens aren’t as cute and the owners realise that they take up lots of time and money to care for.

For many, they lose their novelty value.

“The figures have definitely increased throughout the year because of the recession. In previous years, it used to be animals like cats and dogs but now we are seeing an increase in the number of horses, rabbits and reptiles.

“We have more animals in our care than we have ever had in the past. Although we do everything we can to rehome animals that are fit and well, it’s not always possible. We are also getting more requests from pet owners to help treat their sick pets and pay for vet treatment. Because money is tight, pet insurance is normally one of the first things to go. All charities are affected by the recession.

"And now, when we are needed more than ever, our resources are being spread even more thinly.”

Steve Carpenter, deputy manager at the Altham RSPCA branch, said: “We tend to get young dogs that were puppies at Christmas brought into the shelter around March when they start chewing things.”

He said around 80 per cent of the dogs that need re-homing are ‘bull’ breeds —such as staffordshire bull terrier, bull mastiff and boxer crosses.

“Lots of people are giving them up, but not many are rehoming them. The cat population is out of control. We can’t keep up with the demand for new homes.”

He also said there had been a large increase in the number of stray rabbits needing new homes — rising from 17 in 2011 to 53 this year.

Comments (7)

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3:49pm Wed 2 Jan 13

2 for 5p says...

SOLUTION:
Bring back dog license, introduce a cat license then make owners and breeders get the animals chiped.
Anyone who then abandons a cat or dog, will then be traced.
Penalties would be ban on keeping pets again. Keep a pet whilst banned 2years prison.
SOLUTION: Bring back dog license, introduce a cat license then make owners and breeders get the animals chiped. Anyone who then abandons a cat or dog, will then be traced. Penalties would be ban on keeping pets again. Keep a pet whilst banned 2years prison. 2 for 5p
  • Score: 0

4:36pm Wed 2 Jan 13

Mothernature says...

2 for 5p wrote:
SOLUTION: Bring back dog license, introduce a cat license then make owners and breeders get the animals chiped. Anyone who then abandons a cat or dog, will then be traced. Penalties would be ban on keeping pets again. Keep a pet whilst banned 2years prison.
What of those that will be given up in the near future because people will not be allowed animals in smaller properties they are being forced to downsize too. Licences aren't going to help there and not every pet owner is a bad owner.
[quote][p][bold]2 for 5p[/bold] wrote: SOLUTION: Bring back dog license, introduce a cat license then make owners and breeders get the animals chiped. Anyone who then abandons a cat or dog, will then be traced. Penalties would be ban on keeping pets again. Keep a pet whilst banned 2years prison.[/p][/quote]What of those that will be given up in the near future because people will not be allowed animals in smaller properties they are being forced to downsize too. Licences aren't going to help there and not every pet owner is a bad owner. Mothernature
  • Score: 0

4:55pm Wed 2 Jan 13

midas says...

There is no hope of rehousing all the dogs that will be taken to the RSPCA and they will have to be put down. Same with SBT's - no chance of safely rehoming most of them - end of!
There is no hope of rehousing all the dogs that will be taken to the RSPCA and they will have to be put down. Same with SBT's - no chance of safely rehoming most of them - end of! midas
  • Score: 0

5:16pm Wed 2 Jan 13

jellybiff says...

When they come in just gas them and then we rid the land of some of these pests.Introduce £100 a year licences simples.
When they come in just gas them and then we rid the land of some of these pests.Introduce £100 a year licences simples. jellybiff
  • Score: 0

9:42pm Wed 2 Jan 13

Darwen Malc says...

jellybiff wrote:
When they come in just gas them and then we rid the land of some of these pests.Introduce £100 a year licences simples.
It's the low-lifes that treat animals this way that need gassing! And when will people stop saying 'simples', it's so last year!
[quote][p][bold]jellybiff[/bold] wrote: When they come in just gas them and then we rid the land of some of these pests.Introduce £100 a year licences simples.[/p][/quote]It's the low-lifes that treat animals this way that need gassing! And when will people stop saying 'simples', it's so last year! Darwen Malc
  • Score: 0

10:22am Thu 3 Jan 13

useyourhead says...

Charity run shelters (and that must be nearly all of them) are going to close in good numbers in the next few years as folk are less able to help, this combined with a large rise in animals needing help must mean that we will have to start putting them down quite quickly if not claimed or adopted. Longer term I think there ought to be heavy penalties for unlicenced breeders and entire (un-neutered) animals can only be sold to other licenced breeders. All so called pets should be sterile. they are happier, healthier and less likely to be aggressive.
Charity run shelters (and that must be nearly all of them) are going to close in good numbers in the next few years as folk are less able to help, this combined with a large rise in animals needing help must mean that we will have to start putting them down quite quickly if not claimed or adopted. Longer term I think there ought to be heavy penalties for unlicenced breeders and entire (un-neutered) animals can only be sold to other licenced breeders. All so called pets should be sterile. they are happier, healthier and less likely to be aggressive. useyourhead
  • Score: 0

11:09pm Fri 4 Jan 13

RSPCA Supporter says...

midas wrote:
There is no hope of rehousing all the dogs that will be taken to the RSPCA and they will have to be put down. Same with SBT's - no chance of safely rehoming most of them - end of!
You are totally wrong with your comment Midas, Altham does not and i repeat does not put animals to sleep, I work very closely with them and if they have a problem rehoming in the area they work with other RSPCA shelters to rehome them. The animal shelters may carry the RSPCA name but they get no money from the HQ, they have to raise all their own money to keep the shelters going.
[quote][p][bold]midas[/bold] wrote: There is no hope of rehousing all the dogs that will be taken to the RSPCA and they will have to be put down. Same with SBT's - no chance of safely rehoming most of them - end of![/p][/quote]You are totally wrong with your comment Midas, Altham does not and i repeat does not put animals to sleep, I work very closely with them and if they have a problem rehoming in the area they work with other RSPCA shelters to rehome them. The animal shelters may carry the RSPCA name but they get no money from the HQ, they have to raise all their own money to keep the shelters going. RSPCA Supporter
  • Score: 0

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