First 'free' primary school could open in Blackburn next year

First published in News

THE first ‘free’ primary school in East Lancashire could open in Blackburn next year for muslim boys and girls, it has been revealed.

Bosses at Tauheedul Islam Girls’ High School and Sixth Form College have applied to the Department for Education for a typical-sized primary school in Blackburn with Darwen.

In a letter to prospective parents the Blackburn school’s principal and chief executive Mufti Hamid Patel said there had been a ‘significant’ demand in the community for a ‘quality’ state funded muslim primary school.

The exact location of The Olive School in Blackburn has not been disclosed, however parents have been registering their interests ready for a September 2013 opening with a reception and year one class.

If successful, the move would leave Blackburn with Darwen Council in an ‘extremely difficult’ position for future planning for school places, a top official has claimed.

The council has been investing heavily in primary schools in the area to meet demands for places due to increasing birth rates in the borough.

If approved The Olive School would fall outside the education authority’s powers as free schools are all-ability state-funded schools set up in response to parental demand. They are in charge of their own admissions.

The school is being created under the Tauheedul Free Schools Trust which has already been given approval for a boys’ school which is set to open in September.

In the pre-application from the trust said: “Learners of The Olive School will find themselves part of an elite, but certainly not elitist, organisations.

“One where high powered learning, progress and achievement is coupled with a commitment to wider personal progression, including intellectual development of character and an intelligent moral and ethical compass.

“Tauheedul Schools have a common and consistent brand identity, reflecting a strong faith ethos, educational excellence and community service.”

A statement from the school said: “The proposal is currently being considered by the Department for Education, until an initial decision is reached, it would really be inappropriate to go into the detail of the application at this time, It is very early days.”

If the school goes ahead it would mean Tauheedul would be able to provide education for pupils from reception to sixth form.

Its boys school for 11 to 16 year-olds was given permission to open in September.

Mr Patel described the application as a ‘milestone’ for Blackburn and a ‘very important endeavour’.

Coun Maureen Bateson, executive member for children’s services at Blackburn with Darwen Council, said: “We have been made aware of a consultation within the Asian community.

“These types of applications are making it extremely difficult for the council to look at strategic planning for school places in Blackburn with Darwen.

“For example the council is just about to expand St Barnabas primary school.

“There is a pressure on school places but we are covering them at the moment.

“Given the growing birth rate the Government has given more money for that.”

Comments (238)

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says...

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6:46pm Fri 6 Apr 12

DGower says...

"Stragetic planning" from educations bosses?! Don't make me laugh Councillor Bateson. When you look at the debacle of BSF, the blind financial support of Queens Park / Blakewater / Blackburn Central, the loss of Darwen Moorland as an Academy from the fold, the loss of St Wilfrids as an Academy from the fold, redundancies, school closures, a new boys' school opening under your noses and now a proposal for a Primary school..............
... BwDBC have done many things Councillor Bateson but stratgeic planning is definitely not one of them.
"Stragetic planning" from educations bosses?! Don't make me laugh Councillor Bateson. When you look at the debacle of BSF, the blind financial support of Queens Park / Blakewater / Blackburn Central, the loss of Darwen Moorland as an Academy from the fold, the loss of St Wilfrids as an Academy from the fold, redundancies, school closures, a new boys' school opening under your noses and now a proposal for a Primary school.............. ... BwDBC have done many things Councillor Bateson but stratgeic planning is definitely not one of them. DGower
  • Score: 1

6:50pm Fri 6 Apr 12

Plasticbertrand says...

Just what Blackurn needs, a school to teach good muslims how not to participate or integrate with our society.
Just what Blackurn needs, a school to teach good muslims how not to participate or integrate with our society. Plasticbertrand
  • Score: 0

7:19pm Fri 6 Apr 12

VicLou says...

I wonder if they will be allowing 'non-muslims' in?!! Hmmm!!!
I wonder if they will be allowing 'non-muslims' in?!! Hmmm!!! VicLou
  • Score: 0

7:23pm Fri 6 Apr 12

wtloild says...

So kids can go all the way through to 18 never mixing outside their own group in any way shape or form. It can only end in tears.
So kids can go all the way through to 18 never mixing outside their own group in any way shape or form. It can only end in tears. wtloild
  • Score: -1

7:29pm Fri 6 Apr 12

wtloild says...

DGower wrote:
"Stragetic planning" from educations bosses?! Don't make me laugh Councillor Bateson. When you look at the debacle of BSF, the blind financial support of Queens Park / Blakewater / Blackburn Central, the loss of Darwen Moorland as an Academy from the fold, the loss of St Wilfrids as an Academy from the fold, redundancies, school closures, a new boys' school opening under your noses and now a proposal for a Primary school..............

... BwDBC have done many things Councillor Bateson but stratgeic planning is definitely not one of them.
The council is in a no-win situation. They've just about the highest birth-rate in the UK, the white population moving out in droves, and those remaining sending their kids to schools over the borders. It's a miracle things have stayed as stable for as long as they have.
[quote][p][bold]DGower[/bold] wrote: "Stragetic planning" from educations bosses?! Don't make me laugh Councillor Bateson. When you look at the debacle of BSF, the blind financial support of Queens Park / Blakewater / Blackburn Central, the loss of Darwen Moorland as an Academy from the fold, the loss of St Wilfrids as an Academy from the fold, redundancies, school closures, a new boys' school opening under your noses and now a proposal for a Primary school.............. ... BwDBC have done many things Councillor Bateson but stratgeic planning is definitely not one of them.[/p][/quote]The council is in a no-win situation. They've just about the highest birth-rate in the UK, the white population moving out in droves, and those remaining sending their kids to schools over the borders. It's a miracle things have stayed as stable for as long as they have. wtloild
  • Score: 1

7:40pm Fri 6 Apr 12

ghanto says...

there aready hundreds of mosques around and what have these people learned??

there are bayaans / foods etc every week in mosques
hear with one ear and take out of another and enjoy meals

infact things are worsening rather then improving

ive seen hundreds cars parked outside mosques

attending mosques like they would learn but once they had lunch everything vanishes
there aready hundreds of mosques around and what have these people learned?? there are bayaans / foods etc every week in mosques hear with one ear and take out of another and enjoy meals infact things are worsening rather then improving ive seen hundreds cars parked outside mosques attending mosques like they would learn but once they had lunch everything vanishes ghanto
  • Score: 0

7:42pm Fri 6 Apr 12

Cha'mone MF says...

Its for reasons such as this that the EDL and BNP have so much support in east Lancashire towns.

Further Evidence that the Asian community simply aren't interested in integration whatsoever.
Its for reasons such as this that the EDL and BNP have so much support in east Lancashire towns. Further Evidence that the Asian community simply aren't interested in integration whatsoever. Cha'mone MF
  • Score: 1

7:42pm Fri 6 Apr 12

living the end times in BB1 says...

This just show's how out of touch the government is regarding integration.
This just show's how out of touch the government is regarding integration. living the end times in BB1
  • Score: 1

7:49pm Fri 6 Apr 12

Excluded again says...

This has nothing to do with the Council. The whole point of the new government's 'free schools' programme was to remove Council 'interference' (or planning, if you like) of how many and where local schools should be.

The Council can no more stop this school being opened than it can stop the sun rising tomorrow morning.

Before the last election, people were warned that the Tory 'free schools' policy would result in various groups setting up schools to prevent integration. And this is exactly what has happened.
This has nothing to do with the Council. The whole point of the new government's 'free schools' programme was to remove Council 'interference' (or planning, if you like) of how many and where local schools should be. The Council can no more stop this school being opened than it can stop the sun rising tomorrow morning. Before the last election, people were warned that the Tory 'free schools' policy would result in various groups setting up schools to prevent integration. And this is exactly what has happened. Excluded again
  • Score: 0

7:56pm Fri 6 Apr 12

living the end times in BB1 says...

wtloild wrote:
So kids can go all the way through to 18 never mixing outside their own group in any way shape or form. It can only end in tears.
"it will be river's of blood my friend river's of blood.
[quote][p][bold]wtloild[/bold] wrote: So kids can go all the way through to 18 never mixing outside their own group in any way shape or form. It can only end in tears.[/p][/quote]"it will be river's of blood my friend river's of blood. living the end times in BB1
  • Score: 1

8:12pm Fri 6 Apr 12

hairy mary says...

yippee doo i cant wait, wow
yippee doo i cant wait, wow hairy mary
  • Score: 0

8:24pm Fri 6 Apr 12

ghanto says...

Some comments here are from people who wants publicity from this free mosque

Mosques and school are there to learn and NOT "hear and go" like free foods speach

People goes to mosques like showing very religious but dont learn anything

As soon as they come out they start bnackbiting outside the mosques itself

True and genuine old islam does no longer exists and modern islam
and new rules are made.

Whatever people likes is made islamic and what they dont like is not classed as none-islamic

admit it
Some comments here are from people who wants publicity from this free mosque Mosques and school are there to learn and NOT "hear and go" like free foods speach People goes to mosques like showing very religious but dont learn anything As soon as they come out they start bnackbiting outside the mosques itself True and genuine old islam does no longer exists and modern islam and new rules are made. Whatever people likes is made islamic and what they dont like is not classed as none-islamic admit it ghanto
  • Score: 0

8:34pm Fri 6 Apr 12

DGower says...

Has any non-muslim actually attempted to enrol their child into the muslim faith school? That would be the true litmus test. I would bet they haven't.
Has any non-muslim actually attempted to enrol their child into the muslim faith school? That would be the true litmus test. I would bet they haven't. DGower
  • Score: 0

9:31pm Fri 6 Apr 12

jack daniels says...

Another school, backed by a mosque which is funded by a foreign country that follows an extremist form of Islam. At what point are our politicians going to admit we have a serious problem.
Another school, backed by a mosque which is funded by a foreign country that follows an extremist form of Islam. At what point are our politicians going to admit we have a serious problem. jack daniels
  • Score: 1

9:46pm Fri 6 Apr 12

ghanto says...

BIRTH RATE????

What a awful comment

Children hardly goes to that sort of school until 11 so whats birth rate have to do with it
BIRTH RATE???? What a awful comment Children hardly goes to that sort of school until 11 so whats birth rate have to do with it ghanto
  • Score: 0

10:06pm Fri 6 Apr 12

bmurtaja says...

This is excellent news for Blackburn. The whole idea of the Free Schools policy is to enable excellent educational providers like Tauheedul to establish schools in places like Blackburn where councillors like Maureen Bateson have failed the local people. You just have to see the state of some of the primary school such as St Stephens and St Silas and the Ofsted inspections and the results speak for themselves.

So I hope Tauheedul establish more schools in Blackburn and just as the council was forced to give Blakewater College to Tauheedul, I hope Tauheedul takes more responsibility for schools in Blackburn as the council has failed, and failed for too long.

Well done Tauheedul and I am confident your application will be approved by the Department for Education.
This is excellent news for Blackburn. The whole idea of the Free Schools policy is to enable excellent educational providers like Tauheedul to establish schools in places like Blackburn where councillors like Maureen Bateson have failed the local people. You just have to see the state of some of the primary school such as St Stephens and St Silas and the Ofsted inspections and the results speak for themselves. So I hope Tauheedul establish more schools in Blackburn and just as the council was forced to give Blakewater College to Tauheedul, I hope Tauheedul takes more responsibility for schools in Blackburn as the council has failed, and failed for too long. Well done Tauheedul and I am confident your application will be approved by the Department for Education. bmurtaja
  • Score: 0

10:09pm Fri 6 Apr 12

bmurtaja says...

VicLou wrote:
I wonder if they will be allowing 'non-muslims' in?!! Hmmm!!!
Under the Free Schools policy, 50% of the places have to be allocated to people of all faiths and no faith.
[quote][p][bold]VicLou[/bold] wrote: I wonder if they will be allowing 'non-muslims' in?!! Hmmm!!![/p][/quote]Under the Free Schools policy, 50% of the places have to be allocated to people of all faiths and no faith. bmurtaja
  • Score: 0

10:10pm Fri 6 Apr 12

katypri says...

well it beggers belief as intergration is all we get thrown at us then they isolate themself will they be taught the 3 Rs or is that not going to be there first priority
well it beggers belief as intergration is all we get thrown at us then they isolate themself will they be taught the 3 Rs or is that not going to be there first priority katypri
  • Score: 1

10:14pm Fri 6 Apr 12

editor1988 says...

bmurtaja wrote:
This is excellent news for Blackburn. The whole idea of the Free Schools policy is to enable excellent educational providers like Tauheedul to establish schools in places like Blackburn where councillors like Maureen Bateson have failed the local people. You just have to see the state of some of the primary school such as St Stephens and St Silas and the Ofsted inspections and the results speak for themselves. So I hope Tauheedul establish more schools in Blackburn and just as the council was forced to give Blakewater College to Tauheedul, I hope Tauheedul takes more responsibility for schools in Blackburn as the council has failed, and failed for too long. Well done Tauheedul and I am confident your application will be approved by the Department for Education.
Could not agree with you more. This is excellent news for Blackburn and I hope Tauheedul open another few schools in the town to give every child in Blackburn the best education. For too long, schools in Blackburn have failed our children and some of the comments on the LET website reflect this. This school will begin the process of change and improve literacy and numeracy in Blackburn.

Best of wishes Tauheedul.
[quote][p][bold]bmurtaja[/bold] wrote: This is excellent news for Blackburn. The whole idea of the Free Schools policy is to enable excellent educational providers like Tauheedul to establish schools in places like Blackburn where councillors like Maureen Bateson have failed the local people. You just have to see the state of some of the primary school such as St Stephens and St Silas and the Ofsted inspections and the results speak for themselves. So I hope Tauheedul establish more schools in Blackburn and just as the council was forced to give Blakewater College to Tauheedul, I hope Tauheedul takes more responsibility for schools in Blackburn as the council has failed, and failed for too long. Well done Tauheedul and I am confident your application will be approved by the Department for Education.[/p][/quote]Could not agree with you more. This is excellent news for Blackburn and I hope Tauheedul open another few schools in the town to give every child in Blackburn the best education. For too long, schools in Blackburn have failed our children and some of the comments on the LET website reflect this. This school will begin the process of change and improve literacy and numeracy in Blackburn. Best of wishes Tauheedul. editor1988
  • Score: 0

10:16pm Fri 6 Apr 12

bmurtaja says...

DGower wrote:
Has any non-muslim actually attempted to enrol their child into the muslim faith school? That would be the true litmus test. I would bet they haven't.
I know quite a few who have and have really enjoyed their time. There are so many Church of England and Catholic schools across the country where Muslim pupils attend. So why can there not be Muslim schools with non-Muslim children.
[quote][p][bold]DGower[/bold] wrote: Has any non-muslim actually attempted to enrol their child into the muslim faith school? That would be the true litmus test. I would bet they haven't.[/p][/quote]I know quite a few who have and have really enjoyed their time. There are so many Church of England and Catholic schools across the country where Muslim pupils attend. So why can there not be Muslim schools with non-Muslim children. bmurtaja
  • Score: 0

10:25pm Fri 6 Apr 12

editor1988 says...

DGower wrote:
"Stragetic planning" from educations bosses?! Don't make me laugh Councillor Bateson. When you look at the debacle of BSF, the blind financial support of Queens Park / Blakewater / Blackburn Central, the loss of Darwen Moorland as an Academy from the fold, the loss of St Wilfrids as an Academy from the fold, redundancies, school closures, a new boys' school opening under your noses and now a proposal for a Primary school.............. ... BwDBC have done many things Councillor Bateson but stratgeic planning is definitely not one of them.
You have just to look at the results of the schools of Blackburn to reach the conclusion that the council and Cllr Bateson has failed us all.

Blackburn Council should be proud that it has Tauheedul in its midst. The government was going to close down Blakewater and Tauheedul intervened and improved the school. Tauheedul deserves huge credit.
[quote][p][bold]DGower[/bold] wrote: "Stragetic planning" from educations bosses?! Don't make me laugh Councillor Bateson. When you look at the debacle of BSF, the blind financial support of Queens Park / Blakewater / Blackburn Central, the loss of Darwen Moorland as an Academy from the fold, the loss of St Wilfrids as an Academy from the fold, redundancies, school closures, a new boys' school opening under your noses and now a proposal for a Primary school.............. ... BwDBC have done many things Councillor Bateson but stratgeic planning is definitely not one of them.[/p][/quote]You have just to look at the results of the schools of Blackburn to reach the conclusion that the council and Cllr Bateson has failed us all. Blackburn Council should be proud that it has Tauheedul in its midst. The government was going to close down Blakewater and Tauheedul intervened and improved the school. Tauheedul deserves huge credit. editor1988
  • Score: 0

10:36pm Fri 6 Apr 12

bmurtaja says...

Cha'mone MF wrote:
Its for reasons such as this that the EDL and BNP have so much support in east Lancashire towns.

Further Evidence that the Asian community simply aren't interested in integration whatsoever.
Such quotes affirm and necessitate the establishment of outstanding schools like Tauheedul so our children are equipped with adequate education and have opportunity in life and do not fall prey to the EDL and BNP racism. The root problem is the schools in East Lancashire are amongst the worst in the country and this has an impact on deprivation, crime and employment opportunities. This is why we need schools like Tauheedul.

As regards integration, Tauheedul is one of the few schools in the country that have established an excellent track record in community cohesion and integration. Just look at the contribution of the school to local charitable causes such as the hospice and ask yourself a question: Is there are any other school in the town that contributes to community cohesion as much as Tauheedul?

It is clear that the vast majority of people of Blackburn support Tauheedul and this includes non Muslims. All you have to do is speak to the parents at Blakewater College. Never in the past two decades has Blakewater got 37% and Tauheedul achieved this.

So, Tauheedul deserves credit and we should all be grateful.
[quote][p][bold]Cha'mone MF[/bold] wrote: Its for reasons such as this that the EDL and BNP have so much support in east Lancashire towns. Further Evidence that the Asian community simply aren't interested in integration whatsoever.[/p][/quote]Such quotes affirm and necessitate the establishment of outstanding schools like Tauheedul so our children are equipped with adequate education and have opportunity in life and do not fall prey to the EDL and BNP racism. The root problem is the schools in East Lancashire are amongst the worst in the country and this has an impact on deprivation, crime and employment opportunities. This is why we need schools like Tauheedul. As regards integration, Tauheedul is one of the few schools in the country that have established an excellent track record in community cohesion and integration. Just look at the contribution of the school to local charitable causes such as the hospice and ask yourself a question: Is there are any other school in the town that contributes to community cohesion as much as Tauheedul? It is clear that the vast majority of people of Blackburn support Tauheedul and this includes non Muslims. All you have to do is speak to the parents at Blakewater College. Never in the past two decades has Blakewater got 37% and Tauheedul achieved this. So, Tauheedul deserves credit and we should all be grateful. bmurtaja
  • Score: 0

10:40pm Fri 6 Apr 12

editor1988 says...

http://www.independe
nt.co.uk/news/educat
ion/education-news/m
uslim-school-helps-o
ut-secular-neighbour
-2129777.html

Critics may disagree with faith schools but read this article and make up your own mind objectively from the comments of the Headteacher of Blakewater.
http://www.independe nt.co.uk/news/educat ion/education-news/m uslim-school-helps-o ut-secular-neighbour -2129777.html Critics may disagree with faith schools but read this article and make up your own mind objectively from the comments of the Headteacher of Blakewater. editor1988
  • Score: 0

10:49pm Fri 6 Apr 12

bmurtaja says...

Lord Shuttleworth is Lord-Lieutenant for the County of Lancashire. He is the patron of Tauheedul and so is Jack Straw. Is it then still fair to label Tauheedul with anti-integration labels?
Lord Shuttleworth is Lord-Lieutenant for the County of Lancashire. He is the patron of Tauheedul and so is Jack Straw. Is it then still fair to label Tauheedul with anti-integration labels? bmurtaja
  • Score: 0

11:05pm Fri 6 Apr 12

gutterpress says...

Well, come on Jake Berry, have you any comment to make on this? Multiculturalism? Integration? Or do you only have opinions on things that don't rock the boat? A Cameron puppet.
Well, come on Jake Berry, have you any comment to make on this? Multiculturalism? Integration? Or do you only have opinions on things that don't rock the boat? A Cameron puppet. gutterpress
  • Score: 0

11:06pm Fri 6 Apr 12

bmurtaja says...

"Tauheedul Islam Boys’ High School, Blackburn. The girls’ school run by the proposers has the best track record in the country in ensuring that pupils with low prior achievement at primary school achieve five or more good grades at GCSE." (Department for Education)
http://education.gov
.uk/inthenews/inthen
ews/a00203454/free-s
chool-groups-set-to-
apply-for-2013

If the Department for Education is providing this testimony, then Tauheedul must be doing something special.
"Tauheedul Islam Boys’ High School, Blackburn. The girls’ school run by the proposers has the best track record in the country in ensuring that pupils with low prior achievement at primary school achieve five or more good grades at GCSE." (Department for Education) http://education.gov .uk/inthenews/inthen ews/a00203454/free-s chool-groups-set-to- apply-for-2013 If the Department for Education is providing this testimony, then Tauheedul must be doing something special. bmurtaja
  • Score: 0

11:10pm Fri 6 Apr 12

editor1988 says...

bmurtaja wrote:
"Tauheedul Islam Boys’ High School, Blackburn. The girls’ school run by the proposers has the best track record in the country in ensuring that pupils with low prior achievement at primary school achieve five or more good grades at GCSE." (Department for Education) http://education.gov .uk/inthenews/inthen ews/a00203454/free-s chool-groups-set-to- apply-for-2013 If the Department for Education is providing this testimony, then Tauheedul must be doing something special.
Along with Tauheedul's credibility, this statistic also demonstrates the poor state of the primary schools in Blackburn - which in itself is evidence of the need for organisations like Tauheedul to establish new primary schools and take over the management of existing schools.

Along with the council, the Diocese needs to re-consider its position. Many Church schools like St Stephens and St Silas are failing and this is not good. Give some of your schools to Tauheedul to run.
[quote][p][bold]bmurtaja[/bold] wrote: "Tauheedul Islam Boys’ High School, Blackburn. The girls’ school run by the proposers has the best track record in the country in ensuring that pupils with low prior achievement at primary school achieve five or more good grades at GCSE." (Department for Education) http://education.gov .uk/inthenews/inthen ews/a00203454/free-s chool-groups-set-to- apply-for-2013 If the Department for Education is providing this testimony, then Tauheedul must be doing something special.[/p][/quote]Along with Tauheedul's credibility, this statistic also demonstrates the poor state of the primary schools in Blackburn - which in itself is evidence of the need for organisations like Tauheedul to establish new primary schools and take over the management of existing schools. Along with the council, the Diocese needs to re-consider its position. Many Church schools like St Stephens and St Silas are failing and this is not good. Give some of your schools to Tauheedul to run. editor1988
  • Score: 0

11:41pm Fri 6 Apr 12

blackburn4life says...

This is fantastic news. Tauheedul is one of the very few schools which have been rated outstanding by ofsted in Blackburn. They have been invited by the National College for School Leaders to deliver leadership programmes in the north-west. This goes a long way in showing how highly rated the leadership is at tauheedul. All they are doing is that they are applying their experience and expertise in a different setting. Blackburn primary schools are mediocre and lack quality (only one primary school has been rated outstanding by ofsted in Blackburn), so what is the harm in having a school run by people who have a proven track record. As for integration, it will be open to all faiths and backgrounds. Tauheedul has shown how it integrates with the community by supporting a failing school in Blackburn (Blakewater College). Also, there are many articles in the LET archives where it has reported Tauheeduls contribution to non-Muslim charities and organisation. I think it's about time people promoted what they love rather than bashing what they hate.
This is fantastic news. Tauheedul is one of the very few schools which have been rated outstanding by ofsted in Blackburn. They have been invited by the National College for School Leaders to deliver leadership programmes in the north-west. This goes a long way in showing how highly rated the leadership is at tauheedul. All they are doing is that they are applying their experience and expertise in a different setting. Blackburn primary schools are mediocre and lack quality (only one primary school has been rated outstanding by ofsted in Blackburn), so what is the harm in having a school run by people who have a proven track record. As for integration, it will be open to all faiths and backgrounds. Tauheedul has shown how it integrates with the community by supporting a failing school in Blackburn (Blakewater College). Also, there are many articles in the LET archives where it has reported Tauheeduls contribution to non-Muslim charities and organisation. I think it's about time people promoted what they love rather than bashing what they hate. blackburn4life
  • Score: 0

11:48pm Fri 6 Apr 12

bmurtaja says...

blackburn4life wrote:
This is fantastic news. Tauheedul is one of the very few schools which have been rated outstanding by ofsted in Blackburn. They have been invited by the National College for School Leaders to deliver leadership programmes in the north-west. This goes a long way in showing how highly rated the leadership is at tauheedul. All they are doing is that they are applying their experience and expertise in a different setting. Blackburn primary schools are mediocre and lack quality (only one primary school has been rated outstanding by ofsted in Blackburn), so what is the harm in having a school run by people who have a proven track record. As for integration, it will be open to all faiths and backgrounds. Tauheedul has shown how it integrates with the community by supporting a failing school in Blackburn (Blakewater College). Also, there are many articles in the LET archives where it has reported Tauheeduls contribution to non-Muslim charities and organisation. I think it's about time people promoted what they love rather than bashing what they hate.
Totally agree. Very pleased to hear about National College for School Leaders.
[quote][p][bold]blackburn4life[/bold] wrote: This is fantastic news. Tauheedul is one of the very few schools which have been rated outstanding by ofsted in Blackburn. They have been invited by the National College for School Leaders to deliver leadership programmes in the north-west. This goes a long way in showing how highly rated the leadership is at tauheedul. All they are doing is that they are applying their experience and expertise in a different setting. Blackburn primary schools are mediocre and lack quality (only one primary school has been rated outstanding by ofsted in Blackburn), so what is the harm in having a school run by people who have a proven track record. As for integration, it will be open to all faiths and backgrounds. Tauheedul has shown how it integrates with the community by supporting a failing school in Blackburn (Blakewater College). Also, there are many articles in the LET archives where it has reported Tauheeduls contribution to non-Muslim charities and organisation. I think it's about time people promoted what they love rather than bashing what they hate.[/p][/quote]Totally agree. Very pleased to hear about National College for School Leaders. bmurtaja
  • Score: 0

12:02am Sat 7 Apr 12

icekubes22 says...

Tauheedul is part of an elitist Wahabi community who have always enjoyed 'blind' support and loyalty of some politicians.
The hidden agenda is to prohibit and/or prevent any integration with anyone other than kith and kin. Not for "vast majority of blackburn" but benefits a large section of the Indian/Gujerati communities with loyalties to the region of Bharuch.
It would be interesting if the media were to publish details of qualifications, experience and salary scales of those responsibile for academic subjects?
Tauheedul is part of an elitist Wahabi community who have always enjoyed 'blind' support and loyalty of some politicians. The hidden agenda is to prohibit and/or prevent any integration with anyone other than kith and kin. Not for "vast majority of blackburn" but benefits a large section of the Indian/Gujerati communities with loyalties to the region of Bharuch. It would be interesting if the media were to publish details of qualifications, experience and salary scales of those responsibile for academic subjects? icekubes22
  • Score: 0

12:03am Sat 7 Apr 12

editor1988 says...

blackburn4life wrote:
This is fantastic news. Tauheedul is one of the very few schools which have been rated outstanding by ofsted in Blackburn. They have been invited by the National College for School Leaders to deliver leadership programmes in the north-west. This goes a long way in showing how highly rated the leadership is at tauheedul. All they are doing is that they are applying their experience and expertise in a different setting. Blackburn primary schools are mediocre and lack quality (only one primary school has been rated outstanding by ofsted in Blackburn), so what is the harm in having a school run by people who have a proven track record. As for integration, it will be open to all faiths and backgrounds. Tauheedul has shown how it integrates with the community by supporting a failing school in Blackburn (Blakewater College). Also, there are many articles in the LET archives where it has reported Tauheeduls contribution to non-Muslim charities and organisation. I think it's about time people promoted what they love rather than bashing what they hate.
Excellent comment.

I hope LET takes notice. The standards of journalism at LET are one of the worst. The article has so many mistakes and misleading statements:

1. The first line states "for muslim boys and girls", not withstanding the punctutation error, this is factually incorrect. The school will open to all faith groups. LET journalists should research the Free Schools policy and if they had checked the DfE website, they would have realised a minimum of 50% of places are allocated to members of all faiths and no faith.

2. Paragraph number 2 - 'typical size', what does this mean?

3. Paragrapah number 3 - 'In a letter to prospective parents' - What does this mean? The letter was sent to parents with children. Where does prospective come in. It should read: In a letter to parents of prospective pupils at the school ...
4. 'They are in charge of their own admissions.' This comment is misleading as Free Schools are obliged to adhere to the Admissions Code including the requirement to have an open admissions policy.
5. 'In the pre-application from the trust said:' - A spelling mistake.

With these errors, one starts to think Tauheedul definitely needs to open these schools so 'prospective' LET journalists are equipped with the basic skills of journalism and writing.
[quote][p][bold]blackburn4life[/bold] wrote: This is fantastic news. Tauheedul is one of the very few schools which have been rated outstanding by ofsted in Blackburn. They have been invited by the National College for School Leaders to deliver leadership programmes in the north-west. This goes a long way in showing how highly rated the leadership is at tauheedul. All they are doing is that they are applying their experience and expertise in a different setting. Blackburn primary schools are mediocre and lack quality (only one primary school has been rated outstanding by ofsted in Blackburn), so what is the harm in having a school run by people who have a proven track record. As for integration, it will be open to all faiths and backgrounds. Tauheedul has shown how it integrates with the community by supporting a failing school in Blackburn (Blakewater College). Also, there are many articles in the LET archives where it has reported Tauheeduls contribution to non-Muslim charities and organisation. I think it's about time people promoted what they love rather than bashing what they hate.[/p][/quote]Excellent comment. I hope LET takes notice. The standards of journalism at LET are one of the worst. The article has so many mistakes and misleading statements: 1. The first line states "for muslim boys and girls", not withstanding the punctutation error, this is factually incorrect. The school will open to all faith groups. LET journalists should research the Free Schools policy and if they had checked the DfE website, they would have realised a minimum of 50% of places are allocated to members of all faiths and no faith. 2. Paragraph number 2 - 'typical size', what does this mean? 3. Paragrapah number 3 - 'In a letter to prospective parents' - What does this mean? The letter was sent to parents with children. Where does prospective come in. It should read: In a letter to parents of prospective pupils at the school ... 4. 'They are in charge of their own admissions.' This comment is misleading as Free Schools are obliged to adhere to the Admissions Code including the requirement to have an open admissions policy. 5. 'In the pre-application from the trust said:' - A spelling mistake. With these errors, one starts to think Tauheedul definitely needs to open these schools so 'prospective' LET journalists are equipped with the basic skills of journalism and writing. editor1988
  • Score: 0

12:09am Sat 7 Apr 12

bmurtaja says...

icekubes22 wrote:
Tauheedul is part of an elitist Wahabi community who have always enjoyed 'blind' support and loyalty of some politicians.
The hidden agenda is to prohibit and/or prevent any integration with anyone other than kith and kin. Not for "vast majority of blackburn" but benefits a large section of the Indian/Gujerati communities with loyalties to the region of Bharuch.
It would be interesting if the media were to publish details of qualifications, experience and salary scales of those responsibile for academic subjects?
This is totally inaccurate. As a Pakistani, I know of many Pakistani girls (and boys at the boys school) who study at the school. After some research and digging, I found that over one third of the pupils are of Pakistani origin. It is therefore unfair to make such comments. As for the staff, there are many Muslim and non Muslim staff from all different backgrounds. A parent told me that the Vice Principal is of Pakistani origin and there is also a white Assistant Principal and also Head of Sixth Form.

Tauheedul is inclusive and the evidence, results and parental demand from across all communities reflects this.
[quote][p][bold]icekubes22[/bold] wrote: Tauheedul is part of an elitist Wahabi community who have always enjoyed 'blind' support and loyalty of some politicians. The hidden agenda is to prohibit and/or prevent any integration with anyone other than kith and kin. Not for "vast majority of blackburn" but benefits a large section of the Indian/Gujerati communities with loyalties to the region of Bharuch. It would be interesting if the media were to publish details of qualifications, experience and salary scales of those responsibile for academic subjects?[/p][/quote]This is totally inaccurate. As a Pakistani, I know of many Pakistani girls (and boys at the boys school) who study at the school. After some research and digging, I found that over one third of the pupils are of Pakistani origin. It is therefore unfair to make such comments. As for the staff, there are many Muslim and non Muslim staff from all different backgrounds. A parent told me that the Vice Principal is of Pakistani origin and there is also a white Assistant Principal and also Head of Sixth Form. Tauheedul is inclusive and the evidence, results and parental demand from across all communities reflects this. bmurtaja
  • Score: 0

12:14am Sat 7 Apr 12

carrman2 says...

These people will not allow non-muslims in the school, It is against everything they believe in, A sad Day for Blackburn, these people will never Integrate,
These people will not allow non-muslims in the school, It is against everything they believe in, A sad Day for Blackburn, these people will never Integrate, carrman2
  • Score: 1

12:19am Sat 7 Apr 12

editor1988 says...

bmurtaja wrote:
icekubes22 wrote: Tauheedul is part of an elitist Wahabi community who have always enjoyed 'blind' support and loyalty of some politicians. The hidden agenda is to prohibit and/or prevent any integration with anyone other than kith and kin. Not for "vast majority of blackburn" but benefits a large section of the Indian/Gujerati communities with loyalties to the region of Bharuch. It would be interesting if the media were to publish details of qualifications, experience and salary scales of those responsibile for academic subjects?
This is totally inaccurate. As a Pakistani, I know of many Pakistani girls (and boys at the boys school) who study at the school. After some research and digging, I found that over one third of the pupils are of Pakistani origin. It is therefore unfair to make such comments. As for the staff, there are many Muslim and non Muslim staff from all different backgrounds. A parent told me that the Vice Principal is of Pakistani origin and there is also a white Assistant Principal and also Head of Sixth Form. Tauheedul is inclusive and the evidence, results and parental demand from across all communities reflects this.
The schools has pupils and staff from all backgrounds and all schools of thought. All staff are highly qualified and the salary is on the national scale. Girls go on to completing their A levels at the sixth form and get the best results and gain admission at the top universities. Definitely does not sound like a Wahhabi outfit whatever that may mean.
[quote][p][bold]bmurtaja[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]icekubes22[/bold] wrote: Tauheedul is part of an elitist Wahabi community who have always enjoyed 'blind' support and loyalty of some politicians. The hidden agenda is to prohibit and/or prevent any integration with anyone other than kith and kin. Not for "vast majority of blackburn" but benefits a large section of the Indian/Gujerati communities with loyalties to the region of Bharuch. It would be interesting if the media were to publish details of qualifications, experience and salary scales of those responsibile for academic subjects?[/p][/quote]This is totally inaccurate. As a Pakistani, I know of many Pakistani girls (and boys at the boys school) who study at the school. After some research and digging, I found that over one third of the pupils are of Pakistani origin. It is therefore unfair to make such comments. As for the staff, there are many Muslim and non Muslim staff from all different backgrounds. A parent told me that the Vice Principal is of Pakistani origin and there is also a white Assistant Principal and also Head of Sixth Form. Tauheedul is inclusive and the evidence, results and parental demand from across all communities reflects this.[/p][/quote]The schools has pupils and staff from all backgrounds and all schools of thought. All staff are highly qualified and the salary is on the national scale. Girls go on to completing their A levels at the sixth form and get the best results and gain admission at the top universities. Definitely does not sound like a Wahhabi outfit whatever that may mean. editor1988
  • Score: 0

12:22am Sat 7 Apr 12

Sad Darwener says...

If "ghanto" was educated at this type of school, I certainly don't want my children educated there! I want mine to be literate.
If "ghanto" was educated at this type of school, I certainly don't want my children educated there! I want mine to be literate. Sad Darwener
  • Score: 0

12:23am Sat 7 Apr 12

bmurtaja says...

editor1988 wrote:
blackburn4life wrote:
This is fantastic news. Tauheedul is one of the very few schools which have been rated outstanding by ofsted in Blackburn. They have been invited by the National College for School Leaders to deliver leadership programmes in the north-west. This goes a long way in showing how highly rated the leadership is at tauheedul. All they are doing is that they are applying their experience and expertise in a different setting. Blackburn primary schools are mediocre and lack quality (only one primary school has been rated outstanding by ofsted in Blackburn), so what is the harm in having a school run by people who have a proven track record. As for integration, it will be open to all faiths and backgrounds. Tauheedul has shown how it integrates with the community by supporting a failing school in Blackburn (Blakewater College). Also, there are many articles in the LET archives where it has reported Tauheeduls contribution to non-Muslim charities and organisation. I think it's about time people promoted what they love rather than bashing what they hate.
Excellent comment.

I hope LET takes notice. The standards of journalism at LET are one of the worst. The article has so many mistakes and misleading statements:

1. The first line states "for muslim boys and girls", not withstanding the punctutation error, this is factually incorrect. The school will open to all faith groups. LET journalists should research the Free Schools policy and if they had checked the DfE website, they would have realised a minimum of 50% of places are allocated to members of all faiths and no faith.

2. Paragraph number 2 - 'typical size', what does this mean?

3. Paragrapah number 3 - 'In a letter to prospective parents' - What does this mean? The letter was sent to parents with children. Where does prospective come in. It should read: In a letter to parents of prospective pupils at the school ...
4. 'They are in charge of their own admissions.' This comment is misleading as Free Schools are obliged to adhere to the Admissions Code including the requirement to have an open admissions policy.
5. 'In the pre-application from the trust said:' - A spelling mistake.

With these errors, one starts to think Tauheedul definitely needs to open these schools so 'prospective' LET journalists are equipped with the basic skills of journalism and writing.
editor1988

I hope LET make the amendments.

To conclude for the night, I wish Tauheedul the best and hope the council agrees to work with Tauheedul to improve educational standards in the town.
[quote][p][bold]editor1988[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]blackburn4life[/bold] wrote: This is fantastic news. Tauheedul is one of the very few schools which have been rated outstanding by ofsted in Blackburn. They have been invited by the National College for School Leaders to deliver leadership programmes in the north-west. This goes a long way in showing how highly rated the leadership is at tauheedul. All they are doing is that they are applying their experience and expertise in a different setting. Blackburn primary schools are mediocre and lack quality (only one primary school has been rated outstanding by ofsted in Blackburn), so what is the harm in having a school run by people who have a proven track record. As for integration, it will be open to all faiths and backgrounds. Tauheedul has shown how it integrates with the community by supporting a failing school in Blackburn (Blakewater College). Also, there are many articles in the LET archives where it has reported Tauheeduls contribution to non-Muslim charities and organisation. I think it's about time people promoted what they love rather than bashing what they hate.[/p][/quote]Excellent comment. I hope LET takes notice. The standards of journalism at LET are one of the worst. The article has so many mistakes and misleading statements: 1. The first line states "for muslim boys and girls", not withstanding the punctutation error, this is factually incorrect. The school will open to all faith groups. LET journalists should research the Free Schools policy and if they had checked the DfE website, they would have realised a minimum of 50% of places are allocated to members of all faiths and no faith. 2. Paragraph number 2 - 'typical size', what does this mean? 3. Paragrapah number 3 - 'In a letter to prospective parents' - What does this mean? The letter was sent to parents with children. Where does prospective come in. It should read: In a letter to parents of prospective pupils at the school ... 4. 'They are in charge of their own admissions.' This comment is misleading as Free Schools are obliged to adhere to the Admissions Code including the requirement to have an open admissions policy. 5. 'In the pre-application from the trust said:' - A spelling mistake. With these errors, one starts to think Tauheedul definitely needs to open these schools so 'prospective' LET journalists are equipped with the basic skills of journalism and writing.[/p][/quote]editor1988 I hope LET make the amendments. To conclude for the night, I wish Tauheedul the best and hope the council agrees to work with Tauheedul to improve educational standards in the town. bmurtaja
  • Score: 0

12:28am Sat 7 Apr 12

editor1988 says...

Sad Darwener wrote:
If "ghanto" was educated at this type of school, I certainly don't want my children educated there! I want mine to be literate.
There is no outstanding secondary school in the whole town. Tauheedul is the only one so I am confident the Tauheedul primary school will be the best in the town and I certainly would want my child to go there. Not only will he be literate, he will be fully equipped for secondary school and for a life full of opportunity.
[quote][p][bold]Sad Darwener[/bold] wrote: If "ghanto" was educated at this type of school, I certainly don't want my children educated there! I want mine to be literate.[/p][/quote]There is no outstanding secondary school in the whole town. Tauheedul is the only one so I am confident the Tauheedul primary school will be the best in the town and I certainly would want my child to go there. Not only will he be literate, he will be fully equipped for secondary school and for a life full of opportunity. editor1988
  • Score: 0

12:29am Sat 7 Apr 12

icannotrace says...

There are a lot of recent posts on here written in the same style all patting each other on the back?

Can "one" of the authors tell me if religion will be taught at the school and if so which one?
There are a lot of recent posts on here written in the same style all patting each other on the back? Can "one" of the authors tell me if religion will be taught at the school and if so which one? icannotrace
  • Score: 0

12:31am Sat 7 Apr 12

editor1988 says...

carrman2 wrote:
These people will not allow non-muslims in the school, It is against everything they believe in, A sad Day for Blackburn, these people will never Integrate,
Carman2, please refer to the comments above. Free schools are under a legal obligation to allow pupils of all faiths and no faith admission to the school so do not understand the basis of your claim.
[quote][p][bold]carrman2[/bold] wrote: These people will not allow non-muslims in the school, It is against everything they believe in, A sad Day for Blackburn, these people will never Integrate,[/p][/quote]Carman2, please refer to the comments above. Free schools are under a legal obligation to allow pupils of all faiths and no faith admission to the school so do not understand the basis of your claim. editor1988
  • Score: 0

12:43am Sat 7 Apr 12

carrman2 says...

Free schools for who Editor?, Would a Christian child be welcome or a Jewish Teacher be Employed ? come on Editor 1988 Where in the world ar you From!!, It will work for one part of the community,
Free schools for who Editor?, Would a Christian child be welcome or a Jewish Teacher be Employed ? come on Editor 1988 Where in the world ar you From!!, It will work for one part of the community, carrman2
  • Score: 1

12:44am Sat 7 Apr 12

bnp_fan says...

i am no fan of faith schools

after reading comments, i accept that this muzlim organisation has done well

maybe this school is good idea if it improves education in blackburn

these lot are integrating so we should welcome this
i am no fan of faith schools after reading comments, i accept that this muzlim organisation has done well maybe this school is good idea if it improves education in blackburn these lot are integrating so we should welcome this bnp_fan
  • Score: 0

12:47am Sat 7 Apr 12

bnp_fan says...

blackburn4life wrote:
This is fantastic news. Tauheedul is one of the very few schools which have been rated outstanding by ofsted in Blackburn. They have been invited by the National College for School Leaders to deliver leadership programmes in the north-west. This goes a long way in showing how highly rated the leadership is at tauheedul. All they are doing is that they are applying their experience and expertise in a different setting. Blackburn primary schools are mediocre and lack quality (only one primary school has been rated outstanding by ofsted in Blackburn), so what is the harm in having a school run by people who have a proven track record. As for integration, it will be open to all faiths and backgrounds. Tauheedul has shown how it integrates with the community by supporting a failing school in Blackburn (Blakewater College). Also, there are many articles in the LET archives where it has reported Tauheeduls contribution to non-Muslim charities and organisation. I think it's about time people promoted what they love rather than bashing what they hate.
i still have reservations about faith schools ...

i am not sure i support them, but this Blakewater stuff is pretty good

for muzlim school to be supporting one of our schools is good

maybe this new primary school will help primary schools which are not very good
[quote][p][bold]blackburn4life[/bold] wrote: This is fantastic news. Tauheedul is one of the very few schools which have been rated outstanding by ofsted in Blackburn. They have been invited by the National College for School Leaders to deliver leadership programmes in the north-west. This goes a long way in showing how highly rated the leadership is at tauheedul. All they are doing is that they are applying their experience and expertise in a different setting. Blackburn primary schools are mediocre and lack quality (only one primary school has been rated outstanding by ofsted in Blackburn), so what is the harm in having a school run by people who have a proven track record. As for integration, it will be open to all faiths and backgrounds. Tauheedul has shown how it integrates with the community by supporting a failing school in Blackburn (Blakewater College). Also, there are many articles in the LET archives where it has reported Tauheeduls contribution to non-Muslim charities and organisation. I think it's about time people promoted what they love rather than bashing what they hate.[/p][/quote]i still have reservations about faith schools ... i am not sure i support them, but this Blakewater stuff is pretty good for muzlim school to be supporting one of our schools is good maybe this new primary school will help primary schools which are not very good bnp_fan
  • Score: 0

12:51am Sat 7 Apr 12

editor1988 says...

carrman2 wrote:
Free schools for who Editor?, Would a Christian child be welcome or a Jewish Teacher be Employed ? come on Editor 1988 Where in the world ar you From!!, It will work for one part of the community,
Yes, why not?

From what I am told and other comments have said, the school currently employs Christian, atheists, agnostics and those who wish not to declare their faith. The school works with Rabbis so wy would Jewish staff not be welcome ...

I repeat - Free schools are under a legal obligation to allow pupils of all faiths and no faith admission to the school.
[quote][p][bold]carrman2[/bold] wrote: Free schools for who Editor?, Would a Christian child be welcome or a Jewish Teacher be Employed ? come on Editor 1988 Where in the world ar you From!!, It will work for one part of the community,[/p][/quote]Yes, why not? From what I am told and other comments have said, the school currently employs Christian, atheists, agnostics and those who wish not to declare their faith. The school works with Rabbis so wy would Jewish staff not be welcome ... I repeat - Free schools are under a legal obligation to allow pupils of all faiths and no faith admission to the school. editor1988
  • Score: 0

12:55am Sat 7 Apr 12

editor1988 says...

bnp_fan wrote:
blackburn4life wrote: This is fantastic news. Tauheedul is one of the very few schools which have been rated outstanding by ofsted in Blackburn. They have been invited by the National College for School Leaders to deliver leadership programmes in the north-west. This goes a long way in showing how highly rated the leadership is at tauheedul. All they are doing is that they are applying their experience and expertise in a different setting. Blackburn primary schools are mediocre and lack quality (only one primary school has been rated outstanding by ofsted in Blackburn), so what is the harm in having a school run by people who have a proven track record. As for integration, it will be open to all faiths and backgrounds. Tauheedul has shown how it integrates with the community by supporting a failing school in Blackburn (Blakewater College). Also, there are many articles in the LET archives where it has reported Tauheeduls contribution to non-Muslim charities and organisation. I think it's about time people promoted what they love rather than bashing what they hate.
i still have reservations about faith schools ... i am not sure i support them, but this Blakewater stuff is pretty good for muzlim school to be supporting one of our schools is good maybe this new primary school will help primary schools which are not very good
If Tauheedul has supported Blakewater, I am pretty sure they will support other schools in Blackburn so if everyone was more positive about this like you, despite your reservations about faith schools, this would help.
[quote][p][bold]bnp_fan[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]blackburn4life[/bold] wrote: This is fantastic news. Tauheedul is one of the very few schools which have been rated outstanding by ofsted in Blackburn. They have been invited by the National College for School Leaders to deliver leadership programmes in the north-west. This goes a long way in showing how highly rated the leadership is at tauheedul. All they are doing is that they are applying their experience and expertise in a different setting. Blackburn primary schools are mediocre and lack quality (only one primary school has been rated outstanding by ofsted in Blackburn), so what is the harm in having a school run by people who have a proven track record. As for integration, it will be open to all faiths and backgrounds. Tauheedul has shown how it integrates with the community by supporting a failing school in Blackburn (Blakewater College). Also, there are many articles in the LET archives where it has reported Tauheeduls contribution to non-Muslim charities and organisation. I think it's about time people promoted what they love rather than bashing what they hate.[/p][/quote]i still have reservations about faith schools ... i am not sure i support them, but this Blakewater stuff is pretty good for muzlim school to be supporting one of our schools is good maybe this new primary school will help primary schools which are not very good[/p][/quote]If Tauheedul has supported Blakewater, I am pretty sure they will support other schools in Blackburn so if everyone was more positive about this like you, despite your reservations about faith schools, this would help. editor1988
  • Score: 0

12:56am Sat 7 Apr 12

DGower says...

Whilst I accept that a certain quota of places must be offered to those of a different faith or no faith, I still wonder whether those who bang the integration drum would send their children to Tauheedul Primary or Secondary schools despite their obvious talents in academic leadership and attainment. You can have as big a quota as you wish but if no Christian parent, Hindu parent, Jewish parent, Sikh paren or atheist parent wishes to send their child then this is hardly the fault of Tauheedul I suppose. They clearly know how to run schools, let them do what they are good at and prosper.
Whilst I accept that a certain quota of places must be offered to those of a different faith or no faith, I still wonder whether those who bang the integration drum would send their children to Tauheedul Primary or Secondary schools despite their obvious talents in academic leadership and attainment. You can have as big a quota as you wish but if no Christian parent, Hindu parent, Jewish parent, Sikh paren or atheist parent wishes to send their child then this is hardly the fault of Tauheedul I suppose. They clearly know how to run schools, let them do what they are good at and prosper. DGower
  • Score: 0

1:03am Sat 7 Apr 12

editor1988 says...

DGower wrote:
Whilst I accept that a certain quota of places must be offered to those of a different faith or no faith, I still wonder whether those who bang the integration drum would send their children to Tauheedul Primary or Secondary schools despite their obvious talents in academic leadership and attainment. You can have as big a quota as you wish but if no Christian parent, Hindu parent, Jewish parent, Sikh paren or atheist parent wishes to send their child then this is hardly the fault of Tauheedul I suppose. They clearly know how to run schools, let them do what they are good at and prosper.
Those who bang the integration drum may not because those who are not integrated do not see others as integrated; hence banging the integration drum without doing anything constructive.

However, there are also those who will send their children who recognise integration is a two way process.
[quote][p][bold]DGower[/bold] wrote: Whilst I accept that a certain quota of places must be offered to those of a different faith or no faith, I still wonder whether those who bang the integration drum would send their children to Tauheedul Primary or Secondary schools despite their obvious talents in academic leadership and attainment. You can have as big a quota as you wish but if no Christian parent, Hindu parent, Jewish parent, Sikh paren or atheist parent wishes to send their child then this is hardly the fault of Tauheedul I suppose. They clearly know how to run schools, let them do what they are good at and prosper.[/p][/quote]Those who bang the integration drum may not because those who are not integrated do not see others as integrated; hence banging the integration drum without doing anything constructive. However, there are also those who will send their children who recognise integration is a two way process. editor1988
  • Score: 0

1:06am Sat 7 Apr 12

bnp_fan says...

just looking at the results and these lots website, it seems good

never heard his name before, lord shuttleworth is their patron, so it does look good

dgower is right they know what they doing
just looking at the results and these lots website, it seems good never heard his name before, lord shuttleworth is their patron, so it does look good dgower is right they know what they doing bnp_fan
  • Score: 0

1:09am Sat 7 Apr 12

DGower says...

I just wish people could see beyond the "Islamic" tag attached to these schools and realise that as an educational establishment they must be pretty good at what they do to get the plaudits, results, attainments and high achievements they do. If I had children of school age I'd be applying for a place there for sure!
I just wish people could see beyond the "Islamic" tag attached to these schools and realise that as an educational establishment they must be pretty good at what they do to get the plaudits, results, attainments and high achievements they do. If I had children of school age I'd be applying for a place there for sure! DGower
  • Score: 0

1:14am Sat 7 Apr 12

DGower says...

bnp_fan,

I am going to make a huge assumption (please forgive me if I am wrong) but I suspect that you are a white, European male, like me. If you had children of school age would you consider sending your son or daughter to this particular Islamic school? Yes or no?
bnp_fan, I am going to make a huge assumption (please forgive me if I am wrong) but I suspect that you are a white, European male, like me. If you had children of school age would you consider sending your son or daughter to this particular Islamic school? Yes or no? DGower
  • Score: 0

1:17am Sat 7 Apr 12

bnp_fan says...

you are right in assumption

some of my friends will not like this

i think i would send my son there

i am still anti migrants but i want good education for my child

i think i would go to open evening and decide then
you are right in assumption some of my friends will not like this i think i would send my son there i am still anti migrants but i want good education for my child i think i would go to open evening and decide then bnp_fan
  • Score: 0

1:22am Sat 7 Apr 12

editor1988 says...

Many people jump on the criticism bandwagon but once you find out the reality through research or attending open evenings with an objective mind, you will conclude that Tauheedul is the best choice for your child.
Many people jump on the criticism bandwagon but once you find out the reality through research or attending open evenings with an objective mind, you will conclude that Tauheedul is the best choice for your child. editor1988
  • Score: 0

1:23am Sat 7 Apr 12

DGower says...

I applaud you for seeing beyond the Islamic tag and seeing that as a school, it cannot be faulted. Finally, someone with a bit of sense and rational thought compared to the usual knuckle draggers we get on here.
I applaud you for seeing beyond the Islamic tag and seeing that as a school, it cannot be faulted. Finally, someone with a bit of sense and rational thought compared to the usual knuckle draggers we get on here. DGower
  • Score: 0

1:33am Sat 7 Apr 12

bnp_fan says...

my problem is with migrants who dont speak english

tauheedul lot seem to be better than most of us in english, so thats why i think it good option

i googled these lot and this came

Since the partnership began, there has been a substantial increase in the % of students achieving A*-C.

In 2009 (before the partnership), 11% of students achieved 5A*-Cs with English and Maths.
In 2010 (first year of partnership), 26% of students achieved 5A*-Cs with English and Maths.
In 2011 (second year of partnership), 37% of students achieved 5A*-Cs with English and Maths.
my problem is with migrants who dont speak english tauheedul lot seem to be better than most of us in english, so thats why i think it good option i googled these lot and this came Since the partnership began, there has been a substantial increase in the % of students achieving A*-C. In 2009 (before the partnership), 11% of students achieved 5A*-Cs with English and Maths. In 2010 (first year of partnership), 26% of students achieved 5A*-Cs with English and Maths. In 2011 (second year of partnership), 37% of students achieved 5A*-Cs with English and Maths. bnp_fan
  • Score: 0

1:39am Sat 7 Apr 12

editor1988 says...

The vast majority of the people of Blackburn support Tauheedul, not because it is Tauheedul, but because it strives for educational excellence.

The best person to ask about a school are parents and whilst not claiming to have spoke to every parents, I have not heard a single parent complain.

We should give Tauheedul the credit it deserves and also remember that this school is more than likely to be approved by the government.
The vast majority of the people of Blackburn support Tauheedul, not because it is Tauheedul, but because it strives for educational excellence. The best person to ask about a school are parents and whilst not claiming to have spoke to every parents, I have not heard a single parent complain. We should give Tauheedul the credit it deserves and also remember that this school is more than likely to be approved by the government. editor1988
  • Score: 0

2:06am Sat 7 Apr 12

coolguy says...

excellent news and hope and pray tauheeduls application is granted. lookking through the results and what has been achived in such a short space of time i bet Maureen Bateson is trying to find a Mufti Hamid Patel to run a state school but hasnt found one which is why her comments sound very negative and critical. BwDBC should be proud of the way Tauheedul is run and reading from the comments how diversified it is to put
blackburn on the map in the educational area.
excellent news and hope and pray tauheeduls application is granted. lookking through the results and what has been achived in such a short space of time i bet Maureen Bateson is trying to find a Mufti Hamid Patel to run a state school but hasnt found one which is why her comments sound very negative and critical. BwDBC should be proud of the way Tauheedul is run and reading from the comments how diversified it is to put blackburn on the map in the educational area. coolguy
  • Score: 0

6:01am Sat 7 Apr 12

Graham Hartley says...

bmurtaja wrote:
editor1988 wrote:
blackburn4life wrote:
This is fantastic news. Tauheedul is one of the very few schools which have been rated outstanding by ofsted in Blackburn. They have been invited by the National College for School Leaders to deliver leadership programmes in the north-west. This goes a long way in showing how highly rated the leadership is at tauheedul. All they are doing is that they are applying their experience and expertise in a different setting. Blackburn primary schools are mediocre and lack quality (only one primary school has been rated outstanding by ofsted in Blackburn), so what is the harm in having a school run by people who have a proven track record. As for integration, it will be open to all faiths and backgrounds. Tauheedul has shown how it integrates with the community by supporting a failing school in Blackburn (Blakewater College). Also, there are many articles in the LET archives where it has reported Tauheeduls contribution to non-Muslim charities and organisation. I think it's about time people promoted what they love rather than bashing what they hate.
Excellent comment.

I hope LET takes notice. The standards of journalism at LET are one of the worst. The article has so many mistakes and misleading statements:

1. The first line states "for muslim boys and girls", not withstanding the punctutation error, this is factually incorrect. The school will open to all faith groups. LET journalists should research the Free Schools policy and if they had checked the DfE website, they would have realised a minimum of 50% of places are allocated to members of all faiths and no faith.

2. Paragraph number 2 - 'typical size', what does this mean?

3. Paragrapah number 3 - 'In a letter to prospective parents' - What does this mean? The letter was sent to parents with children. Where does prospective come in. It should read: In a letter to parents of prospective pupils at the school ...
4. 'They are in charge of their own admissions.' This comment is misleading as Free Schools are obliged to adhere to the Admissions Code including the requirement to have an open admissions policy.
5. 'In the pre-application from the trust said:' - A spelling mistake.

With these errors, one starts to think Tauheedul definitely needs to open these schools so 'prospective' LET journalists are equipped with the basic skills of journalism and writing.
editor1988

I hope LET make the amendments.

To conclude for the night, I wish Tauheedul the best and hope the council agrees to work with Tauheedul to improve educational standards in the town.
There is at least one error which appears in the extract from Tauheedul's pre-application and so may not be attributable to LT; 'high powered learning' (sic).
[quote][p][bold]bmurtaja[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]editor1988[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]blackburn4life[/bold] wrote: This is fantastic news. Tauheedul is one of the very few schools which have been rated outstanding by ofsted in Blackburn. They have been invited by the National College for School Leaders to deliver leadership programmes in the north-west. This goes a long way in showing how highly rated the leadership is at tauheedul. All they are doing is that they are applying their experience and expertise in a different setting. Blackburn primary schools are mediocre and lack quality (only one primary school has been rated outstanding by ofsted in Blackburn), so what is the harm in having a school run by people who have a proven track record. As for integration, it will be open to all faiths and backgrounds. Tauheedul has shown how it integrates with the community by supporting a failing school in Blackburn (Blakewater College). Also, there are many articles in the LET archives where it has reported Tauheeduls contribution to non-Muslim charities and organisation. I think it's about time people promoted what they love rather than bashing what they hate.[/p][/quote]Excellent comment. I hope LET takes notice. The standards of journalism at LET are one of the worst. The article has so many mistakes and misleading statements: 1. The first line states "for muslim boys and girls", not withstanding the punctutation error, this is factually incorrect. The school will open to all faith groups. LET journalists should research the Free Schools policy and if they had checked the DfE website, they would have realised a minimum of 50% of places are allocated to members of all faiths and no faith. 2. Paragraph number 2 - 'typical size', what does this mean? 3. Paragrapah number 3 - 'In a letter to prospective parents' - What does this mean? The letter was sent to parents with children. Where does prospective come in. It should read: In a letter to parents of prospective pupils at the school ... 4. 'They are in charge of their own admissions.' This comment is misleading as Free Schools are obliged to adhere to the Admissions Code including the requirement to have an open admissions policy. 5. 'In the pre-application from the trust said:' - A spelling mistake. With these errors, one starts to think Tauheedul definitely needs to open these schools so 'prospective' LET journalists are equipped with the basic skills of journalism and writing.[/p][/quote]editor1988 I hope LET make the amendments. To conclude for the night, I wish Tauheedul the best and hope the council agrees to work with Tauheedul to improve educational standards in the town.[/p][/quote]There is at least one error which appears in the extract from Tauheedul's pre-application and so may not be attributable to LT; 'high powered learning' (sic). Graham Hartley
  • Score: 0

6:20am Sat 7 Apr 12

Graham Hartley says...

Consider this, from a TIGHS press release.

Principal and Chief Executive, (Mufti) Hamid Patel, said: "Our students have achieved amazing results. Their efforts, and that of all of our staff, have been richly rewarded..."

All of us make errors.
Consider this, from a TIGHS press release. Principal and Chief Executive, (Mufti) Hamid Patel, said: "Our students have achieved amazing results. Their efforts, and that of all of our staff, have been richly rewarded..." All of us make errors. Graham Hartley
  • Score: 0

8:06am Sat 7 Apr 12

living the end times in BB1 says...

Supposedly they are making land mines now that look like prayer mats. I hear prophets are going through the roof.
Supposedly they are making land mines now that look like prayer mats. I hear prophets are going through the roof. living the end times in BB1
  • Score: 1

8:26am Sat 7 Apr 12

Rover The Top. says...

Its the future of this town and all east lancashire :(

Larkhill Health Centre will open as a Muslim all Boys School.

You heard it here 1st.
Its the future of this town and all east lancashire :( Larkhill Health Centre will open as a Muslim all Boys School. You heard it here 1st. Rover The Top.
  • Score: 0

8:53am Sat 7 Apr 12

ROVERSCAN says...

What happened to when in Rome live as the Infidels do ????
What happened to when in Rome live as the Infidels do ???? ROVERSCAN
  • Score: 0

9:00am Sat 7 Apr 12

StephenDes says...

Some of the contributers here are giving hysteria a bad name, but for sheer poor taste, 'living the end...' really does take the biscuit. Are you really interested in the future prosperity of our town? You are living testimony to why our town needs a higher quality of school. Anyway, let's get out of the gutter and address the matter in hand, children and educational standards.
Blackburn's Muslim community has shown its willingness to integrate for many years by being happy to send its young people to schools with no faith element, or to Catholic and CoE establishments. Its further desire to integrate was, as demonstrated by the Tauheedul girls' school, a determination to ensure the highest grades possible when leaving school, which it appears to have done with a great deal of success. It is educational under-achievement that is the single greatest contributer to marginalisation in this, or indeed any other country. If Blackburn's Muslims were really serious about not integrating, they wouldn't care less about education.
Given the success of the first school, it's only right and proper that they open up a primary school. Catholics and Anglicans have done this for, well, centuries. Gove, for all his faults, is very very clear when it comes to intake; 50% should be open to people of other faiths or none. He is also very clear about such things as the teaching of creationism. There can be little doubt that the school will thrive and produce smart, polite, respectful, and well-educated young people ready for secondary school. Some of those people of course will not be Muslim, as their parents will have shown their desire to integrate by sending their sons and daughters there, just as Muslims have sent their children to a variety of schools in the past. If the first Tauheedul school had been a complete failure, then I would add my name to the list of those concerned about a primary school. The opposite is the case here. It is staggering that in a debate about education and educational standards the ONLY aspect that has not been mentioned by the anti-brigade is is the results that this school is likely to achieve; why is it that some folk from Blackburn have such low expectations of the youth of our town? Why are you so anti-success? Why are you against one of the most successful schools in the country wanting to try its hand with younger students? If your only counter-arguments depend on feeble attempts to whip up anti-Muslim hysteria, then sadly you are betraying nothing but your own ignorance and your own inability to engage with the a section of our population who are actually trying to do something about educational achievement rather than just moan about it.
Some of the contributers here are giving hysteria a bad name, but for sheer poor taste, 'living the end...' really does take the biscuit. Are you really interested in the future prosperity of our town? You are living testimony to why our town needs a higher quality of school. Anyway, let's get out of the gutter and address the matter in hand, children and educational standards. Blackburn's Muslim community has shown its willingness to integrate for many years by being happy to send its young people to schools with no faith element, or to Catholic and CoE establishments. Its further desire to integrate was, as demonstrated by the Tauheedul girls' school, a determination to ensure the highest grades possible when leaving school, which it appears to have done with a great deal of success. It is educational under-achievement that is the single greatest contributer to marginalisation in this, or indeed any other country. [A profile of many of the young people involved in the riots last summer supports this.] If Blackburn's Muslims were really serious about not integrating, they wouldn't care less about education. Given the success of the first school, it's only right and proper that they open up a primary school. Catholics and Anglicans have done this for, well, centuries. Gove, for all his faults, is very very clear when it comes to intake; 50% should be open to people of other faiths or none. He is also very clear about such things as the teaching of creationism. There can be little doubt that the school will thrive and produce smart, polite, respectful, and well-educated young people ready for secondary school. Some of those people of course will not be Muslim, as their parents will have shown their desire to integrate by sending their sons and daughters there, just as Muslims have sent their children to a variety of schools in the past. If the first Tauheedul school had been a complete failure, then I would add my name to the list of those concerned about a primary school. The opposite is the case here. It is staggering that in a debate about education and educational standards the ONLY aspect that has not been mentioned by the anti-brigade is is the results that this school is likely to achieve; why is it that some folk from Blackburn have such low expectations of the youth of our town? Why are you so anti-success? Why are you against one of the most successful schools in the country wanting to try its hand with younger students? If your only counter-arguments depend on feeble attempts to whip up anti-Muslim hysteria, then sadly you are betraying nothing but your own ignorance and your own inability to engage with the a section of our population who are actually trying to do something about educational achievement rather than just moan about it. StephenDes
  • Score: 0

9:01am Sat 7 Apr 12

living the end times in BB1 says...

"why is it that 90% of Muslim rapes are not reported"..?
"why is it that 90% of Muslim rapes are not reported"..? living the end times in BB1
  • Score: 0

10:22am Sat 7 Apr 12

editor1988 says...

Graham

What is wrong with high powered learning?
Graham What is wrong with high powered learning? editor1988
  • Score: 0

10:24am Sat 7 Apr 12

Coeur de Lion says...

ghanto wrote:
Some comments here are from people who wants publicity from this free mosque

Mosques and school are there to learn and NOT "hear and go" like free foods speach

People goes to mosques like showing very religious but dont learn anything

As soon as they come out they start bnackbiting outside the mosques itself

True and genuine old islam does no longer exists and modern islam
and new rules are made.

Whatever people likes is made islamic and what they dont like is not classed as none-islamic

admit it
I take it you never attended a school that taught ENGLISH. It is little wonder most Asians are unemployable when they attend Muslim schools.
[quote][p][bold]ghanto[/bold] wrote: Some comments here are from people who wants publicity from this free mosque Mosques and school are there to learn and NOT "hear and go" like free foods speach People goes to mosques like showing very religious but dont learn anything As soon as they come out they start bnackbiting outside the mosques itself True and genuine old islam does no longer exists and modern islam and new rules are made. Whatever people likes is made islamic and what they dont like is not classed as none-islamic admit it[/p][/quote]I take it you never attended a school that taught ENGLISH. It is little wonder most Asians are unemployable when they attend Muslim schools. Coeur de Lion
  • Score: 0

10:26am Sat 7 Apr 12

editor1988 says...

coolguy wrote:
excellent news and hope and pray tauheeduls application is granted. lookking through the results and what has been achived in such a short space of time i bet Maureen Bateson is trying to find a Mufti Hamid Patel to run a state school but hasnt found one which is why her comments sound very negative and critical. BwDBC should be proud of the way Tauheedul is run and reading from the comments how diversified it is to put blackburn on the map in the educational area.
Don't understand how Maureen Bateson has become the 'top official'. Perhaps it is indicative of the state of the education system in Blackburn.
[quote][p][bold]coolguy[/bold] wrote: excellent news and hope and pray tauheeduls application is granted. lookking through the results and what has been achived in such a short space of time i bet Maureen Bateson is trying to find a Mufti Hamid Patel to run a state school but hasnt found one which is why her comments sound very negative and critical. BwDBC should be proud of the way Tauheedul is run and reading from the comments how diversified it is to put blackburn on the map in the educational area.[/p][/quote]Don't understand how Maureen Bateson has become the 'top official'. Perhaps it is indicative of the state of the education system in Blackburn. editor1988
  • Score: 0

10:26am Sat 7 Apr 12

Noiticer says...

The St Stephen's old school in Little Harwood is the likely candidate for the location of this establshment as it is lying idle. If the RC's, Anglicans, Methodists, Jews and other faiths can run their own schools why not Muslims? However, this system of faith schools was designed in an age when the UK was monocultural but was even divisive then - just think of Northern Ireland. Now the UK is multicultural and multiracial the presence of faith schools is disaster waiting to happen. How can faith schools which underline the religious, cultural and racial differences and cause segregation possibly make for an harmonious society? I predict trouble in the future.
The St Stephen's old school in Little Harwood is the likely candidate for the location of this establshment as it is lying idle. If the RC's, Anglicans, Methodists, Jews and other faiths can run their own schools why not Muslims? However, this system of faith schools was designed in an age when the UK was monocultural but was even divisive then - just think of Northern Ireland. Now the UK is multicultural and multiracial the presence of faith schools is disaster waiting to happen. How can faith schools which underline the religious, cultural and racial differences and cause segregation possibly make for an harmonious society? I predict trouble in the future. Noiticer
  • Score: 0

10:29am Sat 7 Apr 12

bnp_fan says...

StephenDes wrote:
Some of the contributers here are giving hysteria a bad name, but for sheer poor taste, 'living the end...' really does take the biscuit. Are you really interested in the future prosperity of our town? You are living testimony to why our town needs a higher quality of school. Anyway, let's get out of the gutter and address the matter in hand, children and educational standards.
Blackburn's Muslim community has shown its willingness to integrate for many years by being happy to send its young people to schools with no faith element, or to Catholic and CoE establishments. Its further desire to integrate was, as demonstrated by the Tauheedul girls' school, a determination to ensure the highest grades possible when leaving school, which it appears to have done with a great deal of success. It is educational under-achievement that is the single greatest contributer to marginalisation in this, or indeed any other country. If Blackburn's Muslims were really serious about not integrating, they wouldn't care less about education.
Given the success of the first school, it's only right and proper that they open up a primary school. Catholics and Anglicans have done this for, well, centuries. Gove, for all his faults, is very very clear when it comes to intake; 50% should be open to people of other faiths or none. He is also very clear about such things as the teaching of creationism. There can be little doubt that the school will thrive and produce smart, polite, respectful, and well-educated young people ready for secondary school. Some of those people of course will not be Muslim, as their parents will have shown their desire to integrate by sending their sons and daughters there, just as Muslims have sent their children to a variety of schools in the past. If the first Tauheedul school had been a complete failure, then I would add my name to the list of those concerned about a primary school. The opposite is the case here. It is staggering that in a debate about education and educational standards the ONLY aspect that has not been mentioned by the anti-brigade is is the results that this school is likely to achieve; why is it that some folk from Blackburn have such low expectations of the youth of our town? Why are you so anti-success? Why are you against one of the most successful schools in the country wanting to try its hand with younger students? If your only counter-arguments depend on feeble attempts to whip up anti-Muslim hysteria, then sadly you are betraying nothing but your own ignorance and your own inability to engage with the a section of our population who are actually trying to do something about educational achievement rather than just moan about it.
you make good point

if muzlims like this want to integrate, then this is good

we need to integrate as well with them

we should oppose those who dont speak english
[quote][p][bold]StephenDes[/bold] wrote: Some of the contributers here are giving hysteria a bad name, but for sheer poor taste, 'living the end...' really does take the biscuit. Are you really interested in the future prosperity of our town? You are living testimony to why our town needs a higher quality of school. Anyway, let's get out of the gutter and address the matter in hand, children and educational standards. Blackburn's Muslim community has shown its willingness to integrate for many years by being happy to send its young people to schools with no faith element, or to Catholic and CoE establishments. Its further desire to integrate was, as demonstrated by the Tauheedul girls' school, a determination to ensure the highest grades possible when leaving school, which it appears to have done with a great deal of success. It is educational under-achievement that is the single greatest contributer to marginalisation in this, or indeed any other country. [A profile of many of the young people involved in the riots last summer supports this.] If Blackburn's Muslims were really serious about not integrating, they wouldn't care less about education. Given the success of the first school, it's only right and proper that they open up a primary school. Catholics and Anglicans have done this for, well, centuries. Gove, for all his faults, is very very clear when it comes to intake; 50% should be open to people of other faiths or none. He is also very clear about such things as the teaching of creationism. There can be little doubt that the school will thrive and produce smart, polite, respectful, and well-educated young people ready for secondary school. Some of those people of course will not be Muslim, as their parents will have shown their desire to integrate by sending their sons and daughters there, just as Muslims have sent their children to a variety of schools in the past. If the first Tauheedul school had been a complete failure, then I would add my name to the list of those concerned about a primary school. The opposite is the case here. It is staggering that in a debate about education and educational standards the ONLY aspect that has not been mentioned by the anti-brigade is is the results that this school is likely to achieve; why is it that some folk from Blackburn have such low expectations of the youth of our town? Why are you so anti-success? Why are you against one of the most successful schools in the country wanting to try its hand with younger students? If your only counter-arguments depend on feeble attempts to whip up anti-Muslim hysteria, then sadly you are betraying nothing but your own ignorance and your own inability to engage with the a section of our population who are actually trying to do something about educational achievement rather than just moan about it.[/p][/quote]you make good point if muzlims like this want to integrate, then this is good we need to integrate as well with them we should oppose those who dont speak english bnp_fan
  • Score: 0

10:32am Sat 7 Apr 12

bnp_fan says...

Coeur de Lion wrote:
ghanto wrote:
Some comments here are from people who wants publicity from this free mosque

Mosques and school are there to learn and NOT "hear and go" like free foods speach

People goes to mosques like showing very religious but dont learn anything

As soon as they come out they start bnackbiting outside the mosques itself

True and genuine old islam does no longer exists and modern islam
and new rules are made.

Whatever people likes is made islamic and what they dont like is not classed as none-islamic

admit it
I take it you never attended a school that taught ENGLISH. It is little wonder most Asians are unemployable when they attend Muslim schools.
Quite the opposite. Ghanto did not come to Tauheedul. As one of the best schools in the country, students leave with the best chances of success and gain entry into the best universities.
[quote][p][bold]Coeur de Lion[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]ghanto[/bold] wrote: Some comments here are from people who wants publicity from this free mosque Mosques and school are there to learn and NOT "hear and go" like free foods speach People goes to mosques like showing very religious but dont learn anything As soon as they come out they start bnackbiting outside the mosques itself True and genuine old islam does no longer exists and modern islam and new rules are made. Whatever people likes is made islamic and what they dont like is not classed as none-islamic admit it[/p][/quote]I take it you never attended a school that taught ENGLISH. It is little wonder most Asians are unemployable when they attend Muslim schools.[/p][/quote]Quite the opposite. Ghanto did not come to Tauheedul. As one of the best schools in the country, students leave with the best chances of success and gain entry into the best universities. bnp_fan
  • Score: 0

10:39am Sat 7 Apr 12

bmurtaja says...

StephenDes wrote:
Some of the contributers here are giving hysteria a bad name, but for sheer poor taste, 'living the end...' really does take the biscuit. Are you really interested in the future prosperity of our town? You are living testimony to why our town needs a higher quality of school. Anyway, let's get out of the gutter and address the matter in hand, children and educational standards.
Blackburn's Muslim community has shown its willingness to integrate for many years by being happy to send its young people to schools with no faith element, or to Catholic and CoE establishments. Its further desire to integrate was, as demonstrated by the Tauheedul girls' school, a determination to ensure the highest grades possible when leaving school, which it appears to have done with a great deal of success. It is educational under-achievement that is the single greatest contributer to marginalisation in this, or indeed any other country. If Blackburn's Muslims were really serious about not integrating, they wouldn't care less about education.
Given the success of the first school, it's only right and proper that they open up a primary school. Catholics and Anglicans have done this for, well, centuries. Gove, for all his faults, is very very clear when it comes to intake; 50% should be open to people of other faiths or none. He is also very clear about such things as the teaching of creationism. There can be little doubt that the school will thrive and produce smart, polite, respectful, and well-educated young people ready for secondary school. Some of those people of course will not be Muslim, as their parents will have shown their desire to integrate by sending their sons and daughters there, just as Muslims have sent their children to a variety of schools in the past. If the first Tauheedul school had been a complete failure, then I would add my name to the list of those concerned about a primary school. The opposite is the case here. It is staggering that in a debate about education and educational standards the ONLY aspect that has not been mentioned by the anti-brigade is is the results that this school is likely to achieve; why is it that some folk from Blackburn have such low expectations of the youth of our town? Why are you so anti-success? Why are you against one of the most successful schools in the country wanting to try its hand with younger students? If your only counter-arguments depend on feeble attempts to whip up anti-Muslim hysteria, then sadly you are betraying nothing but your own ignorance and your own inability to engage with the a section of our population who are actually trying to do something about educational achievement rather than just moan about it.
Stephen

You make some excellent points.

Let us all unite and congratulate Tauheedul for their contribution to the educational landscape of Blackburn and wish them success.
[quote][p][bold]StephenDes[/bold] wrote: Some of the contributers here are giving hysteria a bad name, but for sheer poor taste, 'living the end...' really does take the biscuit. Are you really interested in the future prosperity of our town? You are living testimony to why our town needs a higher quality of school. Anyway, let's get out of the gutter and address the matter in hand, children and educational standards. Blackburn's Muslim community has shown its willingness to integrate for many years by being happy to send its young people to schools with no faith element, or to Catholic and CoE establishments. Its further desire to integrate was, as demonstrated by the Tauheedul girls' school, a determination to ensure the highest grades possible when leaving school, which it appears to have done with a great deal of success. It is educational under-achievement that is the single greatest contributer to marginalisation in this, or indeed any other country. [A profile of many of the young people involved in the riots last summer supports this.] If Blackburn's Muslims were really serious about not integrating, they wouldn't care less about education. Given the success of the first school, it's only right and proper that they open up a primary school. Catholics and Anglicans have done this for, well, centuries. Gove, for all his faults, is very very clear when it comes to intake; 50% should be open to people of other faiths or none. He is also very clear about such things as the teaching of creationism. There can be little doubt that the school will thrive and produce smart, polite, respectful, and well-educated young people ready for secondary school. Some of those people of course will not be Muslim, as their parents will have shown their desire to integrate by sending their sons and daughters there, just as Muslims have sent their children to a variety of schools in the past. If the first Tauheedul school had been a complete failure, then I would add my name to the list of those concerned about a primary school. The opposite is the case here. It is staggering that in a debate about education and educational standards the ONLY aspect that has not been mentioned by the anti-brigade is is the results that this school is likely to achieve; why is it that some folk from Blackburn have such low expectations of the youth of our town? Why are you so anti-success? Why are you against one of the most successful schools in the country wanting to try its hand with younger students? If your only counter-arguments depend on feeble attempts to whip up anti-Muslim hysteria, then sadly you are betraying nothing but your own ignorance and your own inability to engage with the a section of our population who are actually trying to do something about educational achievement rather than just moan about it.[/p][/quote]Stephen You make some excellent points. Let us all unite and congratulate Tauheedul for their contribution to the educational landscape of Blackburn and wish them success. bmurtaja
  • Score: 0

10:45am Sat 7 Apr 12

editor1988 says...

The minority of critics and anti-Muslim 'ranters' will have to accept that Tauheedul is the best educational provider in Blackburn and will also have to accept that the educational standards in some of the other schools are shameful.

So, if Tauheedul are planning to open a primary school, I wish them all the best and I also hope they open these schools across the country and also take over some of the colleges.
The minority of critics and anti-Muslim 'ranters' will have to accept that Tauheedul is the best educational provider in Blackburn and will also have to accept that the educational standards in some of the other schools are shameful. So, if Tauheedul are planning to open a primary school, I wish them all the best and I also hope they open these schools across the country and also take over some of the colleges. editor1988
  • Score: 0

10:49am Sat 7 Apr 12

bmurtaja says...

Noiticer

I have made several posts in the past regarding faith schools. You have every right to disagree with faith schools but it is important to recognise that faith schools outperform their counterpart schools and if other faith groups have the right to establish faith schools, then the Muslim community should also be entitled especially where success is proven.
Noiticer I have made several posts in the past regarding faith schools. You have every right to disagree with faith schools but it is important to recognise that faith schools outperform their counterpart schools and if other faith groups have the right to establish faith schools, then the Muslim community should also be entitled especially where success is proven. bmurtaja
  • Score: 0

10:53am Sat 7 Apr 12

bmurtaja says...

bnp_fan wrote:
my problem is with migrants who dont speak english

tauheedul lot seem to be better than most of us in english, so thats why i think it good option

i googled these lot and this came

Since the partnership began, there has been a substantial increase in the % of students achieving A*-C.

In 2009 (before the partnership), 11% of students achieved 5A*-Cs with English and Maths.
In 2010 (first year of partnership), 26% of students achieved 5A*-Cs with English and Maths.
In 2011 (second year of partnership), 37% of students achieved 5A*-Cs with English and Maths.
This is remarkable.

I wonder if the critics knew how many non-Muslims there are at Blakewater? At least 80%.

I don't think there is any example of any other faith group doing something similar in Blackburn.

Well done to Tauheedul.
[quote][p][bold]bnp_fan[/bold] wrote: my problem is with migrants who dont speak english tauheedul lot seem to be better than most of us in english, so thats why i think it good option i googled these lot and this came Since the partnership began, there has been a substantial increase in the % of students achieving A*-C. In 2009 (before the partnership), 11% of students achieved 5A*-Cs with English and Maths. In 2010 (first year of partnership), 26% of students achieved 5A*-Cs with English and Maths. In 2011 (second year of partnership), 37% of students achieved 5A*-Cs with English and Maths.[/p][/quote]This is remarkable. I wonder if the critics knew how many non-Muslims there are at Blakewater? At least 80%. I don't think there is any example of any other faith group doing something similar in Blackburn. Well done to Tauheedul. bmurtaja
  • Score: 0

10:58am Sat 7 Apr 12

editor1988 says...

Look at this story

http://www.lancashir
etelegraph.co.uk/new
s/9174269.Blackburn_
school_s___11k_gift_
takes_hospice_appeal
_to___67_000/

Any other schools in Blackburn that has integrated in this manner?
Look at this story http://www.lancashir etelegraph.co.uk/new s/9174269.Blackburn_ school_s___11k_gift_ takes_hospice_appeal _to___67_000/ Any other schools in Blackburn that has integrated in this manner? editor1988
  • Score: 0

11:38am Sat 7 Apr 12

Graham Hartley says...

editor1988 wrote:
Graham

What is wrong with high powered learning?
I prefer 'high-powered learning'. The distinction is best made when considering our correspondents here. Are we a cross-section or a cross section of the public?
[quote][p][bold]editor1988[/bold] wrote: Graham What is wrong with high powered learning?[/p][/quote]I prefer 'high-powered learning'. The distinction is best made when considering our correspondents here. Are we a cross-section or a cross section of the public? Graham Hartley
  • Score: 0

11:55am Sat 7 Apr 12

bmurtaja says...

You are right Graham.

I would not be surprised if LET has omitted it.

The author of the article has also gone missing.
You are right Graham. I would not be surprised if LET has omitted it. The author of the article has also gone missing. bmurtaja
  • Score: 0

2:46pm Sat 7 Apr 12

wulver says...

You're kidding right ??? When are we going to learn ???
You're kidding right ??? When are we going to learn ??? wulver
  • Score: 0

3:43pm Sat 7 Apr 12

jack daniels says...

editor1988 wrote:
Look at this story

http://www.lancashir

etelegraph.co.uk/new

s/9174269.Blackburn_

school_s___11k_gift_

takes_hospice_appeal

_to___67_000/

Any other schools in Blackburn that has integrated in this manner?
As for your little web link. Other schools contribute to many other charities but don't make such a fuss. All schools are also asked to promote community cohesion and Taheedal just pay lip service like every other. Taheedal cherry pick their pupils and 'encourage' parent involvement both at school and at the mosque.
[quote][p][bold]editor1988[/bold] wrote: Look at this story http://www.lancashir etelegraph.co.uk/new s/9174269.Blackburn_ school_s___11k_gift_ takes_hospice_appeal _to___67_000/ Any other schools in Blackburn that has integrated in this manner?[/p][/quote]As for your little web link. Other schools contribute to many other charities but don't make such a fuss. All schools are also asked to promote community cohesion and Taheedal just pay lip service like every other. Taheedal cherry pick their pupils and 'encourage' parent involvement both at school and at the mosque. jack daniels
  • Score: 0

3:46pm Sat 7 Apr 12

jack daniels says...

As quoted from the official Tuheedal addmissions school policy.

"It is conducted as an Islamic school in accordance with the teachings of the Deobandi Hanafi Tablighi school of
thought. As such, the school’s Admission Policy provides for entry for all female students, with preference given to those families who adhere to the Deobandi Hanafi Tablighi teachings of the Islamic faith and who are part of

the communities served by Masjid-e-Tauheedul Islam, Masjidal Hidayah, Masjid-e-Irfan and Masjid-e-Anisul Islam."

Also -

"Oversubscription Criteria, listed below in order of priority:

1. Looked after girls (girls in public care) of the Muslim faith.

2. Girls whose parents are members of, or women who receive the membership benefits of, Masjid-e-

Tauheedul Islam.¹

3. Girls whose parents are members of, or women who receive the membership benefits of, Masjid al

Hidayah, Masjid-e-Irfan and Masjid-e-Anisul Islam.¹"

So, lets be honest, this is far from integration. It's keeping one set of people from another. It's ensuring these muslim girls don't come into contact with us non-believers. We will have children from the asian community, living in a western country, who will not interact with a westerner.
As quoted from the official Tuheedal addmissions school policy. "It is conducted as an Islamic school in accordance with the teachings of the Deobandi Hanafi Tablighi school of thought. As such, the school’s Admission Policy provides for entry for all female students, with preference given to those families who adhere to the Deobandi Hanafi Tablighi teachings of the Islamic faith and who are part of the communities served by Masjid-e-Tauheedul Islam, Masjidal Hidayah, Masjid-e-Irfan and Masjid-e-Anisul Islam." Also - "Oversubscription Criteria, listed below in order of priority: 1. Looked after girls (girls in public care) of the Muslim faith. 2. Girls whose parents are members of, or women who receive the membership benefits of, Masjid-e- Tauheedul Islam.¹ 3. Girls whose parents are members of, or women who receive the membership benefits of, Masjid al Hidayah, Masjid-e-Irfan and Masjid-e-Anisul Islam.¹" So, lets be honest, this is far from integration. It's keeping one set of people from another. It's ensuring these muslim girls don't come into contact with us non-believers. We will have children from the asian community, living in a western country, who will not interact with a westerner. jack daniels
  • Score: 0

3:55pm Sat 7 Apr 12

jack daniels says...

bmurtaja wrote:
This is excellent news for Blackburn. The whole idea of the Free Schools policy is to enable excellent educational providers like Tauheedul to establish schools in places like Blackburn where councillors like Maureen Bateson have failed the local people. You just have to see the state of some of the primary school such as St Stephens and St Silas and the Ofsted inspections and the results speak for themselves.

So I hope Tauheedul establish more schools in Blackburn and just as the council was forced to give Blakewater College to Tauheedul, I hope Tauheedul takes more responsibility for schools in Blackburn as the council has failed, and failed for too long.

Well done Tauheedul and I am confident your application will be approved by the Department for Education.
the reason these school failed, is in part, to the family back grounds of the pupils it attracted. If you look at the OFSTED reports of most of the poor schools with high asian pupil attendance, you will see that English is spoken as a second language in many homes and that because these are extremely poor families, from poor parts of India, Pakistan and Bangladesh, basic needs such as food, warmth and clothing are a significant issue.

Blame the council all you want, but the real blame for the failing, as pointed out by OFSTED, is the lack of money to pay for additional teaching support because of immigration.
[quote][p][bold]bmurtaja[/bold] wrote: This is excellent news for Blackburn. The whole idea of the Free Schools policy is to enable excellent educational providers like Tauheedul to establish schools in places like Blackburn where councillors like Maureen Bateson have failed the local people. You just have to see the state of some of the primary school such as St Stephens and St Silas and the Ofsted inspections and the results speak for themselves. So I hope Tauheedul establish more schools in Blackburn and just as the council was forced to give Blakewater College to Tauheedul, I hope Tauheedul takes more responsibility for schools in Blackburn as the council has failed, and failed for too long. Well done Tauheedul and I am confident your application will be approved by the Department for Education.[/p][/quote]the reason these school failed, is in part, to the family back grounds of the pupils it attracted. If you look at the OFSTED reports of most of the poor schools with high asian pupil attendance, you will see that English is spoken as a second language in many homes and that because these are extremely poor families, from poor parts of India, Pakistan and Bangladesh, basic needs such as food, warmth and clothing are a significant issue. Blame the council all you want, but the real blame for the failing, as pointed out by OFSTED, is the lack of money to pay for additional teaching support because of immigration. jack daniels
  • Score: 0

4:20pm Sat 7 Apr 12

bmurtaja says...

jack daniels wrote:
bmurtaja wrote:
This is excellent news for Blackburn. The whole idea of the Free Schools policy is to enable excellent educational providers like Tauheedul to establish schools in places like Blackburn where councillors like Maureen Bateson have failed the local people. You just have to see the state of some of the primary school such as St Stephens and St Silas and the Ofsted inspections and the results speak for themselves.

So I hope Tauheedul establish more schools in Blackburn and just as the council was forced to give Blakewater College to Tauheedul, I hope Tauheedul takes more responsibility for schools in Blackburn as the council has failed, and failed for too long.

Well done Tauheedul and I am confident your application will be approved by the Department for Education.
the reason these school failed, is in part, to the family back grounds of the pupils it attracted. If you look at the OFSTED reports of most of the poor schools with high asian pupil attendance, you will see that English is spoken as a second language in many homes and that because these are extremely poor families, from poor parts of India, Pakistan and Bangladesh, basic needs such as food, warmth and clothing are a significant issue.

Blame the council all you want, but the real blame for the failing, as pointed out by OFSTED, is the lack of money to pay for additional teaching support because of immigration.
Jack

Your arguments are contradictory. On the one hand you blame Asian pupils for the failure of the schools but then are not willing to acknowledge that Tauheedul has turned this around. Why is it that St Wilfrids and St Bedes are not outstanding? Why is that both do not get any where near the 98% that Tauheedul gets? All three schools get the same amount of funding per pupil.
[quote][p][bold]jack daniels[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]bmurtaja[/bold] wrote: This is excellent news for Blackburn. The whole idea of the Free Schools policy is to enable excellent educational providers like Tauheedul to establish schools in places like Blackburn where councillors like Maureen Bateson have failed the local people. You just have to see the state of some of the primary school such as St Stephens and St Silas and the Ofsted inspections and the results speak for themselves. So I hope Tauheedul establish more schools in Blackburn and just as the council was forced to give Blakewater College to Tauheedul, I hope Tauheedul takes more responsibility for schools in Blackburn as the council has failed, and failed for too long. Well done Tauheedul and I am confident your application will be approved by the Department for Education.[/p][/quote]the reason these school failed, is in part, to the family back grounds of the pupils it attracted. If you look at the OFSTED reports of most of the poor schools with high asian pupil attendance, you will see that English is spoken as a second language in many homes and that because these are extremely poor families, from poor parts of India, Pakistan and Bangladesh, basic needs such as food, warmth and clothing are a significant issue. Blame the council all you want, but the real blame for the failing, as pointed out by OFSTED, is the lack of money to pay for additional teaching support because of immigration.[/p][/quote]Jack Your arguments are contradictory. On the one hand you blame Asian pupils for the failure of the schools but then are not willing to acknowledge that Tauheedul has turned this around. Why is it that St Wilfrids and St Bedes are not outstanding? Why is that both do not get any where near the 98% that Tauheedul gets? All three schools get the same amount of funding per pupil. bmurtaja
  • Score: 0

4:27pm Sat 7 Apr 12

Malthus says...

Religion of any kind should not be taught in schools. As a tax paying atheist I resent paying towards the perpetuation of fairy stories. It will not be long before Creationism is being taught instead of real science in all schools.
Religion of any kind should not be taught in schools. As a tax paying atheist I resent paying towards the perpetuation of fairy stories. It will not be long before Creationism is being taught instead of real science in all schools. Malthus
  • Score: 1

4:27pm Sat 7 Apr 12

editor1988 says...

jack daniels wrote:
editor1988 wrote: Look at this story http://www.lancashir etelegraph.co.uk/new s/9174269.Blackburn_ school_s___11k_gift_ takes_hospice_appeal _to___67_000/ Any other schools in Blackburn that has integrated in this manner?
As for your little web link. Other schools contribute to many other charities but don't make such a fuss. All schools are also asked to promote community cohesion and Taheedal just pay lip service like every other. Taheedal cherry pick their pupils and 'encourage' parent involvement both at school and at the mosque.
Jack

Can you give an example of any school in Blackburn including those that are double the size of Tauheedul that have raised more charitable funds than Tauheedul? If donating thousands of pounds to hospitals and charities is lip service, then I suggest you ask the elderly in the hospitals who have benefited as a result. As regards admissions policy, all faith schools have some form of faith based criteria including St Wilfrids. Why can Tauheedul not have a faith based admissions policy?

Also, note the faith based criteria is only for 50% of places unlike St Wilfrids and St Bedes and other faith schools. This is clearly mentioned in the TIBHS admissions policy.
[quote][p][bold]jack daniels[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]editor1988[/bold] wrote: Look at this story http://www.lancashir etelegraph.co.uk/new s/9174269.Blackburn_ school_s___11k_gift_ takes_hospice_appeal _to___67_000/ Any other schools in Blackburn that has integrated in this manner?[/p][/quote]As for your little web link. Other schools contribute to many other charities but don't make such a fuss. All schools are also asked to promote community cohesion and Taheedal just pay lip service like every other. Taheedal cherry pick their pupils and 'encourage' parent involvement both at school and at the mosque.[/p][/quote]Jack Can you give an example of any school in Blackburn including those that are double the size of Tauheedul that have raised more charitable funds than Tauheedul? If donating thousands of pounds to hospitals and charities is lip service, then I suggest you ask the elderly in the hospitals who have benefited as a result. As regards admissions policy, all faith schools have some form of faith based criteria including St Wilfrids. Why can Tauheedul not have a faith based admissions policy? Also, note the faith based criteria is only for 50% of places unlike St Wilfrids and St Bedes and other faith schools. This is clearly mentioned in the TIBHS admissions policy. editor1988
  • Score: 0

4:30pm Sat 7 Apr 12

bmurtaja says...

Malthus wrote:
Religion of any kind should not be taught in schools. As a tax paying atheist I resent paying towards the perpetuation of fairy stories. It will not be long before Creationism is being taught instead of real science in all schools.
Malthus

Can I remind you that people of faith also pay tax and whilst it is right that your views translate into policy and manifest into the choice of non faith schools, people of faith have every right to establish faith schools and teach religion. Also be aware that under the Free Schools policy, creationism cannot be taught as part of the science curriculum.
[quote][p][bold]Malthus[/bold] wrote: Religion of any kind should not be taught in schools. As a tax paying atheist I resent paying towards the perpetuation of fairy stories. It will not be long before Creationism is being taught instead of real science in all schools.[/p][/quote]Malthus Can I remind you that people of faith also pay tax and whilst it is right that your views translate into policy and manifest into the choice of non faith schools, people of faith have every right to establish faith schools and teach religion. Also be aware that under the Free Schools policy, creationism cannot be taught as part of the science curriculum. bmurtaja
  • Score: 0

4:36pm Sat 7 Apr 12

Kingkhan1 says...

Seems like Jack Daniels has had one too many of his namesake.

He has got his knickers in a twist about one school, but why is it that a third of the schools in the borough have over 90% Asians ... So much for Maureen Bateson's 'strategic planning' eh!

If all the critics are so worried about social cohesion, then why not send your kids to one of these schools ... Or dare I say one of the Tauheedul schools.

Stop blaming a single school for Blackburn's cohesion challenges. May I suggest that the critics look in the mirror first, and ask yourself what you have done for social cohesion - except for rant on in places like this of course. If you are really that bothered, go out and do something productive!
Seems like Jack Daniels has had one too many of his namesake. He has got his knickers in a twist about one school, but why is it that a third of the schools in the borough have over 90% Asians ... So much for Maureen Bateson's 'strategic planning' eh! If all the critics are so worried about social cohesion, then why not send your kids to one of these schools ... Or dare I say one of the Tauheedul schools. Stop blaming a single school for Blackburn's cohesion challenges. May I suggest that the critics look in the mirror first, and ask yourself what you have done for social cohesion - except for rant on in places like this of course. If you are really that bothered, go out and do something productive! Kingkhan1
  • Score: 0

4:38pm Sat 7 Apr 12

Abdul Qadir Qadiri says...

If you are concerned like me about the consequences this school will have (if approved) like the worsening of segregation in the town and worse the please sign this petition to highlight your concern. Maybe we can make a difference!!!
http://www.change.or
g/petitions/departme
nt-of-education-to-r
efuse-the-applicatio
n-for-the-olive-free
-primary-school-blac
kburn
If you are concerned like me about the consequences this school will have (if approved) like the worsening of segregation in the town and worse the please sign this petition to highlight your concern. Maybe we can make a difference!!! http://www.change.or g/petitions/departme nt-of-education-to-r efuse-the-applicatio n-for-the-olive-free -primary-school-blac kburn Abdul Qadir Qadiri
  • Score: 0

4:56pm Sat 7 Apr 12

jack daniels says...

bmurtaja wrote:
jack daniels wrote:
bmurtaja wrote:
This is excellent news for Blackburn. The whole idea of the Free Schools policy is to enable excellent educational providers like Tauheedul to establish schools in places like Blackburn where councillors like Maureen Bateson have failed the local people. You just have to see the state of some of the primary school such as St Stephens and St Silas and the Ofsted inspections and the results speak for themselves.

So I hope Tauheedul establish more schools in Blackburn and just as the council was forced to give Blakewater College to Tauheedul, I hope Tauheedul takes more responsibility for schools in Blackburn as the council has failed, and failed for too long.

Well done Tauheedul and I am confident your application will be approved by the Department for Education.
the reason these school failed, is in part, to the family back grounds of the pupils it attracted. If you look at the OFSTED reports of most of the poor schools with high asian pupil attendance, you will see that English is spoken as a second language in many homes and that because these are extremely poor families, from poor parts of India, Pakistan and Bangladesh, basic needs such as food, warmth and clothing are a significant issue.

Blame the council all you want, but the real blame for the failing, as pointed out by OFSTED, is the lack of money to pay for additional teaching support because of immigration.
Jack

Your arguments are contradictory. On the one hand you blame Asian pupils for the failure of the schools but then are not willing to acknowledge that Tauheedul has turned this around. Why is it that St Wilfrids and St Bedes are not outstanding? Why is that both do not get any where near the 98% that Tauheedul gets? All three schools get the same amount of funding per pupil.
Easy. They are small schools that select their pupil intake. Taheedal also takes money donations from parents and either directly or through the mosque, so that's not quite true is it.
[quote][p][bold]bmurtaja[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]jack daniels[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]bmurtaja[/bold] wrote: This is excellent news for Blackburn. The whole idea of the Free Schools policy is to enable excellent educational providers like Tauheedul to establish schools in places like Blackburn where councillors like Maureen Bateson have failed the local people. You just have to see the state of some of the primary school such as St Stephens and St Silas and the Ofsted inspections and the results speak for themselves. So I hope Tauheedul establish more schools in Blackburn and just as the council was forced to give Blakewater College to Tauheedul, I hope Tauheedul takes more responsibility for schools in Blackburn as the council has failed, and failed for too long. Well done Tauheedul and I am confident your application will be approved by the Department for Education.[/p][/quote]the reason these school failed, is in part, to the family back grounds of the pupils it attracted. If you look at the OFSTED reports of most of the poor schools with high asian pupil attendance, you will see that English is spoken as a second language in many homes and that because these are extremely poor families, from poor parts of India, Pakistan and Bangladesh, basic needs such as food, warmth and clothing are a significant issue. Blame the council all you want, but the real blame for the failing, as pointed out by OFSTED, is the lack of money to pay for additional teaching support because of immigration.[/p][/quote]Jack Your arguments are contradictory. On the one hand you blame Asian pupils for the failure of the schools but then are not willing to acknowledge that Tauheedul has turned this around. Why is it that St Wilfrids and St Bedes are not outstanding? Why is that both do not get any where near the 98% that Tauheedul gets? All three schools get the same amount of funding per pupil.[/p][/quote]Easy. They are small schools that select their pupil intake. Taheedal also takes money donations from parents and either directly or through the mosque, so that's not quite true is it. jack daniels
  • Score: 0

5:05pm Sat 7 Apr 12

StephenDes says...

It was only a matter of time before Mr. Daniels jumped on his old, now rather tired hobby horse of attempting to justify prejudice - because that's what it is - with some even more tired cliches. So Tauheedul somehow 'cherry picks' its pupils. This is not the case; the admissions code is not different to any other faith school, and is based on mosque membership, amongst other things. At a Catholic school it would be church membership. The school's catchment area encompasses some of the poorer parts of Blackburn; in what way is this 'cherry picking'? Selecting the least advantaged perhaps?
To the correspondent who is advocating opposition to ...'those who don't speak English', I'm not really sure what he's suggesting here. I think that Tauheedul scored 100% A* - C in English Language last year, so obviously he doesn't mean them. We should also be careful when we use words like 'oppose...'; people might get the wrong idea, imagine a Muslim saying that...
Jack continues to be concerned about young Muslims who will '... not interact with a Westerner'. That would be a worry, if it were true. I think it's reasonable to expect interaction from people who respect you and your beliefs, it's rather hard to interact with some-one who believes that your faith in barbaric, you cannot speak English, and that you wish to play no part in wider British society. It takes two to interact Jack.
It was only a matter of time before Mr. Daniels jumped on his old, now rather tired hobby horse of attempting to justify prejudice - because that's what it is - with some even more tired cliches. So Tauheedul [and that's how you spell it Jack, pay attention at the back!] somehow 'cherry picks' its pupils. This is not the case; the admissions code is not different to any other faith school, and is based on mosque membership, amongst other things. At a Catholic school it would be church membership. The school's catchment area encompasses some of the poorer parts of Blackburn; in what way is this 'cherry picking'? Selecting the least advantaged perhaps? To the correspondent ['bnp fan' - who clearly uses the same spell check as Jack - 'muzlims?!?!?!'] who is advocating opposition to ...'those who don't speak English', I'm not really sure what he's suggesting here. I think that Tauheedul scored 100% A* - C in English Language last year, so obviously he doesn't mean them. We should also be careful when we use words like 'oppose...'; people might get the wrong idea, imagine a Muslim saying that... Jack continues to be concerned about young Muslims who will '... not interact with a Westerner'. That would be a worry, if it were true. I think it's reasonable to expect interaction from people who respect you and your beliefs, it's rather hard to interact with some-one who believes that your faith in barbaric, you cannot speak English, and that you wish to play no part in wider British society. It takes two to interact Jack. StephenDes
  • Score: 0

5:05pm Sat 7 Apr 12

Germanbite says...

jack daniels wrote:
Another school, backed by a mosque which is funded by a foreign country that follows an extremist form of Islam. At what point are our politicians going to admit we have a serious problem.
Absolutely spot on.
[quote][p][bold]jack daniels[/bold] wrote: Another school, backed by a mosque which is funded by a foreign country that follows an extremist form of Islam. At what point are our politicians going to admit we have a serious problem.[/p][/quote]Absolutely spot on. Germanbite
  • Score: 0

5:08pm Sat 7 Apr 12

jack daniels says...

editor1988 wrote:
jack daniels wrote:
editor1988 wrote: Look at this story http://www.lancashir etelegraph.co.uk/new s/9174269.Blackburn_ school_s___11k_gift_ takes_hospice_appeal _to___67_000/ Any other schools in Blackburn that has integrated in this manner?
As for your little web link. Other schools contribute to many other charities but don't make such a fuss. All schools are also asked to promote community cohesion and Taheedal just pay lip service like every other. Taheedal cherry pick their pupils and 'encourage' parent involvement both at school and at the mosque.
Jack

Can you give an example of any school in Blackburn including those that are double the size of Tauheedul that have raised more charitable funds than Tauheedul? If donating thousands of pounds to hospitals and charities is lip service, then I suggest you ask the elderly in the hospitals who have benefited as a result. As regards admissions policy, all faith schools have some form of faith based criteria including St Wilfrids. Why can Tauheedul not have a faith based admissions policy?

Also, note the faith based criteria is only for 50% of places unlike St Wilfrids and St Bedes and other faith schools. This is clearly mentioned in the TIBHS admissions policy.
We should remove ALL religion from schools so you can drop the 'St Wilfrids do it so why can't we argument'.

Why are you linking charity and community integration together? They are not really the same if the charities Tauheedul contribute to are based in Pakistan or are used by Asian heritage people.

This therefore justifies my lip service comment as the Tauheedul pupils will still not mix with other kids and live parallel lives.
[quote][p][bold]editor1988[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]jack daniels[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]editor1988[/bold] wrote: Look at this story http://www.lancashir etelegraph.co.uk/new s/9174269.Blackburn_ school_s___11k_gift_ takes_hospice_appeal _to___67_000/ Any other schools in Blackburn that has integrated in this manner?[/p][/quote]As for your little web link. Other schools contribute to many other charities but don't make such a fuss. All schools are also asked to promote community cohesion and Taheedal just pay lip service like every other. Taheedal cherry pick their pupils and 'encourage' parent involvement both at school and at the mosque.[/p][/quote]Jack Can you give an example of any school in Blackburn including those that are double the size of Tauheedul that have raised more charitable funds than Tauheedul? If donating thousands of pounds to hospitals and charities is lip service, then I suggest you ask the elderly in the hospitals who have benefited as a result. As regards admissions policy, all faith schools have some form of faith based criteria including St Wilfrids. Why can Tauheedul not have a faith based admissions policy? Also, note the faith based criteria is only for 50% of places unlike St Wilfrids and St Bedes and other faith schools. This is clearly mentioned in the TIBHS admissions policy.[/p][/quote]We should remove ALL religion from schools so you can drop the 'St Wilfrids do it so why can't we argument'. Why are you linking charity and community integration together? They are not really the same if the charities Tauheedul contribute to are based in Pakistan or are used by Asian heritage people. This therefore justifies my lip service comment as the Tauheedul pupils will still not mix with other kids and live parallel lives. jack daniels
  • Score: 0

5:11pm Sat 7 Apr 12

sonny says...

What if catholic schools started to stop funding catholic schools untill they stopped allowing none catholics in.
What if catholic schools started to stop funding catholic schools untill they stopped allowing none catholics in. sonny
  • Score: 0

5:12pm Sat 7 Apr 12

kenny08 says...

hahahahahahahahaha what a joke .
hahahahahahahahaha what a joke . kenny08
  • Score: 0

5:17pm Sat 7 Apr 12

jack daniels says...

StephenDes wrote:
It was only a matter of time before Mr. Daniels jumped on his old, now rather tired hobby horse of attempting to justify prejudice - because that's what it is - with some even more tired cliches. So Tauheedul somehow 'cherry picks' its pupils. This is not the case; the admissions code is not different to any other faith school, and is based on mosque membership, amongst other things. At a Catholic school it would be church membership. The school's catchment area encompasses some of the poorer parts of Blackburn; in what way is this 'cherry picking'? Selecting the least advantaged perhaps?
To the correspondent who is advocating opposition to ...'those who don't speak English', I'm not really sure what he's suggesting here. I think that Tauheedul scored 100% A* - C in English Language last year, so obviously he doesn't mean them. We should also be careful when we use words like 'oppose...'; people might get the wrong idea, imagine a Muslim saying that...
Jack continues to be concerned about young Muslims who will '... not interact with a Westerner'. That would be a worry, if it were true. I think it's reasonable to expect interaction from people who respect you and your beliefs, it's rather hard to interact with some-one who believes that your faith in barbaric, you cannot speak English, and that you wish to play no part in wider British society. It takes two to interact Jack.
I may be old and tired but I still type the truth. It's rather uplifting because I can't recall communicating with you so I must be getting famous!!

I have tried this 'it takes two to interact' and it really does not work.

If all I do is point out how wrong this kind of school is, then I've done a good thing.
[quote][p][bold]StephenDes[/bold] wrote: It was only a matter of time before Mr. Daniels jumped on his old, now rather tired hobby horse of attempting to justify prejudice - because that's what it is - with some even more tired cliches. So Tauheedul [and that's how you spell it Jack, pay attention at the back!] somehow 'cherry picks' its pupils. This is not the case; the admissions code is not different to any other faith school, and is based on mosque membership, amongst other things. At a Catholic school it would be church membership. The school's catchment area encompasses some of the poorer parts of Blackburn; in what way is this 'cherry picking'? Selecting the least advantaged perhaps? To the correspondent ['bnp fan' - who clearly uses the same spell check as Jack - 'muzlims?!?!?!'] who is advocating opposition to ...'those who don't speak English', I'm not really sure what he's suggesting here. I think that Tauheedul scored 100% A* - C in English Language last year, so obviously he doesn't mean them. We should also be careful when we use words like 'oppose...'; people might get the wrong idea, imagine a Muslim saying that... Jack continues to be concerned about young Muslims who will '... not interact with a Westerner'. That would be a worry, if it were true. I think it's reasonable to expect interaction from people who respect you and your beliefs, it's rather hard to interact with some-one who believes that your faith in barbaric, you cannot speak English, and that you wish to play no part in wider British society. It takes two to interact Jack.[/p][/quote]I may be old and tired but I still type the truth. It's rather uplifting because I can't recall communicating with you so I must be getting famous!! I have tried this 'it takes two to interact' and it really does not work. If all I do is point out how wrong this kind of school is, then I've done a good thing. jack daniels
  • Score: 0

5:23pm Sat 7 Apr 12

StephenDes says...

Which foreign country, exactly? In what way 'extremist'? Unless good GCSEs are a new extremist tactic to attack 'Western values'.
Which foreign country, exactly? In what way 'extremist'? Unless good GCSEs are a new extremist tactic to attack 'Western values'. StephenDes
  • Score: 0

5:24pm Sat 7 Apr 12

bmurtaja says...

jack daniels wrote:
editor1988 wrote:
jack daniels wrote:
editor1988 wrote: Look at this story http://www.lancashir etelegraph.co.uk/new s/9174269.Blackburn_ school_s___11k_gift_ takes_hospice_appeal _to___67_000/ Any other schools in Blackburn that has integrated in this manner?
As for your little web link. Other schools contribute to many other charities but don't make such a fuss. All schools are also asked to promote community cohesion and Taheedal just pay lip service like every other. Taheedal cherry pick their pupils and 'encourage' parent involvement both at school and at the mosque.
Jack

Can you give an example of any school in Blackburn including those that are double the size of Tauheedul that have raised more charitable funds than Tauheedul? If donating thousands of pounds to hospitals and charities is lip service, then I suggest you ask the elderly in the hospitals who have benefited as a result. As regards admissions policy, all faith schools have some form of faith based criteria including St Wilfrids. Why can Tauheedul not have a faith based admissions policy?

Also, note the faith based criteria is only for 50% of places unlike St Wilfrids and St Bedes and other faith schools. This is clearly mentioned in the TIBHS admissions policy.
We should remove ALL religion from schools so you can drop the 'St Wilfrids do it so why can't we argument'.

Why are you linking charity and community integration together? They are not really the same if the charities Tauheedul contribute to are based in Pakistan or are used by Asian heritage people.

This therefore justifies my lip service comment as the Tauheedul pupils will still not mix with other kids and live parallel lives.
Jack

I very much doubt anyone will listen to you. When this schools opens, it will be heavily oversubscribed.

As for your charity point, do you know that East Lancashire Hospice also serves non-Muslims and so does Cancer Research.
[quote][p][bold]jack daniels[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]editor1988[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]jack daniels[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]editor1988[/bold] wrote: Look at this story http://www.lancashir etelegraph.co.uk/new s/9174269.Blackburn_ school_s___11k_gift_ takes_hospice_appeal _to___67_000/ Any other schools in Blackburn that has integrated in this manner?[/p][/quote]As for your little web link. Other schools contribute to many other charities but don't make such a fuss. All schools are also asked to promote community cohesion and Taheedal just pay lip service like every other. Taheedal cherry pick their pupils and 'encourage' parent involvement both at school and at the mosque.[/p][/quote]Jack Can you give an example of any school in Blackburn including those that are double the size of Tauheedul that have raised more charitable funds than Tauheedul? If donating thousands of pounds to hospitals and charities is lip service, then I suggest you ask the elderly in the hospitals who have benefited as a result. As regards admissions policy, all faith schools have some form of faith based criteria including St Wilfrids. Why can Tauheedul not have a faith based admissions policy? Also, note the faith based criteria is only for 50% of places unlike St Wilfrids and St Bedes and other faith schools. This is clearly mentioned in the TIBHS admissions policy.[/p][/quote]We should remove ALL religion from schools so you can drop the 'St Wilfrids do it so why can't we argument'. Why are you linking charity and community integration together? They are not really the same if the charities Tauheedul contribute to are based in Pakistan or are used by Asian heritage people. This therefore justifies my lip service comment as the Tauheedul pupils will still not mix with other kids and live parallel lives.[/p][/quote]Jack I very much doubt anyone will listen to you. When this schools opens, it will be heavily oversubscribed. As for your charity point, do you know that East Lancashire Hospice also serves non-Muslims and so does Cancer Research. bmurtaja
  • Score: 0

5:26pm Sat 7 Apr 12

bmurtaja says...

jack daniels wrote:
StephenDes wrote:
It was only a matter of time before Mr. Daniels jumped on his old, now rather tired hobby horse of attempting to justify prejudice - because that's what it is - with some even more tired cliches. So Tauheedul somehow 'cherry picks' its pupils. This is not the case; the admissions code is not different to any other faith school, and is based on mosque membership, amongst other things. At a Catholic school it would be church membership. The school's catchment area encompasses some of the poorer parts of Blackburn; in what way is this 'cherry picking'? Selecting the least advantaged perhaps?
To the correspondent who is advocating opposition to ...'those who don't speak English', I'm not really sure what he's suggesting here. I think that Tauheedul scored 100% A* - C in English Language last year, so obviously he doesn't mean them. We should also be careful when we use words like 'oppose...'; people might get the wrong idea, imagine a Muslim saying that...
Jack continues to be concerned about young Muslims who will '... not interact with a Westerner'. That would be a worry, if it were true. I think it's reasonable to expect interaction from people who respect you and your beliefs, it's rather hard to interact with some-one who believes that your faith in barbaric, you cannot speak English, and that you wish to play no part in wider British society. It takes two to interact Jack.
I may be old and tired but I still type the truth. It's rather uplifting because I can't recall communicating with you so I must be getting famous!!

I have tried this 'it takes two to interact' and it really does not work.

If all I do is point out how wrong this kind of school is, then I've done a good thing.
Not sure about your age bit you definitely do not type the truth.

You say you have tried. Have you ever visited Tauheedul?
[quote][p][bold]jack daniels[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]StephenDes[/bold] wrote: It was only a matter of time before Mr. Daniels jumped on his old, now rather tired hobby horse of attempting to justify prejudice - because that's what it is - with some even more tired cliches. So Tauheedul [and that's how you spell it Jack, pay attention at the back!] somehow 'cherry picks' its pupils. This is not the case; the admissions code is not different to any other faith school, and is based on mosque membership, amongst other things. At a Catholic school it would be church membership. The school's catchment area encompasses some of the poorer parts of Blackburn; in what way is this 'cherry picking'? Selecting the least advantaged perhaps? To the correspondent ['bnp fan' - who clearly uses the same spell check as Jack - 'muzlims?!?!?!'] who is advocating opposition to ...'those who don't speak English', I'm not really sure what he's suggesting here. I think that Tauheedul scored 100% A* - C in English Language last year, so obviously he doesn't mean them. We should also be careful when we use words like 'oppose...'; people might get the wrong idea, imagine a Muslim saying that... Jack continues to be concerned about young Muslims who will '... not interact with a Westerner'. That would be a worry, if it were true. I think it's reasonable to expect interaction from people who respect you and your beliefs, it's rather hard to interact with some-one who believes that your faith in barbaric, you cannot speak English, and that you wish to play no part in wider British society. It takes two to interact Jack.[/p][/quote]I may be old and tired but I still type the truth. It's rather uplifting because I can't recall communicating with you so I must be getting famous!! I have tried this 'it takes two to interact' and it really does not work. If all I do is point out how wrong this kind of school is, then I've done a good thing.[/p][/quote]Not sure about your age bit you definitely do not type the truth. You say you have tried. Have you ever visited Tauheedul? bmurtaja
  • Score: 0

5:29pm Sat 7 Apr 12

living the end times in BB1 says...

Q:How does a Muslim bloke get his misses pregnant..?
Q:How does a Muslim bloke get his misses pregnant..? living the end times in BB1
  • Score: 0

5:33pm Sat 7 Apr 12

DGower says...

Abdul Qadir Qadiri wrote:
If you are concerned like me about the consequences this school will have (if approved) like the worsening of segregation in the town and worse the please sign this petition to highlight your concern. Maybe we can make a difference!!! http://www.change.or g/petitions/departme nt-of-education-to-r efuse-the-applicatio n-for-the-olive-free -primary-school-blac kburn
Abdul,

You talk about the "consequences" and other "worse" things this school will have. Other than the "segregation" issue, what else do you have to tell me before I decide whether or not to sign your petition, which, at present, isn't endearing me to sign up to it. Here is your opportunity to change my mind with your strong case. Go ahead...............
...
[quote][p][bold]Abdul Qadir Qadiri[/bold] wrote: If you are concerned like me about the consequences this school will have (if approved) like the worsening of segregation in the town and worse the please sign this petition to highlight your concern. Maybe we can make a difference!!! http://www.change.or g/petitions/departme nt-of-education-to-r efuse-the-applicatio n-for-the-olive-free -primary-school-blac kburn[/p][/quote]Abdul, You talk about the "consequences" and other "worse" things this school will have. Other than the "segregation" issue, what else do you have to tell me before I decide whether or not to sign your petition, which, at present, isn't endearing me to sign up to it. Here is your opportunity to change my mind with your strong case. Go ahead............... ... DGower
  • Score: 0

5:35pm Sat 7 Apr 12

StephenDes says...

I am pleased to hear Jack that you have 'tried' to interact. It's just that when you comment on any topic when there is even the remotest connection to the Asian/Muslim community in Blackburn, you always seem to take the most bigoted stance possible. You go out of your way to mock people and belittle their culture, and fail to see that in spite of all the real challenges of living in a multicultural country, many of us manage to find common ground and work closely together, respect our differences, and get on with the job. I am not blind to how hard this is sometimes, but knocking a group of hard-working teachers, students, and parents by suggesting that they are in some way less British or that they have alien values is cheap, lazy, and just plain ignorant. Try harder Jack, try harder.
I am pleased to hear Jack that you have 'tried' to interact. It's just that when you comment on any topic when there is even the remotest connection to the Asian/Muslim community in Blackburn, you always seem to take the most bigoted stance possible. You go out of your way to mock people and belittle their culture, and fail to see that in spite of all the real challenges of living in a multicultural country, many of us manage to find common ground and work closely together, respect our differences, and get on with the job. I am not blind to how hard this is sometimes, but knocking a group of hard-working teachers, students, and parents by suggesting that they are in some way less British or that they have alien values is cheap, lazy, and just plain ignorant. Try harder Jack, try harder. StephenDes
  • Score: 0

5:43pm Sat 7 Apr 12

bnp_fan says...

why dont you join me jack to open evening

this petition i think is worthless

this abdul guy will not get any support
why dont you join me jack to open evening this petition i think is worthless this abdul guy will not get any support bnp_fan
  • Score: 0

5:46pm Sat 7 Apr 12

editor1988 says...

StephenDes wrote:
I am pleased to hear Jack that you have 'tried' to interact. It's just that when you comment on any topic when there is even the remotest connection to the Asian/Muslim community in Blackburn, you always seem to take the most bigoted stance possible. You go out of your way to mock people and belittle their culture, and fail to see that in spite of all the real challenges of living in a multicultural country, many of us manage to find common ground and work closely together, respect our differences, and get on with the job. I am not blind to how hard this is sometimes, but knocking a group of hard-working teachers, students, and parents by suggesting that they are in some way less British or that they have alien values is cheap, lazy, and just plain ignorant. Try harder Jack, try harder.
Agree.

As someone mentioned, I think Jack you should go to Tauheedul. If you make this visit, you will be better informed.
[quote][p][bold]StephenDes[/bold] wrote: I am pleased to hear Jack that you have 'tried' to interact. It's just that when you comment on any topic when there is even the remotest connection to the Asian/Muslim community in Blackburn, you always seem to take the most bigoted stance possible. You go out of your way to mock people and belittle their culture, and fail to see that in spite of all the real challenges of living in a multicultural country, many of us manage to find common ground and work closely together, respect our differences, and get on with the job. I am not blind to how hard this is sometimes, but knocking a group of hard-working teachers, students, and parents by suggesting that they are in some way less British or that they have alien values is cheap, lazy, and just plain ignorant. Try harder Jack, try harder.[/p][/quote]Agree. As someone mentioned, I think Jack you should go to Tauheedul. If you make this visit, you will be better informed. editor1988
  • Score: 0

5:54pm Sat 7 Apr 12

bnp_fan says...

the more i read about these muzlims, i think i need to meet them

they seem like guys who are interested in educating children

their blakewater work is good with results getting better

maybe if they open this school, it is good for blackburn

at least we will have more jobs in blackburn
the more i read about these muzlims, i think i need to meet them they seem like guys who are interested in educating children their blakewater work is good with results getting better maybe if they open this school, it is good for blackburn at least we will have more jobs in blackburn bnp_fan
  • Score: 0

5:57pm Sat 7 Apr 12

sallythomson says...

DGower wrote:
"Stragetic planning" from educations bosses?! Don't make me laugh Councillor Bateson. When you look at the debacle of BSF, the blind financial support of Queens Park / Blakewater / Blackburn Central, the loss of Darwen Moorland as an Academy from the fold, the loss of St Wilfrids as an Academy from the fold, redundancies, school closures, a new boys' school opening under your noses and now a proposal for a Primary school.............. ... BwDBC have done many things Councillor Bateson but stratgeic planning is definitely not one of them.
There is no leadership at the Council. Never mind, strategic planning - the whole school system in the borough is a mess. All the best to these guys and to any one else who wants to improve the quality of provision in the town.
[quote][p][bold]DGower[/bold] wrote: "Stragetic planning" from educations bosses?! Don't make me laugh Councillor Bateson. When you look at the debacle of BSF, the blind financial support of Queens Park / Blakewater / Blackburn Central, the loss of Darwen Moorland as an Academy from the fold, the loss of St Wilfrids as an Academy from the fold, redundancies, school closures, a new boys' school opening under your noses and now a proposal for a Primary school.............. ... BwDBC have done many things Councillor Bateson but stratgeic planning is definitely not one of them.[/p][/quote]There is no leadership at the Council. Never mind, strategic planning - the whole school system in the borough is a mess. All the best to these guys and to any one else who wants to improve the quality of provision in the town. sallythomson
  • Score: 0

6:03pm Sat 7 Apr 12

sallythomson says...

gutterpress wrote:
Well, come on Jake Berry, have you any comment to make on this? Multiculturalism? Integration? Or do you only have opinions on things that don't rock the boat? A Cameron puppet.
This is nothing to do with multi culturalism. I am not a fan of the conservatives - but they are trying to sort labour's mess.... For several years standards in the borough's primary schools have been falling. Unless this is addressed as a matter of urgency we will continue to see these type of new schools being established.
[quote][p][bold]gutterpress[/bold] wrote: Well, come on Jake Berry, have you any comment to make on this? Multiculturalism? Integration? Or do you only have opinions on things that don't rock the boat? A Cameron puppet.[/p][/quote]This is nothing to do with multi culturalism. I am not a fan of the conservatives - but they are trying to sort labour's mess.... For several years standards in the borough's primary schools have been falling. Unless this is addressed as a matter of urgency we will continue to see these type of new schools being established. sallythomson
  • Score: 0

6:04pm Sat 7 Apr 12

editor1988 says...

sallythomson wrote:
DGower wrote: "Stragetic planning" from educations bosses?! Don't make me laugh Councillor Bateson. When you look at the debacle of BSF, the blind financial support of Queens Park / Blakewater / Blackburn Central, the loss of Darwen Moorland as an Academy from the fold, the loss of St Wilfrids as an Academy from the fold, redundancies, school closures, a new boys' school opening under your noses and now a proposal for a Primary school.............. ... BwDBC have done many things Councillor Bateson but stratgeic planning is definitely not one of them.
There is no leadership at the Council. Never mind, strategic planning - the whole school system in the borough is a mess. All the best to these guys and to any one else who wants to improve the quality of provision in the town.
Some people including the Cllr Bateson wants this mess to continue because schools like Tauheedul expose the failure of the council and people like Maureen Bateson.

Any objective person will conclude Blackbburn needs Tauheedul schools, not one or two, but to takeover other schools like Blakewater and improve the standards in the town.

Despite Tauheedul's results and achievements, Blackburn schools are rated as one of the worst in the country. What does that say about the leadership of the council and Maureen Bateson?
[quote][p][bold]sallythomson[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]DGower[/bold] wrote: "Stragetic planning" from educations bosses?! Don't make me laugh Councillor Bateson. When you look at the debacle of BSF, the blind financial support of Queens Park / Blakewater / Blackburn Central, the loss of Darwen Moorland as an Academy from the fold, the loss of St Wilfrids as an Academy from the fold, redundancies, school closures, a new boys' school opening under your noses and now a proposal for a Primary school.............. ... BwDBC have done many things Councillor Bateson but stratgeic planning is definitely not one of them.[/p][/quote]There is no leadership at the Council. Never mind, strategic planning - the whole school system in the borough is a mess. All the best to these guys and to any one else who wants to improve the quality of provision in the town.[/p][/quote]Some people including the Cllr Bateson wants this mess to continue because schools like Tauheedul expose the failure of the council and people like Maureen Bateson. Any objective person will conclude Blackbburn needs Tauheedul schools, not one or two, but to takeover other schools like Blakewater and improve the standards in the town. Despite Tauheedul's results and achievements, Blackburn schools are rated as one of the worst in the country. What does that say about the leadership of the council and Maureen Bateson? editor1988
  • Score: 0

6:06pm Sat 7 Apr 12

editor1988 says...

sallythomson wrote:
gutterpress wrote: Well, come on Jake Berry, have you any comment to make on this? Multiculturalism? Integration? Or do you only have opinions on things that don't rock the boat? A Cameron puppet.
This is nothing to do with multi culturalism. I am not a fan of the conservatives - but they are trying to sort labour's mess.... For several years standards in the borough's primary schools have been falling. Unless this is addressed as a matter of urgency we will continue to see these type of new schools being established.
By the way, Labour's education architect Lord Adonis also supports Free Schools. Only Cllr Bateson cannot see it.

Standards have been decreasing for several decades, not several years.
[quote][p][bold]sallythomson[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]gutterpress[/bold] wrote: Well, come on Jake Berry, have you any comment to make on this? Multiculturalism? Integration? Or do you only have opinions on things that don't rock the boat? A Cameron puppet.[/p][/quote]This is nothing to do with multi culturalism. I am not a fan of the conservatives - but they are trying to sort labour's mess.... For several years standards in the borough's primary schools have been falling. Unless this is addressed as a matter of urgency we will continue to see these type of new schools being established.[/p][/quote]By the way, Labour's education architect Lord Adonis also supports Free Schools. Only Cllr Bateson cannot see it. Standards have been decreasing for several decades, not several years. editor1988
  • Score: 0

6:17pm Sat 7 Apr 12

DGower says...

Today I read that over 50% of secondary schools are now academies. With the academy expansion set to continue, are we seeing the demise of the Local Authority and their role in organising education provision? I sure hope so, so that we don't need to listen to the claptrap from the likes of Cllr Bateson.
Today I read that over 50% of secondary schools are now academies. With the academy expansion set to continue, are we seeing the demise of the Local Authority and their role in organising education provision? I sure hope so, so that we don't need to listen to the claptrap from the likes of Cllr Bateson. DGower
  • Score: 0

6:19pm Sat 7 Apr 12

bmurtaja says...

Free schools could save British education, and Andrew Adonis knows it
http://blogs.telegra
ph.co.uk/news/drmart
instephen/100144184/
education-isnt-worki
ng-and-andrew-adonis
-knows-it-when-will-
the-labour-party-bac
k-him/

editor 1988 is right. This is an interesting article by a Headteacher (yes, he is not a Muslim)
Free schools could save British education, and Andrew Adonis knows it http://blogs.telegra ph.co.uk/news/drmart instephen/100144184/ education-isnt-worki ng-and-andrew-adonis -knows-it-when-will- the-labour-party-bac k-him/ editor 1988 is right. This is an interesting article by a Headteacher (yes, he is not a Muslim) bmurtaja
  • Score: 0

6:22pm Sat 7 Apr 12

editor1988 says...

DGower wrote:
Today I read that over 50% of secondary schools are now academies. With the academy expansion set to continue, are we seeing the demise of the Local Authority and their role in organising education provision? I sure hope so, so that we don't need to listen to the claptrap from the likes of Cllr Bateson.
You have hit the nail on the head.

This is exactly why Cllr Bateson opposes Free Schools and Academies. She will have no position in the council. I think St Wilfrids has become an academy and is no longer under their control so it will do much better now.

I hope all other schools become academies quick.

Who would want Bateson as their head?
[quote][p][bold]DGower[/bold] wrote: Today I read that over 50% of secondary schools are now academies. With the academy expansion set to continue, are we seeing the demise of the Local Authority and their role in organising education provision? I sure hope so, so that we don't need to listen to the claptrap from the likes of Cllr Bateson.[/p][/quote]You have hit the nail on the head. This is exactly why Cllr Bateson opposes Free Schools and Academies. She will have no position in the council. I think St Wilfrids has become an academy and is no longer under their control so it will do much better now. I hope all other schools become academies quick. Who would want Bateson as their head? editor1988
  • Score: 0

6:24pm Sat 7 Apr 12

coolguy says...

jack daniels wrote:
As quoted from the official Tuheedal addmissions school policy.

"It is conducted as an Islamic school in accordance with the teachings of the Deobandi Hanafi Tablighi school of
thought. As such, the school’s Admission Policy provides for entry for all female students, with preference given to those families who adhere to the Deobandi Hanafi Tablighi teachings of the Islamic faith and who are part of

the communities served by Masjid-e-Tauheedul Islam, Masjidal Hidayah, Masjid-e-Irfan and Masjid-e-Anisul Islam."

Also -

"Oversubscription Criteria, listed below in order of priority:

1. Looked after girls (girls in public care) of the Muslim faith.

2. Girls whose parents are members of, or women who receive the membership benefits of, Masjid-e-

Tauheedul Islam.¹

3. Girls whose parents are members of, or women who receive the membership benefits of, Masjid al

Hidayah, Masjid-e-Irfan and Masjid-e-Anisul Islam.¹"

So, lets be honest, this is far from integration. It's keeping one set of people from another. It's ensuring these muslim girls don't come into contact with us non-believers. We will have children from the asian community, living in a western country, who will not interact with a westerner.
Looks like Jack Daniels has had a good few Jack Daniels to drink as his assesment is just baseless, rather than accusing tauheedul of segregation his assesment is openly creating segregation, Jack Daneils by name Jack Daniels by nature
[quote][p][bold]jack daniels[/bold] wrote: As quoted from the official Tuheedal addmissions school policy. "It is conducted as an Islamic school in accordance with the teachings of the Deobandi Hanafi Tablighi school of thought. As such, the school’s Admission Policy provides for entry for all female students, with preference given to those families who adhere to the Deobandi Hanafi Tablighi teachings of the Islamic faith and who are part of the communities served by Masjid-e-Tauheedul Islam, Masjidal Hidayah, Masjid-e-Irfan and Masjid-e-Anisul Islam." Also - "Oversubscription Criteria, listed below in order of priority: 1. Looked after girls (girls in public care) of the Muslim faith. 2. Girls whose parents are members of, or women who receive the membership benefits of, Masjid-e- Tauheedul Islam.¹ 3. Girls whose parents are members of, or women who receive the membership benefits of, Masjid al Hidayah, Masjid-e-Irfan and Masjid-e-Anisul Islam.¹" So, lets be honest, this is far from integration. It's keeping one set of people from another. It's ensuring these muslim girls don't come into contact with us non-believers. We will have children from the asian community, living in a western country, who will not interact with a westerner.[/p][/quote]Looks like Jack Daniels has had a good few Jack Daniels to drink as his assesment is just baseless, rather than accusing tauheedul of segregation his assesment is openly creating segregation, Jack Daneils by name Jack Daniels by nature coolguy
  • Score: 0

6:37pm Sat 7 Apr 12

coolguy says...

editor1988 wrote:
sallythomson wrote:
DGower wrote: "Stragetic planning" from educations bosses?! Don't make me laugh Councillor Bateson. When you look at the debacle of BSF, the blind financial support of Queens Park / Blakewater / Blackburn Central, the loss of Darwen Moorland as an Academy from the fold, the loss of St Wilfrids as an Academy from the fold, redundancies, school closures, a new boys' school opening under your noses and now a proposal for a Primary school.............. ... BwDBC have done many things Councillor Bateson but stratgeic planning is definitely not one of them.
There is no leadership at the Council. Never mind, strategic planning - the whole school system in the borough is a mess. All the best to these guys and to any one else who wants to improve the quality of provision in the town.
Some people including the Cllr Bateson wants this mess to continue because schools like Tauheedul expose the failure of the council and people like Maureen Bateson.

Any objective person will conclude Blackbburn needs Tauheedul schools, not one or two, but to takeover other schools like Blakewater and improve the standards in the town.

Despite Tauheedul's results and achievements, Blackburn schools are rated as one of the worst in the country. What does that say about the leadership of the council and Maureen Bateson?
totally agree infact i would urge Tauheedul to open a nursery and show Maureen Bateson how a nursery should be run. My daughter has just left nursery and based on what other mid performing nursery teachers have said to me is worrying for my daughters education. Come on Tauheedul you are doing well continue with the great work that you are doing and dont let people on here with negative comments or people like Maureen Bateson be a barrier for you to strive for excellent education system that you have already implemented at TIGHS and your future ambitions
[quote][p][bold]editor1988[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]sallythomson[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]DGower[/bold] wrote: "Stragetic planning" from educations bosses?! Don't make me laugh Councillor Bateson. When you look at the debacle of BSF, the blind financial support of Queens Park / Blakewater / Blackburn Central, the loss of Darwen Moorland as an Academy from the fold, the loss of St Wilfrids as an Academy from the fold, redundancies, school closures, a new boys' school opening under your noses and now a proposal for a Primary school.............. ... BwDBC have done many things Councillor Bateson but stratgeic planning is definitely not one of them.[/p][/quote]There is no leadership at the Council. Never mind, strategic planning - the whole school system in the borough is a mess. All the best to these guys and to any one else who wants to improve the quality of provision in the town.[/p][/quote]Some people including the Cllr Bateson wants this mess to continue because schools like Tauheedul expose the failure of the council and people like Maureen Bateson. Any objective person will conclude Blackbburn needs Tauheedul schools, not one or two, but to takeover other schools like Blakewater and improve the standards in the town. Despite Tauheedul's results and achievements, Blackburn schools are rated as one of the worst in the country. What does that say about the leadership of the council and Maureen Bateson?[/p][/quote]totally agree infact i would urge Tauheedul to open a nursery and show Maureen Bateson how a nursery should be run. My daughter has just left nursery and based on what other mid performing nursery teachers have said to me is worrying for my daughters education. Come on Tauheedul you are doing well continue with the great work that you are doing and dont let people on here with negative comments or people like Maureen Bateson be a barrier for you to strive for excellent education system that you have already implemented at TIGHS and your future ambitions coolguy
  • Score: 0

6:40pm Sat 7 Apr 12

coolguy says...

Abdul Qadir Qadiri wrote:
If you are concerned like me about the consequences this school will have (if approved) like the worsening of segregation in the town and worse the please sign this petition to highlight your concern. Maybe we can make a difference!!!
http://www.change.or

g/petitions/departme

nt-of-education-to-r

efuse-the-applicatio

n-for-the-olive-free

-primary-school-blac

kburn
Abdul if your worried about segregation well let me tell you one thing if my children can come home with results like Tauheedul have achieved with their pass rates i would choose segregation over integration anyday
[quote][p][bold]Abdul Qadir Qadiri[/bold] wrote: If you are concerned like me about the consequences this school will have (if approved) like the worsening of segregation in the town and worse the please sign this petition to highlight your concern. Maybe we can make a difference!!! http://www.change.or g/petitions/departme nt-of-education-to-r efuse-the-applicatio n-for-the-olive-free -primary-school-blac kburn[/p][/quote]Abdul if your worried about segregation well let me tell you one thing if my children can come home with results like Tauheedul have achieved with their pass rates i would choose segregation over integration anyday coolguy
  • Score: 0

6:41pm Sat 7 Apr 12

coolguy says...

Abdul Qadir Qadiri wrote:
If you are concerned like me about the consequences this school will have (if approved) like the worsening of segregation in the town and worse the please sign this petition to highlight your concern. Maybe we can make a difference!!!
http://www.change.or

g/petitions/departme

nt-of-education-to-r

efuse-the-applicatio

n-for-the-olive-free

-primary-school-blac

kburn
Abdul if your worried about segregation well let me tell you one thing if my children can come home with results like Tauheedul have achieved with their pass rates i would choose segregation over integration anyday
[quote][p][bold]Abdul Qadir Qadiri[/bold] wrote: If you are concerned like me about the consequences this school will have (if approved) like the worsening of segregation in the town and worse the please sign this petition to highlight your concern. Maybe we can make a difference!!! http://www.change.or g/petitions/departme nt-of-education-to-r efuse-the-applicatio n-for-the-olive-free -primary-school-blac kburn[/p][/quote]Abdul if your worried about segregation well let me tell you one thing if my children can come home with results like Tauheedul have achieved with their pass rates i would choose segregation over integration anyday coolguy
  • Score: 0

6:43pm Sat 7 Apr 12

bmurtaja says...

coolguy wrote:
editor1988 wrote:
sallythomson wrote:
DGower wrote: "Stragetic planning" from educations bosses?! Don't make me laugh Councillor Bateson. When you look at the debacle of BSF, the blind financial support of Queens Park / Blakewater / Blackburn Central, the loss of Darwen Moorland as an Academy from the fold, the loss of St Wilfrids as an Academy from the fold, redundancies, school closures, a new boys' school opening under your noses and now a proposal for a Primary school.............. ... BwDBC have done many things Councillor Bateson but stratgeic planning is definitely not one of them.
There is no leadership at the Council. Never mind, strategic planning - the whole school system in the borough is a mess. All the best to these guys and to any one else who wants to improve the quality of provision in the town.
Some people including the Cllr Bateson wants this mess to continue because schools like Tauheedul expose the failure of the council and people like Maureen Bateson.

Any objective person will conclude Blackbburn needs Tauheedul schools, not one or two, but to takeover other schools like Blakewater and improve the standards in the town.

Despite Tauheedul's results and achievements, Blackburn schools are rated as one of the worst in the country. What does that say about the leadership of the council and Maureen Bateson?
totally agree infact i would urge Tauheedul to open a nursery and show Maureen Bateson how a nursery should be run. My daughter has just left nursery and based on what other mid performing nursery teachers have said to me is worrying for my daughters education. Come on Tauheedul you are doing well continue with the great work that you are doing and dont let people on here with negative comments or people like Maureen Bateson be a barrier for you to strive for excellent education system that you have already implemented at TIGHS and your future ambitions
Totally agree. Tauheedul should open a few nurseries and a few more schools so everyone can benefit. I can appreciate some parents disappointment when they do not get admission at Tauheedul. The solution is to have more schools and support such proposals.

I would also add that Tauheedul should also look at college provision because Blackburn College does not provide a good quality education. How many students from Blackburn College get entry into a good university?
[quote][p][bold]coolguy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]editor1988[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]sallythomson[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]DGower[/bold] wrote: "Stragetic planning" from educations bosses?! Don't make me laugh Councillor Bateson. When you look at the debacle of BSF, the blind financial support of Queens Park / Blakewater / Blackburn Central, the loss of Darwen Moorland as an Academy from the fold, the loss of St Wilfrids as an Academy from the fold, redundancies, school closures, a new boys' school opening under your noses and now a proposal for a Primary school.............. ... BwDBC have done many things Councillor Bateson but stratgeic planning is definitely not one of them.[/p][/quote]There is no leadership at the Council. Never mind, strategic planning - the whole school system in the borough is a mess. All the best to these guys and to any one else who wants to improve the quality of provision in the town.[/p][/quote]Some people including the Cllr Bateson wants this mess to continue because schools like Tauheedul expose the failure of the council and people like Maureen Bateson. Any objective person will conclude Blackbburn needs Tauheedul schools, not one or two, but to takeover other schools like Blakewater and improve the standards in the town. Despite Tauheedul's results and achievements, Blackburn schools are rated as one of the worst in the country. What does that say about the leadership of the council and Maureen Bateson?[/p][/quote]totally agree infact i would urge Tauheedul to open a nursery and show Maureen Bateson how a nursery should be run. My daughter has just left nursery and based on what other mid performing nursery teachers have said to me is worrying for my daughters education. Come on Tauheedul you are doing well continue with the great work that you are doing and dont let people on here with negative comments or people like Maureen Bateson be a barrier for you to strive for excellent education system that you have already implemented at TIGHS and your future ambitions[/p][/quote]Totally agree. Tauheedul should open a few nurseries and a few more schools so everyone can benefit. I can appreciate some parents disappointment when they do not get admission at Tauheedul. The solution is to have more schools and support such proposals. I would also add that Tauheedul should also look at college provision because Blackburn College does not provide a good quality education. How many students from Blackburn College get entry into a good university? bmurtaja
  • Score: 0

6:48pm Sat 7 Apr 12

bmurtaja says...

From the website.

The hallmark of all of our Tauheedul Free Schools is:

Outstanding academic achievement and attainment by learners of all backgrounds.
High-powered academic curriculum.
A rich and challenging extra-curricular and enrichment programme.
A culture of high expectations with ambitious targets for all our young people and staff.
Outstanding efficiency, accountability and transparency.
A passionate focus on character development, moral intelligence and self-discipline.
A commitment to personal development, community service and charitable giving.
From the website. The hallmark of all of our Tauheedul Free Schools is: Outstanding academic achievement and attainment by learners of all backgrounds. High-powered academic curriculum. A rich and challenging extra-curricular and enrichment programme. A culture of high expectations with ambitious targets for all our young people and staff. Outstanding efficiency, accountability and transparency. A passionate focus on character development, moral intelligence and self-discipline. A commitment to personal development, community service and charitable giving. bmurtaja
  • Score: 0

8:32pm Sat 7 Apr 12

Stanley fan says...

Come on Bburn - accy boys would be delighted to have a school like this - your primary schools (and secondary schools for that matter) are pretty ordinary. Tauheedul is your one decent school and they want to help improve standards in primary as well. You should be welcoming them with open arms and your fire should be aimed at the Council for letting so many kids down for so long.
The right wing loonies are having their usual mindless moan with complete disregard for the facts - this school has outperformed the rest of schools in BB and in the Northwest for years. Now they will do the same for primary aged children. Tauheedul - please come to accy - you will be very welcome.
Come on Bburn - accy boys would be delighted to have a school like this - your primary schools (and secondary schools for that matter) are pretty ordinary. Tauheedul is your one decent school and they want to help improve standards in primary as well. You should be welcoming them with open arms and your fire should be aimed at the Council for letting so many kids down for so long. The right wing loonies are having their usual mindless moan with complete disregard for the facts - this school has outperformed the rest of schools in BB and in the Northwest for years. Now they will do the same for primary aged children. Tauheedul - please come to accy - you will be very welcome. Stanley fan
  • Score: 0

10:54pm Sat 7 Apr 12

jack daniels says...

coolguy wrote:
jack daniels wrote:
As quoted from the official Tuheedal addmissions school policy.

"It is conducted as an Islamic school in accordance with the teachings of the Deobandi Hanafi Tablighi school of
thought. As such, the school’s Admission Policy provides for entry for all female students, with preference given to those families who adhere to the Deobandi Hanafi Tablighi teachings of the Islamic faith and who are part of

the communities served by Masjid-e-Tauheedul Islam, Masjidal Hidayah, Masjid-e-Irfan and Masjid-e-Anisul Islam."

Also -

"Oversubscription Criteria, listed below in order of priority:

1. Looked after girls (girls in public care) of the Muslim faith.

2. Girls whose parents are members of, or women who receive the membership benefits of, Masjid-e-

Tauheedul Islam.¹

3. Girls whose parents are members of, or women who receive the membership benefits of, Masjid al

Hidayah, Masjid-e-Irfan and Masjid-e-Anisul Islam.¹"

So, lets be honest, this is far from integration. It's keeping one set of people from another. It's ensuring these muslim girls don't come into contact with us non-believers. We will have children from the asian community, living in a western country, who will not interact with a westerner.
Looks like Jack Daniels has had a good few Jack Daniels to drink as his assesment is just baseless, rather than accusing tauheedul of segregation his assesment is openly creating segregation, Jack Daneils by name Jack Daniels by nature
Cheap insults the best you can do?
[quote][p][bold]coolguy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]jack daniels[/bold] wrote: As quoted from the official Tuheedal addmissions school policy. "It is conducted as an Islamic school in accordance with the teachings of the Deobandi Hanafi Tablighi school of thought. As such, the school’s Admission Policy provides for entry for all female students, with preference given to those families who adhere to the Deobandi Hanafi Tablighi teachings of the Islamic faith and who are part of the communities served by Masjid-e-Tauheedul Islam, Masjidal Hidayah, Masjid-e-Irfan and Masjid-e-Anisul Islam." Also - "Oversubscription Criteria, listed below in order of priority: 1. Looked after girls (girls in public care) of the Muslim faith. 2. Girls whose parents are members of, or women who receive the membership benefits of, Masjid-e- Tauheedul Islam.¹ 3. Girls whose parents are members of, or women who receive the membership benefits of, Masjid al Hidayah, Masjid-e-Irfan and Masjid-e-Anisul Islam.¹" So, lets be honest, this is far from integration. It's keeping one set of people from another. It's ensuring these muslim girls don't come into contact with us non-believers. We will have children from the asian community, living in a western country, who will not interact with a westerner.[/p][/quote]Looks like Jack Daniels has had a good few Jack Daniels to drink as his assesment is just baseless, rather than accusing tauheedul of segregation his assesment is openly creating segregation, Jack Daneils by name Jack Daniels by nature[/p][/quote]Cheap insults the best you can do? jack daniels
  • Score: 0

11:03pm Sat 7 Apr 12

jack daniels says...

StephenDes wrote:
I am pleased to hear Jack that you have 'tried' to interact. It's just that when you comment on any topic when there is even the remotest connection to the Asian/Muslim community in Blackburn, you always seem to take the most bigoted stance possible. You go out of your way to mock people and belittle their culture, and fail to see that in spite of all the real challenges of living in a multicultural country, many of us manage to find common ground and work closely together, respect our differences, and get on with the job. I am not blind to how hard this is sometimes, but knocking a group of hard-working teachers, students, and parents by suggesting that they are in some way less British or that they have alien values is cheap, lazy, and just plain ignorant. Try harder Jack, try harder.
Better a bigot than a brainwashed slave. I've not knocked the hard work of the pupils or teachers, it is you that put them on a pedistal and made them out to be better than the rest of us. I live in a mixed area so stop trying to be a smart **** ste because we both smell the bile coming from your mouth.
[quote][p][bold]StephenDes[/bold] wrote: I am pleased to hear Jack that you have 'tried' to interact. It's just that when you comment on any topic when there is even the remotest connection to the Asian/Muslim community in Blackburn, you always seem to take the most bigoted stance possible. You go out of your way to mock people and belittle their culture, and fail to see that in spite of all the real challenges of living in a multicultural country, many of us manage to find common ground and work closely together, respect our differences, and get on with the job. I am not blind to how hard this is sometimes, but knocking a group of hard-working teachers, students, and parents by suggesting that they are in some way less British or that they have alien values is cheap, lazy, and just plain ignorant. Try harder Jack, try harder.[/p][/quote]Better a bigot than a brainwashed slave. I've not knocked the hard work of the pupils or teachers, it is you that put them on a pedistal and made them out to be better than the rest of us. I live in a mixed area so stop trying to be a smart **** ste because we both smell the bile coming from your mouth. jack daniels
  • Score: 0

11:08pm Sat 7 Apr 12

jack daniels says...

coolguy wrote:
Abdul Qadir Qadiri wrote:
If you are concerned like me about the consequences this school will have (if approved) like the worsening of segregation in the town and worse the please sign this petition to highlight your concern. Maybe we can make a difference!!!
http://www.change.or


g/petitions/departme


nt-of-education-to-r


efuse-the-applicatio


n-for-the-olive-free


-primary-school-blac


kburn
Abdul if your worried about segregation well let me tell you one thing if my children can come home with results like Tauheedul have achieved with their pass rates i would choose segregation over integration anyday
Hey, maybe if you lived in the middle east, where all the mosque funding comes from, your life would be fantastic. ;-)
[quote][p][bold]coolguy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Abdul Qadir Qadiri[/bold] wrote: If you are concerned like me about the consequences this school will have (if approved) like the worsening of segregation in the town and worse the please sign this petition to highlight your concern. Maybe we can make a difference!!! http://www.change.or g/petitions/departme nt-of-education-to-r efuse-the-applicatio n-for-the-olive-free -primary-school-blac kburn[/p][/quote]Abdul if your worried about segregation well let me tell you one thing if my children can come home with results like Tauheedul have achieved with their pass rates i would choose segregation over integration anyday[/p][/quote]Hey, maybe if you lived in the middle east, where all the mosque funding comes from, your life would be fantastic. ;-) jack daniels
  • Score: 0

11:19pm Sat 7 Apr 12

jack daniels says...

StephenDes wrote:
Which foreign country, exactly? In what way 'extremist'? Unless good GCSEs are a new extremist tactic to attack 'Western values'.
Google the visit to the school by the royal family. Google donation to the mosque by same royal family . Google form of Islam from that country and finally if you are patient you can find concern throughout Europe about it. I'd do it for you but I'm out having fun in the local pub.
[quote][p][bold]StephenDes[/bold] wrote: Which foreign country, exactly? In what way 'extremist'? Unless good GCSEs are a new extremist tactic to attack 'Western values'.[/p][/quote]Google the visit to the school by the royal family. Google donation to the mosque by same royal family . Google form of Islam from that country and finally if you are patient you can find concern throughout Europe about it. I'd do it for you but I'm out having fun in the local pub. jack daniels
  • Score: 0

11:24pm Sat 7 Apr 12

living the end times in BB1 says...

living the end times in BB1 wrote:
Q:How does a Muslim bloke get his misses pregnant..?
How does a Muslim bloke get his misses pregnant..?
[quote][p][bold]living the end times in BB1[/bold] wrote: Q:How does a Muslim bloke get his misses pregnant..?[/p][/quote]How does a Muslim bloke get his misses pregnant..? living the end times in BB1
  • Score: 0

11:48pm Sat 7 Apr 12

bmurtaja says...

jack daniels wrote:
StephenDes wrote:
Which foreign country, exactly? In what way 'extremist'? Unless good GCSEs are a new extremist tactic to attack 'Western values'.
Google the visit to the school by the royal family. Google donation to the mosque by same royal family . Google form of Islam from that country and finally if you are patient you can find concern throughout Europe about it. I'd do it for you but I'm out having fun in the local pub.
Jack

You have done this before and got all the answers.

The funding came from Qatar. Qatar is not Saudi Arabia. Check the map. Google it once you return from the pub. Qatar is a liberal Muslim country.

The Duke of Kent also visited the school. Why don't you mention this? Lord Shuttleworth also visited the school recently. Why do you not mention this?

As regards the Princess from Saudi Arabia who visited the school, she has been championing the rights of women and female education for decades. I think Tauheedul was in a privileged position to have hosted her.

So stop spreading these lies.
[quote][p][bold]jack daniels[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]StephenDes[/bold] wrote: Which foreign country, exactly? In what way 'extremist'? Unless good GCSEs are a new extremist tactic to attack 'Western values'.[/p][/quote]Google the visit to the school by the royal family. Google donation to the mosque by same royal family . Google form of Islam from that country and finally if you are patient you can find concern throughout Europe about it. I'd do it for you but I'm out having fun in the local pub.[/p][/quote]Jack You have done this before and got all the answers. The funding came from Qatar. Qatar is not Saudi Arabia. Check the map. Google it once you return from the pub. Qatar is a liberal Muslim country. The Duke of Kent also visited the school. Why don't you mention this? Lord Shuttleworth also visited the school recently. Why do you not mention this? As regards the Princess from Saudi Arabia who visited the school, she has been championing the rights of women and female education for decades. I think Tauheedul was in a privileged position to have hosted her. So stop spreading these lies. bmurtaja
  • Score: 0

11:49pm Sat 7 Apr 12

Lifeinthemix says...

If these schools are 100% transparent then the curriculum needs to be seen and understood by the taxpayer.

With the lord lieutenant and a sitting MP as patron then the school has no basis under which absolute openess on demand is not forthcoming.

I suggest the people of Blackburn send in writing requests for information forthwith so we can see if the banter of the school and those in support of it are sound, not according to jack Straw and the Queens representative in lancashire, but according to the taxpayers idea of what is acceptable. It is not for private enterprise to act outside the taxpayers consent.

Nothing to hide, lets have every little detail and a full list of all pupils in attendance and the portfolios of the parents, an endevour best kept out of the FOI realm as it allows for the denial of personal data under data protection, so make the requests making clear the request is not under FOI and thus the FOI protection for the corporate interests do not apply.
if you all take part in this endevour they will have no choice but to act.

this issue is going to drag and ferment hatred if it is seen to be a secret operation acting on these Isles, and like Arabia, do as we say based in our culteral heritage or the taxpayer demnds you cease forthwith
If these schools are 100% transparent then the curriculum needs to be seen and understood by the taxpayer. With the lord lieutenant and a sitting MP as patron then the school has no basis under which absolute openess on demand is not forthcoming. I suggest the people of Blackburn send in writing requests for information forthwith so we can see if the banter of the school and those in support of it are sound, not according to jack Straw and the Queens representative in lancashire, but according to the taxpayers idea of what is acceptable. It is not for private enterprise to act outside the taxpayers consent. Nothing to hide, lets have every little detail and a full list of all pupils in attendance and the portfolios of the parents, an endevour best kept out of the FOI realm as it allows for the denial of personal data under data protection, so make the requests making clear the request is not under FOI and thus the FOI protection for the corporate interests do not apply. if you all take part in this endevour they will have no choice but to act. this issue is going to drag and ferment hatred if it is seen to be a secret operation acting on these Isles, and like Arabia, do as we say based in our culteral heritage or the taxpayer demnds you cease forthwith Lifeinthemix
  • Score: 0

11:51pm Sat 7 Apr 12

bmurtaja says...

A comment from 2011 on LET:

A Blackburn school is rated Outstanding by Ofsted, gets the best results ever by a secondary school in the area, is rated amongst top 100 schools in the country and is visted by the Duke of Kent and more recently by a Saudi Princess. Its the stuff of dreams and any local area would be proud to have such a school on their patch.
Its remarkable, therefore, to read some of the rabied racism above - what planet are these people on.
We need the honest, decent people of Blackburn to stand up to these bigots - they are an embarrassment to our area. This school is a fantastic success story - we should be singing from the roof tops about the wondeful achievements of their students. This is recognised by our own royal family, by Ofsted abd by a princess from thousands of miles away but apparently not be a small minority on our own doorstep. Maybe they are blinded by hatred, jealousy or plain ignorance.
The Princess is a role model for women all over the world - she could put her feet up and take advantage of her position - instead she works tirelessly for the emancipation of women, for their right to a world class education and their right to be leaders. Its brilliant that she decided to come to this outstanding school.
I say, well done all at tahheedul - you deserve all the parise you get - your students are a credit to you and you are a credit to education and to Blackburn. Keep up the good work.
A comment from 2011 on LET: A Blackburn school is rated Outstanding by Ofsted, gets the best results ever by a secondary school in the area, is rated amongst top 100 schools in the country and is visted by the Duke of Kent and more recently by a Saudi Princess. Its the stuff of dreams and any local area would be proud to have such a school on their patch. Its remarkable, therefore, to read some of the rabied racism above - what planet are these people on. We need the honest, decent people of Blackburn to stand up to these bigots - they are an embarrassment to our area. This school is a fantastic success story - we should be singing from the roof tops about the wondeful achievements of their students. This is recognised by our own royal family, by Ofsted abd by a princess from thousands of miles away but apparently not be a small minority on our own doorstep. Maybe they are blinded by hatred, jealousy or plain ignorance. The Princess is a role model for women all over the world - she could put her feet up and take advantage of her position - instead she works tirelessly for the emancipation of women, for their right to a world class education and their right to be leaders. Its brilliant that she decided to come to this outstanding school. I say, well done all at tahheedul - you deserve all the parise you get - your students are a credit to you and you are a credit to education and to Blackburn. Keep up the good work. bmurtaja
  • Score: 0

11:52pm Sat 7 Apr 12

bmurtaja says...

Another one for Jack ...

Women have graduated from Effat University with which the Princess is most assocated and are now doctors, teachers, nurses, engineers and entrepeneurs.
That's why she visited this particualr school - Ex-students from Tauheedul are also graduating from University and serving our communities - a great success story showing real social mobility at its best. A school that proves with hard work, dedication and commitment you can achieve anything. This school is a model for others to emulate - well done and keep up the good work.
Another one for Jack ... Women have graduated from Effat University with which the Princess is most assocated and are now doctors, teachers, nurses, engineers and entrepeneurs. That's why she visited this particualr school - Ex-students from Tauheedul are also graduating from University and serving our communities - a great success story showing real social mobility at its best. A school that proves with hard work, dedication and commitment you can achieve anything. This school is a model for others to emulate - well done and keep up the good work. bmurtaja
  • Score: 0

11:52pm Sat 7 Apr 12

editor1988 says...

And another one ...

"Empty vessels make most noise"- usually they make a racket! Some of the comments made by these 'green eyed monsters' are just laughable and motivated by none other than hatred, jealousy,prejudice and, most importantly, ignorance. Coming to a judgement just because 'so and so says so' or because 'the school is a 'Muslim' school', or because ' I think that ......', without knowing the reality and the truth, is just diabolical. If you wish to know anything, then ask the right people - those who have dealt with the school or who know the school. When you get the answers, look at them with a fair mind and I am confident many of the misconceptions and prejudices will disappear. If one wears yellow sunglasses, everything they see will seem to be yellow! Take these glasses off and you will see the true colours.! If the LET decide to remove some comments, then hats off to them for that.
And another one ... "Empty vessels make most noise"- usually they make a racket! Some of the comments made by these 'green eyed monsters' are just laughable and motivated by none other than hatred, jealousy,prejudice and, most importantly, ignorance. Coming to a judgement just because 'so and so says so' or because 'the school is a 'Muslim' school', or because ' I think that ......', without knowing the reality and the truth, is just diabolical. If you wish to know anything, then ask the right people - those who have dealt with the school or who know the school. When you get the answers, look at them with a fair mind and I am confident many of the misconceptions and prejudices will disappear. If one wears yellow sunglasses, everything they see will seem to be yellow! Take these glasses off and you will see the true colours.! If the LET decide to remove some comments, then hats off to them for that. editor1988
  • Score: 0

11:55pm Sat 7 Apr 12

bmurtaja says...

Another one for Jack ...

Princess Lulwah the most prominent princess in Saudi Arabia’s royal family visits Tauheedul School. Why is that I wonder? Could it have something to do with the fact the princess is an outstanding champion for women’s education, I think so.

There are very few developments that put this town on the national and international map. Whether people like it or not Tauheedul is the only secondary school in this town that is outstanding, and recently identified as one of the best schools in the country.
The schools fast growing national reputation doesn’t stop there. It has an international reputation for excellence, with many visitors from around the world visiting the school; additionally the outstanding leadership of the school is sought out in terms of advising governments and NGOs internationally.

Rather than attacking it we should be embracing the success of this school as the jewel in our town’s educational crown.
Another one for Jack ... Princess Lulwah the most prominent princess in Saudi Arabia’s royal family visits Tauheedul School. Why is that I wonder? Could it have something to do with the fact the princess is an outstanding champion for women’s education, I think so. There are very few developments that put this town on the national and international map. Whether people like it or not Tauheedul is the only secondary school in this town that is outstanding, and recently identified as one of the best schools in the country. The schools fast growing national reputation doesn’t stop there. It has an international reputation for excellence, with many visitors from around the world visiting the school; additionally the outstanding leadership of the school is sought out in terms of advising governments and NGOs internationally. Rather than attacking it we should be embracing the success of this school as the jewel in our town’s educational crown. bmurtaja
  • Score: 0

11:58pm Sat 7 Apr 12

editor1988 says...

The French Justice Minister (the equivalent of Ken Clarke) has also visited the school. Was she also an extremist?

Back to the story regarding the Primary school, lets all hope it is a success and congratulate Tauheedul for their contribution to Blackburn and the region.

Good luck
The French Justice Minister (the equivalent of Ken Clarke) has also visited the school. Was she also an extremist? Back to the story regarding the Primary school, lets all hope it is a success and congratulate Tauheedul for their contribution to Blackburn and the region. Good luck editor1988
  • Score: 0

11:59pm Sat 7 Apr 12

Lifeinthemix says...

The Duke of Kent is the grandmaster of English freemasonry, freemasonry of course has one aim for this nation....that it moves into a position of such civil unrest that they can shut down under full police contingency powers, all ststutory all against the nations constitution.

This school is a big aspect of that sedition, therefore all involved in this type of agressive abuse of the nations law are not only acting sedition they are in treason, and overtly so.

In Straw and the lord lieutenant it is clear the system will change nothing, it is up to you or nothing will change.

remember we are british, we are tolerant but we are not here to be mocked. Our system is built that we can effect change, but they aim to remove that after civil unrest, so we do not do as the tormentors wish...
use the system our ancestors gave us with their blood so we do not have to shed ours, nor that of the muslims, who are also the victims in this game of the wealthy.
The Duke of Kent is the grandmaster of English freemasonry, freemasonry of course has one aim for this nation....that it moves into a position of such civil unrest that they can shut down under full police contingency powers, all ststutory all against the nations constitution. This school is a big aspect of that sedition, therefore all involved in this type of agressive abuse of the nations law are not only acting sedition they are in treason, and overtly so. In Straw and the lord lieutenant it is clear the system will change nothing, it is up to you or nothing will change. remember we are british, we are tolerant but we are not here to be mocked. Our system is built that we can effect change, but they aim to remove that after civil unrest, so we do not do as the tormentors wish... use the system our ancestors gave us with their blood so we do not have to shed ours, nor that of the muslims, who are also the victims in this game of the wealthy. Lifeinthemix
  • Score: 0

12:00am Sun 8 Apr 12

bmurtaja says...

And this one from a Christian, yes from a Christian ...

As a Christian, I was delighted to be invited to attend the award ceremony for the Class of 2010 from Tauheedul Islam Girls' High School. What a pity that this wonderful event, graced by the presence of an inspirational and hard working Princess has been subject to petty comment. The Princess gave students practical advice that would be relevant to any young person, encouraging them to have big ideas and to nurture their ambitions. The class of 2010 were challenged individually and collectively to work hard to ensure that they will contribute to the present and future well being of this community. Young women in the audience left the presentation full of hope inspired by a gracious Princess who travelled the world to make the students of Tauheedul feel special and to celebrate their outstanding examination success. Blackburn should be proud to be the home of Tauheedul and celebrate with the school and its students the amazing achievements of the Class of 2010. Well done girls!
And this one from a Christian, yes from a Christian ... As a Christian, I was delighted to be invited to attend the award ceremony for the Class of 2010 from Tauheedul Islam Girls' High School. What a pity that this wonderful event, graced by the presence of an inspirational and hard working Princess has been subject to petty comment. The Princess gave students practical advice that would be relevant to any young person, encouraging them to have big ideas and to nurture their ambitions. The class of 2010 were challenged individually and collectively to work hard to ensure that they will contribute to the present and future well being of this community. Young women in the audience left the presentation full of hope inspired by a gracious Princess who travelled the world to make the students of Tauheedul feel special and to celebrate their outstanding examination success. Blackburn should be proud to be the home of Tauheedul and celebrate with the school and its students the amazing achievements of the Class of 2010. Well done girls! bmurtaja
  • Score: 0

12:03am Sun 8 Apr 12

l m h jones says...

editor1988 wrote:
http://www.independe

nt.co.uk/news/educat

ion/education-news/m

uslim-school-helps-o

ut-secular-neighbour

-2129777.html

Critics may disagree with faith schools but read this article and make up your own mind objectively from the comments of the Headteacher of Blakewater.
yes i understand that the ethos of
Tauheedul school has been fantastic in raising aspirations of blakewater what worries me is the whole concept of "free" schools being outside the control of local authorities are we seeing the rise of schools teaching creationism as a valid scientific theory for example?
[quote][p][bold]editor1988[/bold] wrote: http://www.independe nt.co.uk/news/educat ion/education-news/m uslim-school-helps-o ut-secular-neighbour -2129777.html Critics may disagree with faith schools but read this article and make up your own mind objectively from the comments of the Headteacher of Blakewater.[/p][/quote]yes i understand that the ethos of Tauheedul school has been fantastic in raising aspirations of blakewater what worries me is the whole concept of "free" schools being outside the control of local authorities are we seeing the rise of schools teaching creationism as a valid scientific theory for example? l m h jones
  • Score: 0

12:06am Sun 8 Apr 12

Lifeinthemix says...

editor1988 wrote:
And another one ...

"Empty vessels make most noise"- usually they make a racket! Some of the comments made by these 'green eyed monsters' are just laughable and motivated by none other than hatred, jealousy,prejudice and, most importantly, ignorance. Coming to a judgement just because 'so and so says so' or because 'the school is a 'Muslim' school', or because ' I think that ......', without knowing the reality and the truth, is just diabolical. If you wish to know anything, then ask the right people - those who have dealt with the school or who know the school. When you get the answers, look at them with a fair mind and I am confident many of the misconceptions and prejudices will disappear. If one wears yellow sunglasses, everything they see will seem to be yellow! Take these glasses off and you will see the true colours.! If the LET decide to remove some comments, then hats off to them for that.
That is what the jews were encouraged to express in germany, your talk is that of an ignorant idiot who knows nothing of the history of Europe.

You clearly have absolutely no care for peace in this nation, you attract to yourself contempt deservedly.

You know i am sure the main thrust of the cry of the palastinians is that those who came into their lands would stop dictating terms not associated to their customs...they want peace the guests want war.

You appear to be copying the wrong attitude, and if this is a taste of what we can expect to be coming out of this school, then people are correct to express their concern.

the ball is in the court of those pushing this school.
[quote][p][bold]editor1988[/bold] wrote: And another one ... "Empty vessels make most noise"- usually they make a racket! Some of the comments made by these 'green eyed monsters' are just laughable and motivated by none other than hatred, jealousy,prejudice and, most importantly, ignorance. Coming to a judgement just because 'so and so says so' or because 'the school is a 'Muslim' school', or because ' I think that ......', without knowing the reality and the truth, is just diabolical. If you wish to know anything, then ask the right people - those who have dealt with the school or who know the school. When you get the answers, look at them with a fair mind and I am confident many of the misconceptions and prejudices will disappear. If one wears yellow sunglasses, everything they see will seem to be yellow! Take these glasses off and you will see the true colours.! If the LET decide to remove some comments, then hats off to them for that.[/p][/quote]That is what the jews were encouraged to express in germany, your talk is that of an ignorant idiot who knows nothing of the history of Europe. You clearly have absolutely no care for peace in this nation, you attract to yourself contempt deservedly. You know i am sure the main thrust of the cry of the palastinians is that those who came into their lands would stop dictating terms not associated to their customs...they want peace the guests want war. You appear to be copying the wrong attitude, and if this is a taste of what we can expect to be coming out of this school, then people are correct to express their concern. the ball is in the court of those pushing this school. Lifeinthemix
  • Score: 0

12:09am Sun 8 Apr 12

editor1988 says...

Lifeinthemix wrote:
If these schools are 100% transparent then the curriculum needs to be seen and understood by the taxpayer. With the lord lieutenant and a sitting MP as patron then the school has no basis under which absolute openess on demand is not forthcoming. I suggest the people of Blackburn send in writing requests for information forthwith so we can see if the banter of the school and those in support of it are sound, not according to jack Straw and the Queens representative in lancashire, but according to the taxpayers idea of what is acceptable. It is not for private enterprise to act outside the taxpayers consent. Nothing to hide, lets have every little detail and a full list of all pupils in attendance and the portfolios of the parents, an endevour best kept out of the FOI realm as it allows for the denial of personal data under data protection, so make the requests making clear the request is not under FOI and thus the FOI protection for the corporate interests do not apply. if you all take part in this endevour they will have no choice but to act. this issue is going to drag and ferment hatred if it is seen to be a secret operation acting on these Isles, and like Arabia, do as we say based in our culteral heritage or the taxpayer demnds you cease forthwith
Why only ask Tauheedul? Why not request the Catholic and Church of England schools? This anti-Muslim hysteria reflects either ignorance or a deep rooted hatred.

Tauheedul is a VA school. Its subjects and curriculum are no different to other schools in the borough except that girls at the school achieve on average 10As at GCSE.

This information is in the public domain. You do not need any FOI requests. Go on the DfE website and you can find out all you want from the results to the FSM data as well as performance indicators.

St Wilfrids has now become an academy outside of local authority control. Bother asking them what they teach?

The reality is Tauheedul has achieved what no other schools has achieved and some people cannot digest this. A wise man will learn and reflect and a fool will oppose and react, until he becomes a victim of his own opposition.
[quote][p][bold]Lifeinthemix[/bold] wrote: If these schools are 100% transparent then the curriculum needs to be seen and understood by the taxpayer. With the lord lieutenant and a sitting MP as patron then the school has no basis under which absolute openess on demand is not forthcoming. I suggest the people of Blackburn send in writing requests for information forthwith so we can see if the banter of the school and those in support of it are sound, not according to jack Straw and the Queens representative in lancashire, but according to the taxpayers idea of what is acceptable. It is not for private enterprise to act outside the taxpayers consent. Nothing to hide, lets have every little detail and a full list of all pupils in attendance and the portfolios of the parents, an endevour best kept out of the FOI realm as it allows for the denial of personal data under data protection, so make the requests making clear the request is not under FOI and thus the FOI protection for the corporate interests do not apply. if you all take part in this endevour they will have no choice but to act. this issue is going to drag and ferment hatred if it is seen to be a secret operation acting on these Isles, and like Arabia, do as we say based in our culteral heritage or the taxpayer demnds you cease forthwith[/p][/quote]Why only ask Tauheedul? Why not request the Catholic and Church of England schools? This anti-Muslim hysteria reflects either ignorance or a deep rooted hatred. Tauheedul is a VA school. Its subjects and curriculum are no different to other schools in the borough except that girls at the school achieve on average 10As at GCSE. This information is in the public domain. You do not need any FOI requests. Go on the DfE website and you can find out all you want from the results to the FSM data as well as performance indicators. St Wilfrids has now become an academy outside of local authority control. Bother asking them what they teach? The reality is Tauheedul has achieved what no other schools has achieved and some people cannot digest this. A wise man will learn and reflect and a fool will oppose and react, until he becomes a victim of his own opposition. editor1988
  • Score: 0

12:15am Sun 8 Apr 12

Lifeinthemix says...

my god your ignorance knows no bounds.
my god your ignorance knows no bounds. Lifeinthemix
  • Score: 0

12:18am Sun 8 Apr 12

editor1988 says...

l m h jones wrote:
editor1988 wrote: http://www.independe nt.co.uk/news/educat ion/education-news/m uslim-school-helps-o ut-secular-neighbour -2129777.html Critics may disagree with faith schools but read this article and make up your own mind objectively from the comments of the Headteacher of Blakewater.
yes i understand that the ethos of Tauheedul school has been fantastic in raising aspirations of blakewater what worries me is the whole concept of "free" schools being outside the control of local authorities are we seeing the rise of schools teaching creationism as a valid scientific theory for example?
At last the real debate begins.

I appreciate the concern about free schools being outside of local authority control. However, note that:

1. More than half secondary schools in the country has already become academies i.e. outside of local authority control. The government wants all schools to follow suit as it is financially more viable and more beneficial from an educational perspective. Remember free schools are a type of academy. St Wilfrids has become an academy.

2. Local authorities do not really control the curriculum so you could well have a local authority school that teaches creationism (if that is what you fear about free schools)

3. To teach creationism is not allowed and all free school proposers are required to sign a declaration to this effect. If the DfE find out, they can terminate the contract and close the school.

4. The broader debate is what role have local authorities played in managing schools. Take Blackburn as an example. What does the local authority do with the finances it takes from each school's budget? Are our schools improving? Of course parents are not necessarily the solution and the Free School policy has its weaknesses, but where you have organisations like Tauheedul doing what the local authority should have done, then this is surely welcome.
[quote][p][bold]l m h jones[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]editor1988[/bold] wrote: http://www.independe nt.co.uk/news/educat ion/education-news/m uslim-school-helps-o ut-secular-neighbour -2129777.html Critics may disagree with faith schools but read this article and make up your own mind objectively from the comments of the Headteacher of Blakewater.[/p][/quote]yes i understand that the ethos of Tauheedul school has been fantastic in raising aspirations of blakewater what worries me is the whole concept of "free" schools being outside the control of local authorities are we seeing the rise of schools teaching creationism as a valid scientific theory for example?[/p][/quote]At last the real debate begins. I appreciate the concern about free schools being outside of local authority control. However, note that: 1. More than half secondary schools in the country has already become academies i.e. outside of local authority control. The government wants all schools to follow suit as it is financially more viable and more beneficial from an educational perspective. Remember free schools are a type of academy. St Wilfrids has become an academy. 2. Local authorities do not really control the curriculum so you could well have a local authority school that teaches creationism (if that is what you fear about free schools) 3. To teach creationism is not allowed and all free school proposers are required to sign a declaration to this effect. If the DfE find out, they can terminate the contract and close the school. 4. The broader debate is what role have local authorities played in managing schools. Take Blackburn as an example. What does the local authority do with the finances it takes from each school's budget? Are our schools improving? Of course parents are not necessarily the solution and the Free School policy has its weaknesses, but where you have organisations like Tauheedul doing what the local authority should have done, then this is surely welcome. editor1988
  • Score: 0

12:22am Sun 8 Apr 12

bmurtaja says...

Life in the Mix

You seemed to be a very confused person. We are discussing the education of our children and you are referring to free masons and the history of Jewish people, and the Palestinians.

Lets debate the substantial issues.
Life in the Mix You seemed to be a very confused person. We are discussing the education of our children and you are referring to free masons and the history of Jewish people, and the Palestinians. Lets debate the substantial issues. bmurtaja
  • Score: 0

12:22am Sun 8 Apr 12

Stanley fan says...

The primary school will be funded by the government in the same way that Tauheedul is.
The various criticisms and spurious allegations about foreign links are further examples of the way that the mindless xenophobic minority misquote, misrepresent and subvert simple facts.
Tauheedul is an outstanding school and the new primary school will benefit from their knowledge and experience -BB kids deserve the best and they will get that at any school run by these guys.
I haven,t heard anything from the nutters about why BB primary (and secondary) schools are so mediocre and why parents should choose these than choose a school that helps children do so fantastically well.
I hope they diversify even more -we could do with these guys taking over Accy Stanley!
The primary school will be funded by the government in the same way that Tauheedul is. The various criticisms and spurious allegations about foreign links are further examples of the way that the mindless xenophobic minority misquote, misrepresent and subvert simple facts. Tauheedul is an outstanding school and the new primary school will benefit from their knowledge and experience -BB kids deserve the best and they will get that at any school run by these guys. I haven,t heard anything from the nutters about why BB primary (and secondary) schools are so mediocre and why parents should choose these than choose a school that helps children do so fantastically well. I hope they diversify even more -we could do with these guys taking over Accy Stanley! Stanley fan
  • Score: 0

12:24am Sun 8 Apr 12

editor1988 says...

bmurtaja wrote:
Life in the Mix You seemed to be a very confused person. We are discussing the education of our children and you are referring to free masons and the history of Jewish people, and the Palestinians. Lets debate the substantial issues.
Could not agree more.

This is what Tauheedul has done for Blakewater where there are more than 80% white boys and girls. The improvement is unprecedented in its history.

Since the partnership began, there has been a substantial increase in the % of students achieving A*-C.

•In 2009 (before the partnership), 11% of students achieved 5A*-Cs with English and Maths.
•In 2010 (first year of partnership), 26% of students achieved 5A*-Cs with English and Maths.
•In 2011 (second year of partnership), 37% of students achieved 5A*-Cs with English and Maths.
[quote][p][bold]bmurtaja[/bold] wrote: Life in the Mix You seemed to be a very confused person. We are discussing the education of our children and you are referring to free masons and the history of Jewish people, and the Palestinians. Lets debate the substantial issues.[/p][/quote]Could not agree more. This is what Tauheedul has done for Blakewater where there are more than 80% white boys and girls. The improvement is unprecedented in its history. Since the partnership began, there has been a substantial increase in the % of students achieving A*-C. •In 2009 (before the partnership), 11% of students achieved 5A*-Cs with English and Maths. •In 2010 (first year of partnership), 26% of students achieved 5A*-Cs with English and Maths. •In 2011 (second year of partnership), 37% of students achieved 5A*-Cs with English and Maths. editor1988
  • Score: 0

12:25am Sun 8 Apr 12

bmurtaja says...

Stanley fan wrote:
The primary school will be funded by the government in the same way that Tauheedul is.
The various criticisms and spurious allegations about foreign links are further examples of the way that the mindless xenophobic minority misquote, misrepresent and subvert simple facts.
Tauheedul is an outstanding school and the new primary school will benefit from their knowledge and experience -BB kids deserve the best and they will get that at any school run by these guys.
I haven,t heard anything from the nutters about why BB primary (and secondary) schools are so mediocre and why parents should choose these than choose a school that helps children do so fantastically well.
I hope they diversify even more -we could do with these guys taking over Accy Stanley!
Well said Stanley.
[quote][p][bold]Stanley fan[/bold] wrote: The primary school will be funded by the government in the same way that Tauheedul is. The various criticisms and spurious allegations about foreign links are further examples of the way that the mindless xenophobic minority misquote, misrepresent and subvert simple facts. Tauheedul is an outstanding school and the new primary school will benefit from their knowledge and experience -BB kids deserve the best and they will get that at any school run by these guys. I haven,t heard anything from the nutters about why BB primary (and secondary) schools are so mediocre and why parents should choose these than choose a school that helps children do so fantastically well. I hope they diversify even more -we could do with these guys taking over Accy Stanley![/p][/quote]Well said Stanley. bmurtaja
  • Score: 0

1:18am Sun 8 Apr 12

coolguy says...

editor1988 wrote:
bmurtaja wrote:
Life in the Mix You seemed to be a very confused person. We are discussing the education of our children and you are referring to free masons and the history of Jewish people, and the Palestinians. Lets debate the substantial issues.
Could not agree more.

This is what Tauheedul has done for Blakewater where there are more than 80% white boys and girls. The improvement is unprecedented in its history.

Since the partnership began, there has been a substantial increase in the % of students achieving A*-C.

•In 2009 (before the partnership), 11% of students achieved 5A*-Cs with English and Maths.
•In 2010 (first year of partnership), 26% of students achieved 5A*-Cs with English and Maths.
•In 2011 (second year of partnership), 37% of students achieved 5A*-Cs with English and Maths.
absolutly brilliant, results dont lie and that is just a typical example of why Tauheedul needs to be a role model for other state and academies to look up too, a big well done to Mufti Abdul Hamid & co for the work that they are doing, i for one as a parent will be sending my children to schools which are either being supported to by Tauheedul or at Tauheedul
[quote][p][bold]editor1988[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]bmurtaja[/bold] wrote: Life in the Mix You seemed to be a very confused person. We are discussing the education of our children and you are referring to free masons and the history of Jewish people, and the Palestinians. Lets debate the substantial issues.[/p][/quote]Could not agree more. This is what Tauheedul has done for Blakewater where there are more than 80% white boys and girls. The improvement is unprecedented in its history. Since the partnership began, there has been a substantial increase in the % of students achieving A*-C. •In 2009 (before the partnership), 11% of students achieved 5A*-Cs with English and Maths. •In 2010 (first year of partnership), 26% of students achieved 5A*-Cs with English and Maths. •In 2011 (second year of partnership), 37% of students achieved 5A*-Cs with English and Maths.[/p][/quote]absolutly brilliant, results dont lie and that is just a typical example of why Tauheedul needs to be a role model for other state and academies to look up too, a big well done to Mufti Abdul Hamid & co for the work that they are doing, i for one as a parent will be sending my children to schools which are either being supported to by Tauheedul or at Tauheedul coolguy
  • Score: 0

1:30am Sun 8 Apr 12

coolguy says...

bmurtaja wrote:
jack daniels wrote:
StephenDes wrote:
Which foreign country, exactly? In what way 'extremist'? Unless good GCSEs are a new extremist tactic to attack 'Western values'.
Google the visit to the school by the royal family. Google donation to the mosque by same royal family . Google form of Islam from that country and finally if you are patient you can find concern throughout Europe about it. I'd do it for you but I'm out having fun in the local pub.
Jack

You have done this before and got all the answers.

The funding came from Qatar. Qatar is not Saudi Arabia. Check the map. Google it once you return from the pub. Qatar is a liberal Muslim country.

The Duke of Kent also visited the school. Why don't you mention this? Lord Shuttleworth also visited the school recently. Why do you not mention this?

As regards the Princess from Saudi Arabia who visited the school, she has been championing the rights of women and female education for decades. I think Tauheedul was in a privileged position to have hosted her.

So stop spreading these lies.
Jack does it really make a difference where the money has come from, it has come from a legitimate group, if the money came from an illegal group the government would not have approved the boys school, take your racist views where the sun dont shine and keep it there, the school is providing an excellent community service, they are overly subscribed which is why they can pick whom ever they wish, i remember when i was leaving school my first prefence was Our Lady and St Johns RC School and i didnt even get a sniff at being sucessful there, why because they had criterias which i didnt fall under, no one complained then but ofcourse when a succesful muslim school has criterias you bring in your biggoted raicist view of segregation and integration. A school has a criteria which applies to everyone and you have to learn to respect that.
[quote][p][bold]bmurtaja[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]jack daniels[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]StephenDes[/bold] wrote: Which foreign country, exactly? In what way 'extremist'? Unless good GCSEs are a new extremist tactic to attack 'Western values'.[/p][/quote]Google the visit to the school by the royal family. Google donation to the mosque by same royal family . Google form of Islam from that country and finally if you are patient you can find concern throughout Europe about it. I'd do it for you but I'm out having fun in the local pub.[/p][/quote]Jack You have done this before and got all the answers. The funding came from Qatar. Qatar is not Saudi Arabia. Check the map. Google it once you return from the pub. Qatar is a liberal Muslim country. The Duke of Kent also visited the school. Why don't you mention this? Lord Shuttleworth also visited the school recently. Why do you not mention this? As regards the Princess from Saudi Arabia who visited the school, she has been championing the rights of women and female education for decades. I think Tauheedul was in a privileged position to have hosted her. So stop spreading these lies.[/p][/quote]Jack does it really make a difference where the money has come from, it has come from a legitimate group, if the money came from an illegal group the government would not have approved the boys school, take your racist views where the sun dont shine and keep it there, the school is providing an excellent community service, they are overly subscribed which is why they can pick whom ever they wish, i remember when i was leaving school my first prefence was Our Lady and St Johns RC School and i didnt even get a sniff at being sucessful there, why because they had criterias which i didnt fall under, no one complained then but ofcourse when a succesful muslim school has criterias you bring in your biggoted raicist view of segregation and integration. A school has a criteria which applies to everyone and you have to learn to respect that. coolguy
  • Score: 0

1:34am Sun 8 Apr 12

coolguy says...

Lifeinthemix wrote:
editor1988 wrote:
And another one ...

"Empty vessels make most noise"- usually they make a racket! Some of the comments made by these 'green eyed monsters' are just laughable and motivated by none other than hatred, jealousy,prejudice and, most importantly, ignorance. Coming to a judgement just because 'so and so says so' or because 'the school is a 'Muslim' school', or because ' I think that ......', without knowing the reality and the truth, is just diabolical. If you wish to know anything, then ask the right people - those who have dealt with the school or who know the school. When you get the answers, look at them with a fair mind and I am confident many of the misconceptions and prejudices will disappear. If one wears yellow sunglasses, everything they see will seem to be yellow! Take these glasses off and you will see the true colours.! If the LET decide to remove some comments, then hats off to them for that.
That is what the jews were encouraged to express in germany, your talk is that of an ignorant idiot who knows nothing of the history of Europe.

You clearly have absolutely no care for peace in this nation, you attract to yourself contempt deservedly.

You know i am sure the main thrust of the cry of the palastinians is that those who came into their lands would stop dictating terms not associated to their customs...they want peace the guests want war.

You appear to be copying the wrong attitude, and if this is a taste of what we can expect to be coming out of this school, then people are correct to express their concern.

the ball is in the court of those pushing this school.
makes me laugh since when did jews and germany come into the story published above. we are talking about the school not the war.
[quote][p][bold]Lifeinthemix[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]editor1988[/bold] wrote: And another one ... "Empty vessels make most noise"- usually they make a racket! Some of the comments made by these 'green eyed monsters' are just laughable and motivated by none other than hatred, jealousy,prejudice and, most importantly, ignorance. Coming to a judgement just because 'so and so says so' or because 'the school is a 'Muslim' school', or because ' I think that ......', without knowing the reality and the truth, is just diabolical. If you wish to know anything, then ask the right people - those who have dealt with the school or who know the school. When you get the answers, look at them with a fair mind and I am confident many of the misconceptions and prejudices will disappear. If one wears yellow sunglasses, everything they see will seem to be yellow! Take these glasses off and you will see the true colours.! If the LET decide to remove some comments, then hats off to them for that.[/p][/quote]That is what the jews were encouraged to express in germany, your talk is that of an ignorant idiot who knows nothing of the history of Europe. You clearly have absolutely no care for peace in this nation, you attract to yourself contempt deservedly. You know i am sure the main thrust of the cry of the palastinians is that those who came into their lands would stop dictating terms not associated to their customs...they want peace the guests want war. You appear to be copying the wrong attitude, and if this is a taste of what we can expect to be coming out of this school, then people are correct to express their concern. the ball is in the court of those pushing this school.[/p][/quote]makes me laugh since when did jews and germany come into the story published above. we are talking about the school not the war. coolguy
  • Score: 0

1:41am Sun 8 Apr 12

bmurtaja says...

coolguy wrote:
editor1988 wrote:
bmurtaja wrote:
Life in the Mix You seemed to be a very confused person. We are discussing the education of our children and you are referring to free masons and the history of Jewish people, and the Palestinians. Lets debate the substantial issues.
Could not agree more.

This is what Tauheedul has done for Blakewater where there are more than 80% white boys and girls. The improvement is unprecedented in its history.

Since the partnership began, there has been a substantial increase in the % of students achieving A*-C.

•In 2009 (before the partnership), 11% of students achieved 5A*-Cs with English and Maths.
•In 2010 (first year of partnership), 26% of students achieved 5A*-Cs with English and Maths.
•In 2011 (second year of partnership), 37% of students achieved 5A*-Cs with English and Maths.
absolutly brilliant, results dont lie and that is just a typical example of why Tauheedul needs to be a role model for other state and academies to look up too, a big well done to Mufti Abdul Hamid & co for the work that they are doing, i for one as a parent will be sending my children to schools which are either being supported to by Tauheedul or at Tauheedul
Jack

“You can only be jealous of someone who has something you think you ought to have yourself.”
― Margaret Atwood, The Handmaid's Tale
[quote][p][bold]coolguy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]editor1988[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]bmurtaja[/bold] wrote: Life in the Mix You seemed to be a very confused person. We are discussing the education of our children and you are referring to free masons and the history of Jewish people, and the Palestinians. Lets debate the substantial issues.[/p][/quote]Could not agree more. This is what Tauheedul has done for Blakewater where there are more than 80% white boys and girls. The improvement is unprecedented in its history. Since the partnership began, there has been a substantial increase in the % of students achieving A*-C. •In 2009 (before the partnership), 11% of students achieved 5A*-Cs with English and Maths. •In 2010 (first year of partnership), 26% of students achieved 5A*-Cs with English and Maths. •In 2011 (second year of partnership), 37% of students achieved 5A*-Cs with English and Maths.[/p][/quote]absolutly brilliant, results dont lie and that is just a typical example of why Tauheedul needs to be a role model for other state and academies to look up too, a big well done to Mufti Abdul Hamid & co for the work that they are doing, i for one as a parent will be sending my children to schools which are either being supported to by Tauheedul or at Tauheedul[/p][/quote]Jack “You can only be jealous of someone who has something you think you ought to have yourself.” ― Margaret Atwood, The Handmaid's Tale bmurtaja
  • Score: 0

1:44am Sun 8 Apr 12

bmurtaja says...

coolguy wrote:
Lifeinthemix wrote:
editor1988 wrote:
And another one ...

"Empty vessels make most noise"- usually they make a racket! Some of the comments made by these 'green eyed monsters' are just laughable and motivated by none other than hatred, jealousy,prejudice and, most importantly, ignorance. Coming to a judgement just because 'so and so says so' or because 'the school is a 'Muslim' school', or because ' I think that ......', without knowing the reality and the truth, is just diabolical. If you wish to know anything, then ask the right people - those who have dealt with the school or who know the school. When you get the answers, look at them with a fair mind and I am confident many of the misconceptions and prejudices will disappear. If one wears yellow sunglasses, everything they see will seem to be yellow! Take these glasses off and you will see the true colours.! If the LET decide to remove some comments, then hats off to them for that.
That is what the jews were encouraged to express in germany, your talk is that of an ignorant idiot who knows nothing of the history of Europe.

You clearly have absolutely no care for peace in this nation, you attract to yourself contempt deservedly.

You know i am sure the main thrust of the cry of the palastinians is that those who came into their lands would stop dictating terms not associated to their customs...they want peace the guests want war.

You appear to be copying the wrong attitude, and if this is a taste of what we can expect to be coming out of this school, then people are correct to express their concern.

the ball is in the court of those pushing this school.
makes me laugh since when did jews and germany come into the story published above. we are talking about the school not the war.
Some people prefer to make a war out of anti-Muslim sentiment. This does not surprise ...
[quote][p][bold]coolguy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Lifeinthemix[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]editor1988[/bold] wrote: And another one ... "Empty vessels make most noise"- usually they make a racket! Some of the comments made by these 'green eyed monsters' are just laughable and motivated by none other than hatred, jealousy,prejudice and, most importantly, ignorance. Coming to a judgement just because 'so and so says so' or because 'the school is a 'Muslim' school', or because ' I think that ......', without knowing the reality and the truth, is just diabolical. If you wish to know anything, then ask the right people - those who have dealt with the school or who know the school. When you get the answers, look at them with a fair mind and I am confident many of the misconceptions and prejudices will disappear. If one wears yellow sunglasses, everything they see will seem to be yellow! Take these glasses off and you will see the true colours.! If the LET decide to remove some comments, then hats off to them for that.[/p][/quote]That is what the jews were encouraged to express in germany, your talk is that of an ignorant idiot who knows nothing of the history of Europe. You clearly have absolutely no care for peace in this nation, you attract to yourself contempt deservedly. You know i am sure the main thrust of the cry of the palastinians is that those who came into their lands would stop dictating terms not associated to their customs...they want peace the guests want war. You appear to be copying the wrong attitude, and if this is a taste of what we can expect to be coming out of this school, then people are correct to express their concern. the ball is in the court of those pushing this school.[/p][/quote]makes me laugh since when did jews and germany come into the story published above. we are talking about the school not the war.[/p][/quote]Some people prefer to make a war out of anti-Muslim sentiment. This does not surprise ... bmurtaja
  • Score: 0

6:49am Sun 8 Apr 12

N4you! says...

ghanto wrote:
Some comments here are from people who wants publicity from this free mosque Mosques and school are there to learn and NOT "hear and go" like free foods speach People goes to mosques like showing very religious but dont learn anything As soon as they come out they start bnackbiting outside the mosques itself True and genuine old islam does no longer exists and modern islam and new rules are made. Whatever people likes is made islamic and what they dont like is not classed as none-islamic admit it
please read, please read, please read, please read, please read, please read, please read, please read,
please read, please read, please read, please read,

ghanto you should be called GANDO.

First of all you deffinately need to go back to school to educate yourself and learn how to spell your name (GANDO not ghanto).

My words might sound bitter for you (GANDO) and also for anyone else who follows the same ideology as you, the reason why i'm saying this is because if you read your comment very carefully you have made a statement which is saying that "the true and genuine old islam does not exist" if this is true then how are you a true muslim because the true islam does not exist, you must be a hypocrite because the truthful and authentic islam does exist all over the world, it's just you're deaf dumb and blind, very narrow minded extremist, you must have a brain of a chocolate frog.
[quote][p][bold]ghanto[/bold] wrote: Some comments here are from people who wants publicity from this free mosque Mosques and school are there to learn and NOT "hear and go" like free foods speach People goes to mosques like showing very religious but dont learn anything As soon as they come out they start bnackbiting outside the mosques itself True and genuine old islam does no longer exists and modern islam and new rules are made. Whatever people likes is made islamic and what they dont like is not classed as none-islamic admit it[/p][/quote]please read, please read, please read, please read, please read, please read, please read, please read, please read, please read, please read, please read, ghanto you should be called GANDO. First of all you deffinately need to go back to school to educate yourself and learn how to spell your name (GANDO not ghanto). My words might sound bitter for you (GANDO) and also for anyone else who follows the same ideology as you, the reason why i'm saying this is because if you read your comment very carefully you have made a statement which is saying that "the true and genuine old islam does not exist" if this is true then how are you a true muslim because the true islam does not exist, you must be a hypocrite because the truthful and authentic islam does exist all over the world, it's just you're deaf dumb and blind, very narrow minded extremist, you must have a brain of a chocolate frog. N4you!
  • Score: 0

9:15am Sun 8 Apr 12

jack daniels says...

N4you! wrote:
ghanto wrote:
Some comments here are from people who wants publicity from this free mosque Mosques and school are there to learn and NOT "hear and go" like free foods speach People goes to mosques like showing very religious but dont learn anything As soon as they come out they start bnackbiting outside the mosques itself True and genuine old islam does no longer exists and modern islam and new rules are made. Whatever people likes is made islamic and what they dont like is not classed as none-islamic admit it
please read, please read, please read, please read, please read, please read, please read, please read,
please read, please read, please read, please read,

ghanto you should be called GANDO.

First of all you deffinately need to go back to school to educate yourself and learn how to spell your name (GANDO not ghanto).

My words might sound bitter for you (GANDO) and also for anyone else who follows the same ideology as you, the reason why i'm saying this is because if you read your comment very carefully you have made a statement which is saying that "the true and genuine old islam does not exist" if this is true then how are you a true muslim because the true islam does not exist, you must be a hypocrite because the truthful and authentic islam does exist all over the world, it's just you're deaf dumb and blind, very narrow minded extremist, you must have a brain of a chocolate frog.
My, we have been busy little bee's. Glad to see you didn't waste your Saturday night.
[quote][p][bold]N4you![/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]ghanto[/bold] wrote: Some comments here are from people who wants publicity from this free mosque Mosques and school are there to learn and NOT "hear and go" like free foods speach People goes to mosques like showing very religious but dont learn anything As soon as they come out they start bnackbiting outside the mosques itself True and genuine old islam does no longer exists and modern islam and new rules are made. Whatever people likes is made islamic and what they dont like is not classed as none-islamic admit it[/p][/quote]please read, please read, please read, please read, please read, please read, please read, please read, please read, please read, please read, please read, ghanto you should be called GANDO. First of all you deffinately need to go back to school to educate yourself and learn how to spell your name (GANDO not ghanto). My words might sound bitter for you (GANDO) and also for anyone else who follows the same ideology as you, the reason why i'm saying this is because if you read your comment very carefully you have made a statement which is saying that "the true and genuine old islam does not exist" if this is true then how are you a true muslim because the true islam does not exist, you must be a hypocrite because the truthful and authentic islam does exist all over the world, it's just you're deaf dumb and blind, very narrow minded extremist, you must have a brain of a chocolate frog.[/p][/quote]My, we have been busy little bee's. Glad to see you didn't waste your Saturday night. jack daniels
  • Score: 0

9:32am Sun 8 Apr 12

StephenDes says...

Well, it's Easter Sunday now, and just when you thought it was safe to go out and visit the relatives and dish out the easter eggs to the little ones, you have a look at the LET and see that the recent postings have sunk to new depths of paranoia. I had recently been concerned at the government's proposals for snooping on people's emails and internet activity, but all this pales into insignificance when compared to the Big Brother that is 'lifeinthemix'. His suggestion that all families who attend Tauheedul should have their personal details looked into - their 'portfolios' - is truly shocking. Who does he think he is? Where does this end? What an outrageous liberty this man in taking with our freedoms, have we all of a sudden become North Korea? As other correspondents have rightly pointed out, the process for opening a school is a rigorous one, and one that has to satisfy the demands of the state. There cannot be the slightest hint of undeclared sources of income, or hidden funding, else it would be the DfE with egg on their faces. Lifeinthemix then has the pompous audacity to ask for more details of the 'banter' that takes place at the school, and what exactly is taught. As for the banter, heaven alone knows what they talk about. the way ahead is clearly hidden mcrophones and other illicit forms of surveillance. I think I can imagine what they talk about - ''Do you think that Kean is going to do the business for Rovers?' - 'Not sure, shame that Samba left, he was really solid.' Or possibly - 'it's either camelot or Blackpool at the end of term, which do you fancy?' - 'Neither to be honest. Let's just ask the kids.' Or most scary of all - 'Did you see Corrie last night?' - 'No, missed it.' I have no idea why lifeinthemix seesm to want to spy on people, but, call me old fashioned, but I think the right to privacy needs to be respected in this country, especially when the only thing that people seem to be suspicious about is the fact that some people they don't approve of have been to the school once. If that's the sole criteria for wanting to hear people's 'banter', then pretty much every school, college, business, football ground, pub, everywhere is dodgy. Shocking.
On the subject of what is taught, that's a complete no-brainer. A pretty scary bunch called Ofsted go through schools with a fine tooth comb, looking at policies, minutes of meetings, lesson plans, plus lots of lesson observations and chats with students and parents. Schools are under much more scrutiny than businesses in this country - ask any teacher. They are judge of what is taught in our schools and how well it is taught.
This insane paranoia at what Muslims might or might not get uup to is comes purely and simpy from ignorance and vile prejudice, and the stench of racism permeates much of what is written by some contributers. You are railing against something that is successful and has given scores of local young people a great start in life. Why you cannot find something to celebrate in that is desperately sad in my view, but then again, there is so little joy in the lives of racists.
Well, it's Easter Sunday now, and just when you thought it was safe to go out and visit the relatives and dish out the easter eggs to the little ones, you have a look at the LET and see that the recent postings have sunk to new depths of paranoia. I had recently been concerned at the government's proposals for snooping on people's emails and internet activity, but all this pales into insignificance when compared to the Big Brother that is 'lifeinthemix'. His suggestion that all families who attend Tauheedul should have their personal details looked into - their 'portfolios' - is truly shocking. Who does he think he is? Where does this end? What an outrageous liberty this man in taking with our freedoms, have we all of a sudden become North Korea? As other correspondents have rightly pointed out, the process for opening a school is a rigorous one, and one that has to satisfy the demands of the state. There cannot be the slightest hint of undeclared sources of income, or hidden funding, else it would be the DfE with egg on their faces. Lifeinthemix then has the pompous audacity to ask for more details of the 'banter' that takes place at the school, and what exactly is taught. As for the banter, heaven alone knows what they talk about. the way ahead is clearly hidden mcrophones and other illicit forms of surveillance. I think I can imagine what they talk about - ''Do you think that Kean is going to do the business for Rovers?' - 'Not sure, shame that Samba left, he was really solid.' Or possibly - 'it's either camelot or Blackpool at the end of term, which do you fancy?' - 'Neither to be honest. Let's just ask the kids.' Or most scary of all - 'Did you see Corrie last night?' - 'No, missed it.' I have no idea why lifeinthemix seesm to want to spy on people, but, call me old fashioned, but I think the right to privacy needs to be respected in this country, especially when the only thing that people seem to be suspicious about is the fact that some people they don't approve of have been to the school once. If that's the sole criteria for wanting to hear people's 'banter', then pretty much every school, college, business, football ground, pub, everywhere is dodgy. Shocking. On the subject of what is taught, that's a complete no-brainer. A pretty scary bunch called Ofsted go through schools with a fine tooth comb, looking at policies, minutes of meetings, lesson plans, plus lots of lesson observations and chats with students and parents. Schools are under much more scrutiny than businesses in this country - ask any teacher. They are judge of what is taught in our schools and how well it is taught. This insane paranoia at what Muslims might or might not get uup to is comes purely and simpy from ignorance and vile prejudice, and the stench of racism permeates much of what is written by some contributers. You are railing against something that is successful and has given scores of local young people a great start in life. Why you cannot find something to celebrate in that is desperately sad in my view, but then again, there is so little joy in the lives of racists. StephenDes
  • Score: 0

10:37am Sun 8 Apr 12

DGower says...

DGower wrote:
Abdul Qadir Qadiri wrote: If you are concerned like me about the consequences this school will have (if approved) like the worsening of segregation in the town and worse the please sign this petition to highlight your concern. Maybe we can make a difference!!! http://www.change.or g/petitions/departme nt-of-education-to-r efuse-the-applicatio n-for-the-olive-free -primary-school-blac kburn
Abdul, You talk about the "consequences" and other "worse" things this school will have. Other than the "segregation" issue, what else do you have to tell me before I decide whether or not to sign your petition, which, at present, isn't endearing me to sign up to it. Here is your opportunity to change my mind with your strong case. Go ahead............... ...
Abdul, your silence is deafening.
[quote][p][bold]DGower[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Abdul Qadir Qadiri[/bold] wrote: If you are concerned like me about the consequences this school will have (if approved) like the worsening of segregation in the town and worse the please sign this petition to highlight your concern. Maybe we can make a difference!!! http://www.change.or g/petitions/departme nt-of-education-to-r efuse-the-applicatio n-for-the-olive-free -primary-school-blac kburn[/p][/quote]Abdul, You talk about the "consequences" and other "worse" things this school will have. Other than the "segregation" issue, what else do you have to tell me before I decide whether or not to sign your petition, which, at present, isn't endearing me to sign up to it. Here is your opportunity to change my mind with your strong case. Go ahead............... ...[/p][/quote]Abdul, your silence is deafening. DGower
  • Score: 0

10:42am Sun 8 Apr 12

bmurtaja says...

StephenDes wrote:
Well, it's Easter Sunday now, and just when you thought it was safe to go out and visit the relatives and dish out the easter eggs to the little ones, you have a look at the LET and see that the recent postings have sunk to new depths of paranoia. I had recently been concerned at the government's proposals for snooping on people's emails and internet activity, but all this pales into insignificance when compared to the Big Brother that is 'lifeinthemix'. His suggestion that all families who attend Tauheedul should have their personal details looked into - their 'portfolios' - is truly shocking. Who does he think he is? Where does this end? What an outrageous liberty this man in taking with our freedoms, have we all of a sudden become North Korea? As other correspondents have rightly pointed out, the process for opening a school is a rigorous one, and one that has to satisfy the demands of the state. There cannot be the slightest hint of undeclared sources of income, or hidden funding, else it would be the DfE with egg on their faces. Lifeinthemix then has the pompous audacity to ask for more details of the 'banter' that takes place at the school, and what exactly is taught. As for the banter, heaven alone knows what they talk about. the way ahead is clearly hidden mcrophones and other illicit forms of surveillance. I think I can imagine what they talk about - ''Do you think that Kean is going to do the business for Rovers?' - 'Not sure, shame that Samba left, he was really solid.' Or possibly - 'it's either camelot or Blackpool at the end of term, which do you fancy?' - 'Neither to be honest. Let's just ask the kids.' Or most scary of all - 'Did you see Corrie last night?' - 'No, missed it.' I have no idea why lifeinthemix seesm to want to spy on people, but, call me old fashioned, but I think the right to privacy needs to be respected in this country, especially when the only thing that people seem to be suspicious about is the fact that some people they don't approve of have been to the school once. If that's the sole criteria for wanting to hear people's 'banter', then pretty much every school, college, business, football ground, pub, everywhere is dodgy. Shocking.
On the subject of what is taught, that's a complete no-brainer. A pretty scary bunch called Ofsted go through schools with a fine tooth comb, looking at policies, minutes of meetings, lesson plans, plus lots of lesson observations and chats with students and parents. Schools are under much more scrutiny than businesses in this country - ask any teacher. They are judge of what is taught in our schools and how well it is taught.
This insane paranoia at what Muslims might or might not get uup to is comes purely and simpy from ignorance and vile prejudice, and the stench of racism permeates much of what is written by some contributers. You are railing against something that is successful and has given scores of local young people a great start in life. Why you cannot find something to celebrate in that is desperately sad in my view, but then again, there is so little joy in the lives of racists.
Stephen

Either it is ignorance or a deep rooted hatred for the Muslims. Irrespective, this does not justify racist comments and anti-Muslim remarks.

It is Easter Sunday, and let us all unite in congratulating Tauheedul and wish them the best in their proposals.
[quote][p][bold]StephenDes[/bold] wrote: Well, it's Easter Sunday now, and just when you thought it was safe to go out and visit the relatives and dish out the easter eggs to the little ones, you have a look at the LET and see that the recent postings have sunk to new depths of paranoia. I had recently been concerned at the government's proposals for snooping on people's emails and internet activity, but all this pales into insignificance when compared to the Big Brother that is 'lifeinthemix'. His suggestion that all families who attend Tauheedul should have their personal details looked into - their 'portfolios' - is truly shocking. Who does he think he is? Where does this end? What an outrageous liberty this man in taking with our freedoms, have we all of a sudden become North Korea? As other correspondents have rightly pointed out, the process for opening a school is a rigorous one, and one that has to satisfy the demands of the state. There cannot be the slightest hint of undeclared sources of income, or hidden funding, else it would be the DfE with egg on their faces. Lifeinthemix then has the pompous audacity to ask for more details of the 'banter' that takes place at the school, and what exactly is taught. As for the banter, heaven alone knows what they talk about. the way ahead is clearly hidden mcrophones and other illicit forms of surveillance. I think I can imagine what they talk about - ''Do you think that Kean is going to do the business for Rovers?' - 'Not sure, shame that Samba left, he was really solid.' Or possibly - 'it's either camelot or Blackpool at the end of term, which do you fancy?' - 'Neither to be honest. Let's just ask the kids.' Or most scary of all - 'Did you see Corrie last night?' - 'No, missed it.' I have no idea why lifeinthemix seesm to want to spy on people, but, call me old fashioned, but I think the right to privacy needs to be respected in this country, especially when the only thing that people seem to be suspicious about is the fact that some people they don't approve of have been to the school once. If that's the sole criteria for wanting to hear people's 'banter', then pretty much every school, college, business, football ground, pub, everywhere is dodgy. Shocking. On the subject of what is taught, that's a complete no-brainer. A pretty scary bunch called Ofsted go through schools with a fine tooth comb, looking at policies, minutes of meetings, lesson plans, plus lots of lesson observations and chats with students and parents. Schools are under much more scrutiny than businesses in this country - ask any teacher. They are judge of what is taught in our schools and how well it is taught. This insane paranoia at what Muslims might or might not get uup to is comes purely and simpy from ignorance and vile prejudice, and the stench of racism permeates much of what is written by some contributers. You are railing against something that is successful and has given scores of local young people a great start in life. Why you cannot find something to celebrate in that is desperately sad in my view, but then again, there is so little joy in the lives of racists.[/p][/quote]Stephen Either it is ignorance or a deep rooted hatred for the Muslims. Irrespective, this does not justify racist comments and anti-Muslim remarks. It is Easter Sunday, and let us all unite in congratulating Tauheedul and wish them the best in their proposals. bmurtaja
  • Score: 0

10:42am Sun 8 Apr 12

bmurtaja says...

StephenDes wrote:
Well, it's Easter Sunday now, and just when you thought it was safe to go out and visit the relatives and dish out the easter eggs to the little ones, you have a look at the LET and see that the recent postings have sunk to new depths of paranoia. I had recently been concerned at the government's proposals for snooping on people's emails and internet activity, but all this pales into insignificance when compared to the Big Brother that is 'lifeinthemix'. His suggestion that all families who attend Tauheedul should have their personal details looked into - their 'portfolios' - is truly shocking. Who does he think he is? Where does this end? What an outrageous liberty this man in taking with our freedoms, have we all of a sudden become North Korea? As other correspondents have rightly pointed out, the process for opening a school is a rigorous one, and one that has to satisfy the demands of the state. There cannot be the slightest hint of undeclared sources of income, or hidden funding, else it would be the DfE with egg on their faces. Lifeinthemix then has the pompous audacity to ask for more details of the 'banter' that takes place at the school, and what exactly is taught. As for the banter, heaven alone knows what they talk about. the way ahead is clearly hidden mcrophones and other illicit forms of surveillance. I think I can imagine what they talk about - ''Do you think that Kean is going to do the business for Rovers?' - 'Not sure, shame that Samba left, he was really solid.' Or possibly - 'it's either camelot or Blackpool at the end of term, which do you fancy?' - 'Neither to be honest. Let's just ask the kids.' Or most scary of all - 'Did you see Corrie last night?' - 'No, missed it.' I have no idea why lifeinthemix seesm to want to spy on people, but, call me old fashioned, but I think the right to privacy needs to be respected in this country, especially when the only thing that people seem to be suspicious about is the fact that some people they don't approve of have been to the school once. If that's the sole criteria for wanting to hear people's 'banter', then pretty much every school, college, business, football ground, pub, everywhere is dodgy. Shocking.
On the subject of what is taught, that's a complete no-brainer. A pretty scary bunch called Ofsted go through schools with a fine tooth comb, looking at policies, minutes of meetings, lesson plans, plus lots of lesson observations and chats with students and parents. Schools are under much more scrutiny than businesses in this country - ask any teacher. They are judge of what is taught in our schools and how well it is taught.
This insane paranoia at what Muslims might or might not get uup to is comes purely and simpy from ignorance and vile prejudice, and the stench of racism permeates much of what is written by some contributers. You are railing against something that is successful and has given scores of local young people a great start in life. Why you cannot find something to celebrate in that is desperately sad in my view, but then again, there is so little joy in the lives of racists.
Stephen

Either it is ignorance or a deep rooted hatred for the Muslims. Irrespective, this does not justify racist comments and anti-Muslim remarks.

It is Easter Sunday, and let us all unite in congratulating Tauheedul and wish them the best in their proposals.
[quote][p][bold]StephenDes[/bold] wrote: Well, it's Easter Sunday now, and just when you thought it was safe to go out and visit the relatives and dish out the easter eggs to the little ones, you have a look at the LET and see that the recent postings have sunk to new depths of paranoia. I had recently been concerned at the government's proposals for snooping on people's emails and internet activity, but all this pales into insignificance when compared to the Big Brother that is 'lifeinthemix'. His suggestion that all families who attend Tauheedul should have their personal details looked into - their 'portfolios' - is truly shocking. Who does he think he is? Where does this end? What an outrageous liberty this man in taking with our freedoms, have we all of a sudden become North Korea? As other correspondents have rightly pointed out, the process for opening a school is a rigorous one, and one that has to satisfy the demands of the state. There cannot be the slightest hint of undeclared sources of income, or hidden funding, else it would be the DfE with egg on their faces. Lifeinthemix then has the pompous audacity to ask for more details of the 'banter' that takes place at the school, and what exactly is taught. As for the banter, heaven alone knows what they talk about. the way ahead is clearly hidden mcrophones and other illicit forms of surveillance. I think I can imagine what they talk about - ''Do you think that Kean is going to do the business for Rovers?' - 'Not sure, shame that Samba left, he was really solid.' Or possibly - 'it's either camelot or Blackpool at the end of term, which do you fancy?' - 'Neither to be honest. Let's just ask the kids.' Or most scary of all - 'Did you see Corrie last night?' - 'No, missed it.' I have no idea why lifeinthemix seesm to want to spy on people, but, call me old fashioned, but I think the right to privacy needs to be respected in this country, especially when the only thing that people seem to be suspicious about is the fact that some people they don't approve of have been to the school once. If that's the sole criteria for wanting to hear people's 'banter', then pretty much every school, college, business, football ground, pub, everywhere is dodgy. Shocking. On the subject of what is taught, that's a complete no-brainer. A pretty scary bunch called Ofsted go through schools with a fine tooth comb, looking at policies, minutes of meetings, lesson plans, plus lots of lesson observations and chats with students and parents. Schools are under much more scrutiny than businesses in this country - ask any teacher. They are judge of what is taught in our schools and how well it is taught. This insane paranoia at what Muslims might or might not get uup to is comes purely and simpy from ignorance and vile prejudice, and the stench of racism permeates much of what is written by some contributers. You are railing against something that is successful and has given scores of local young people a great start in life. Why you cannot find something to celebrate in that is desperately sad in my view, but then again, there is so little joy in the lives of racists.[/p][/quote]Stephen Either it is ignorance or a deep rooted hatred for the Muslims. Irrespective, this does not justify racist comments and anti-Muslim remarks. It is Easter Sunday, and let us all unite in congratulating Tauheedul and wish them the best in their proposals. bmurtaja
  • Score: 0

11:24am Sun 8 Apr 12

coolguy says...

bmurtaja wrote:
coolguy wrote:
editor1988 wrote:
bmurtaja wrote:
Life in the Mix You seemed to be a very confused person. We are discussing the education of our children and you are referring to free masons and the history of Jewish people, and the Palestinians. Lets debate the substantial issues.
Could not agree more.

This is what Tauheedul has done for Blakewater where there are more than 80% white boys and girls. The improvement is unprecedented in its history.

Since the partnership began, there has been a substantial increase in the % of students achieving A*-C.

•In 2009 (before the partnership), 11% of students achieved 5A*-Cs with English and Maths.
•In 2010 (first year of partnership), 26% of students achieved 5A*-Cs with English and Maths.
•In 2011 (second year of partnership), 37% of students achieved 5A*-Cs with English and Maths.
absolutly brilliant, results dont lie and that is just a typical example of why Tauheedul needs to be a role model for other state and academies to look up too, a big well done to Mufti Abdul Hamid & co for the work that they are doing, i for one as a parent will be sending my children to schools which are either being supported to by Tauheedul or at Tauheedul
Jack

“You can only be jealous of someone who has something you think you ought to have yourself.”
― Margaret Atwood, The Handmaid's Tale
very well put
[quote][p][bold]bmurtaja[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]coolguy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]editor1988[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]bmurtaja[/bold] wrote: Life in the Mix You seemed to be a very confused person. We are discussing the education of our children and you are referring to free masons and the history of Jewish people, and the Palestinians. Lets debate the substantial issues.[/p][/quote]Could not agree more. This is what Tauheedul has done for Blakewater where there are more than 80% white boys and girls. The improvement is unprecedented in its history. Since the partnership began, there has been a substantial increase in the % of students achieving A*-C. •In 2009 (before the partnership), 11% of students achieved 5A*-Cs with English and Maths. •In 2010 (first year of partnership), 26% of students achieved 5A*-Cs with English and Maths. •In 2011 (second year of partnership), 37% of students achieved 5A*-Cs with English and Maths.[/p][/quote]absolutly brilliant, results dont lie and that is just a typical example of why Tauheedul needs to be a role model for other state and academies to look up too, a big well done to Mufti Abdul Hamid & co for the work that they are doing, i for one as a parent will be sending my children to schools which are either being supported to by Tauheedul or at Tauheedul[/p][/quote]Jack “You can only be jealous of someone who has something you think you ought to have yourself.” ― Margaret Atwood, The Handmaid's Tale[/p][/quote]very well put coolguy
  • Score: 0

11:31am Sun 8 Apr 12

retired one says...

Integration or Segregation?
That is the question.
Integration or Segregation? That is the question. retired one
  • Score: 0

11:33am Sun 8 Apr 12

coolguy says...

jack daniels wrote:
coolguy wrote:
Abdul Qadir Qadiri wrote:
If you are concerned like me about the consequences this school will have (if approved) like the worsening of segregation in the town and worse the please sign this petition to highlight your concern. Maybe we can make a difference!!!
http://www.change.or



g/petitions/departme



nt-of-education-to-r



efuse-the-applicatio



n-for-the-olive-free



-primary-school-blac



kburn
Abdul if your worried about segregation well let me tell you one thing if my children can come home with results like Tauheedul have achieved with their pass rates i would choose segregation over integration anyday
Hey, maybe if you lived in the middle east, where all the mosque funding comes from, your life would be fantastic. ;-)
Jack i was born here, i work here, i pay my taxes here i am as much of a british citizen as you are and have the same rights as what you have. i am merely expressing my opinion, im staying here and will not be living or going no where near the middle east to live, if you dont like the way the society is living maybe you could go and live in the north pole.
[quote][p][bold]jack daniels[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]coolguy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Abdul Qadir Qadiri[/bold] wrote: If you are concerned like me about the consequences this school will have (if approved) like the worsening of segregation in the town and worse the please sign this petition to highlight your concern. Maybe we can make a difference!!! http://www.change.or g/petitions/departme nt-of-education-to-r efuse-the-applicatio n-for-the-olive-free -primary-school-blac kburn[/p][/quote]Abdul if your worried about segregation well let me tell you one thing if my children can come home with results like Tauheedul have achieved with their pass rates i would choose segregation over integration anyday[/p][/quote]Hey, maybe if you lived in the middle east, where all the mosque funding comes from, your life would be fantastic. ;-)[/p][/quote]Jack i was born here, i work here, i pay my taxes here i am as much of a british citizen as you are and have the same rights as what you have. i am merely expressing my opinion, im staying here and will not be living or going no where near the middle east to live, if you dont like the way the society is living maybe you could go and live in the north pole. coolguy
  • Score: 0

11:37am Sun 8 Apr 12

Lifeinthemix says...

Missing the point...
the education system you so lovingly push in the face of the taxpayers is nothing to brag about.

Programming is the order of the dasy, thus great results means excellent programmers.

This is the syatem being pushed on the children by adults who should know better :

https://www.lifeinth
emix.info/2012/03/pr
ofile-froebel-educat
ion-method-reich/

you call it rascism to expose the tavistock garbage in all our schools only prove your ignorance, but you are not alone, thre quarters of all white parents are clueless as to what is going on the schools.

Muslims cease in the victim mentality, you are creating your own relaity with your hip responses to valid concerns.

Free shools are not what they seem and when you have such as Straw and Shuttleworth and the Duke of kent loving it....it is time to get worried.

time will show this to be so.
Missing the point... the education system you so lovingly push in the face of the taxpayers is nothing to brag about. Programming is the order of the dasy, thus great results means excellent programmers. This is the syatem being pushed on the children by adults who should know better : https://www.lifeinth emix.info/2012/03/pr ofile-froebel-educat ion-method-reich/ you call it rascism to expose the tavistock garbage in all our schools only prove your ignorance, but you are not alone, thre quarters of all white parents are clueless as to what is going on the schools. Muslims cease in the victim mentality, you are creating your own relaity with your hip responses to valid concerns. Free shools are not what they seem and when you have such as Straw and Shuttleworth and the Duke of kent loving it....it is time to get worried. time will show this to be so. Lifeinthemix
  • Score: 0

12:03pm Sun 8 Apr 12

sallythomson says...

retired one wrote:
Integration or Segregation? That is the question.
Not really about segregation or integration. Unfortunately, a majority of Blackburn with Darwen schools are segregated. Look at Pleckgate - it is 100% asian, witton park will soon become 100% asian, it is only matter of time that Blakewater will be asian. Darwen Academy, Darwen Vale, St.Bedes are 100% white. The situation in primary schools is worst. Nearly half the primary schools are 100% asian. Our problem is quality. Blackburn lacks good schools. The LA has to take some responsibility for this but so do the local schools.
[quote][p][bold]retired one[/bold] wrote: Integration or Segregation? That is the question.[/p][/quote]Not really about segregation or integration. Unfortunately, a majority of Blackburn with Darwen schools are segregated. Look at Pleckgate - it is 100% asian, witton park will soon become 100% asian, it is only matter of time that Blakewater will be asian. Darwen Academy, Darwen Vale, St.Bedes are 100% white. The situation in primary schools is worst. Nearly half the primary schools are 100% asian. Our problem is quality. Blackburn lacks good schools. The LA has to take some responsibility for this but so do the local schools. sallythomson
  • Score: 0

12:09pm Sun 8 Apr 12

Lifeinthemix says...

let us debate this :

You know i am sure the main thrust of the cry of the palastinians is that those who came into their lands would stop dictating terms not associated to their customs...they want peace the guests want war.

As a journalist it would not be conducive to my career to make it up, what I present is fact as i find it, feel free to counter with sound argument not just swimming in the pool of sewage like exam results and OFSTED, who grade schools based on their willingness to collect data and pass it on to the corporations, fact.

so what have you left to persuade the taxpayers that what we moved to remove (elitist schools based entirely on money) should be brought back when the majority of people are without the cash thanks to the masonic way of doing business, speculative masonry?

In this country we have a constitution which prevents any and all outside interference within this nation...how do you square foreign cash eductaing british nationals to a script perhaps not conducive to the british way?

would it be ok for me to go to India and demand my rights to get sloshed all day every day just because it is of my culture, that all in India must allow me my cultural rights because I have spare cash to do it?

simple fact is, I would not dream of doing such out of a morality also of my culture which would prevent me from forcing my will in a nation in which I was guest.

so far I see a difference in morality that stands between us.
let us debate this : You know i am sure the main thrust of the cry of the palastinians is that those who came into their lands would stop dictating terms not associated to their customs...they want peace the guests want war. As a journalist it would not be conducive to my career to make it up, what I present is fact as i find it, feel free to counter with sound argument not just swimming in the pool of sewage like exam results and OFSTED, who grade schools based on their willingness to collect data and pass it on to the corporations, fact. so what have you left to persuade the taxpayers that what we moved to remove (elitist schools based entirely on money) should be brought back when the majority of people are without the cash thanks to the masonic way of doing business, speculative masonry? In this country we have a constitution which prevents any and all outside interference within this nation...how do you square foreign cash eductaing british nationals to a script perhaps not conducive to the british way? would it be ok for me to go to India and demand my rights to get sloshed all day every day just because it is of my culture, that all in India must allow me my cultural rights because I have spare cash to do it? simple fact is, I would not dream of doing such out of a morality also of my culture which would prevent me from forcing my will in a nation in which I was guest. so far I see a difference in morality that stands between us. Lifeinthemix
  • Score: 0

12:11pm Sun 8 Apr 12

sallythomson says...

StephenDes wrote:
Well, it's Easter Sunday now, and just when you thought it was safe to go out and visit the relatives and dish out the easter eggs to the little ones, you have a look at the LET and see that the recent postings have sunk to new depths of paranoia. I had recently been concerned at the government's proposals for snooping on people's emails and internet activity, but all this pales into insignificance when compared to the Big Brother that is 'lifeinthemix'. His suggestion that all families who attend Tauheedul should have their personal details looked into - their 'portfolios' - is truly shocking. Who does he think he is? Where does this end? What an outrageous liberty this man in taking with our freedoms, have we all of a sudden become North Korea? As other correspondents have rightly pointed out, the process for opening a school is a rigorous one, and one that has to satisfy the demands of the state. There cannot be the slightest hint of undeclared sources of income, or hidden funding, else it would be the DfE with egg on their faces. Lifeinthemix then has the pompous audacity to ask for more details of the 'banter' that takes place at the school, and what exactly is taught. As for the banter, heaven alone knows what they talk about. the way ahead is clearly hidden mcrophones and other illicit forms of surveillance. I think I can imagine what they talk about - ''Do you think that Kean is going to do the business for Rovers?' - 'Not sure, shame that Samba left, he was really solid.' Or possibly - 'it's either camelot or Blackpool at the end of term, which do you fancy?' - 'Neither to be honest. Let's just ask the kids.' Or most scary of all - 'Did you see Corrie last night?' - 'No, missed it.' I have no idea why lifeinthemix seesm to want to spy on people, but, call me old fashioned, but I think the right to privacy needs to be respected in this country, especially when the only thing that people seem to be suspicious about is the fact that some people they don't approve of have been to the school once. If that's the sole criteria for wanting to hear people's 'banter', then pretty much every school, college, business, football ground, pub, everywhere is dodgy. Shocking. On the subject of what is taught, that's a complete no-brainer. A pretty scary bunch called Ofsted go through schools with a fine tooth comb, looking at policies, minutes of meetings, lesson plans, plus lots of lesson observations and chats with students and parents. Schools are under much more scrutiny than businesses in this country - ask any teacher. They are judge of what is taught in our schools and how well it is taught. This insane paranoia at what Muslims might or might not get uup to is comes purely and simpy from ignorance and vile prejudice, and the stench of racism permeates much of what is written by some contributers. You are railing against something that is successful and has given scores of local young people a great start in life. Why you cannot find something to celebrate in that is desperately sad in my view, but then again, there is so little joy in the lives of racists.
You make some good points. However, i do not think this is about racism. The people of blackburn have been deprived from a quality debate about the future of education in the town. BSF was lip service. The comments demonstrate a need for an open, transparent and inclusive debate on how we are going to mend our broken education system.
[quote][p][bold]StephenDes[/bold] wrote: Well, it's Easter Sunday now, and just when you thought it was safe to go out and visit the relatives and dish out the easter eggs to the little ones, you have a look at the LET and see that the recent postings have sunk to new depths of paranoia. I had recently been concerned at the government's proposals for snooping on people's emails and internet activity, but all this pales into insignificance when compared to the Big Brother that is 'lifeinthemix'. His suggestion that all families who attend Tauheedul should have their personal details looked into - their 'portfolios' - is truly shocking. Who does he think he is? Where does this end? What an outrageous liberty this man in taking with our freedoms, have we all of a sudden become North Korea? As other correspondents have rightly pointed out, the process for opening a school is a rigorous one, and one that has to satisfy the demands of the state. There cannot be the slightest hint of undeclared sources of income, or hidden funding, else it would be the DfE with egg on their faces. Lifeinthemix then has the pompous audacity to ask for more details of the 'banter' that takes place at the school, and what exactly is taught. As for the banter, heaven alone knows what they talk about. the way ahead is clearly hidden mcrophones and other illicit forms of surveillance. I think I can imagine what they talk about - ''Do you think that Kean is going to do the business for Rovers?' - 'Not sure, shame that Samba left, he was really solid.' Or possibly - 'it's either camelot or Blackpool at the end of term, which do you fancy?' - 'Neither to be honest. Let's just ask the kids.' Or most scary of all - 'Did you see Corrie last night?' - 'No, missed it.' I have no idea why lifeinthemix seesm to want to spy on people, but, call me old fashioned, but I think the right to privacy needs to be respected in this country, especially when the only thing that people seem to be suspicious about is the fact that some people they don't approve of have been to the school once. If that's the sole criteria for wanting to hear people's 'banter', then pretty much every school, college, business, football ground, pub, everywhere is dodgy. Shocking. On the subject of what is taught, that's a complete no-brainer. A pretty scary bunch called Ofsted go through schools with a fine tooth comb, looking at policies, minutes of meetings, lesson plans, plus lots of lesson observations and chats with students and parents. Schools are under much more scrutiny than businesses in this country - ask any teacher. They are judge of what is taught in our schools and how well it is taught. This insane paranoia at what Muslims might or might not get uup to is comes purely and simpy from ignorance and vile prejudice, and the stench of racism permeates much of what is written by some contributers. You are railing against something that is successful and has given scores of local young people a great start in life. Why you cannot find something to celebrate in that is desperately sad in my view, but then again, there is so little joy in the lives of racists.[/p][/quote]You make some good points. However, i do not think this is about racism. The people of blackburn have been deprived from a quality debate about the future of education in the town. BSF was lip service. The comments demonstrate a need for an open, transparent and inclusive debate on how we are going to mend our broken education system. sallythomson
  • Score: 0

12:13pm Sun 8 Apr 12

editor1988 says...

coolguy wrote:
bmurtaja wrote:
coolguy wrote:
editor1988 wrote:
bmurtaja wrote: Life in the Mix You seemed to be a very confused person. We are discussing the education of our children and you are referring to free masons and the history of Jewish people, and the Palestinians. Lets debate the substantial issues.
Could not agree more. This is what Tauheedul has done for Blakewater where there are more than 80% white boys and girls. The improvement is unprecedented in its history. Since the partnership began, there has been a substantial increase in the % of students achieving A*-C. •In 2009 (before the partnership), 11% of students achieved 5A*-Cs with English and Maths. •In 2010 (first year of partnership), 26% of students achieved 5A*-Cs with English and Maths. •In 2011 (second year of partnership), 37% of students achieved 5A*-Cs with English and Maths.
absolutly brilliant, results dont lie and that is just a typical example of why Tauheedul needs to be a role model for other state and academies to look up too, a big well done to Mufti Abdul Hamid & co for the work that they are doing, i for one as a parent will be sending my children to schools which are either being supported to by Tauheedul or at Tauheedul
Jack “You can only be jealous of someone who has something you think you ought to have yourself.” ― Margaret Atwood, The Handmaid's Tale
very well put
Agree.
[quote][p][bold]coolguy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]bmurtaja[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]coolguy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]editor1988[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]bmurtaja[/bold] wrote: Life in the Mix You seemed to be a very confused person. We are discussing the education of our children and you are referring to free masons and the history of Jewish people, and the Palestinians. Lets debate the substantial issues.[/p][/quote]Could not agree more. This is what Tauheedul has done for Blakewater where there are more than 80% white boys and girls. The improvement is unprecedented in its history. Since the partnership began, there has been a substantial increase in the % of students achieving A*-C. •In 2009 (before the partnership), 11% of students achieved 5A*-Cs with English and Maths. •In 2010 (first year of partnership), 26% of students achieved 5A*-Cs with English and Maths. •In 2011 (second year of partnership), 37% of students achieved 5A*-Cs with English and Maths.[/p][/quote]absolutly brilliant, results dont lie and that is just a typical example of why Tauheedul needs to be a role model for other state and academies to look up too, a big well done to Mufti Abdul Hamid & co for the work that they are doing, i for one as a parent will be sending my children to schools which are either being supported to by Tauheedul or at Tauheedul[/p][/quote]Jack “You can only be jealous of someone who has something you think you ought to have yourself.” ― Margaret Atwood, The Handmaid's Tale[/p][/quote]very well put[/p][/quote]Agree. editor1988
  • Score: 0

12:14pm Sun 8 Apr 12

sallythomson says...

Lifeinthemix wrote:
let us debate this : You know i am sure the main thrust of the cry of the palastinians is that those who came into their lands would stop dictating terms not associated to their customs...they want peace the guests want war. As a journalist it would not be conducive to my career to make it up, what I present is fact as i find it, feel free to counter with sound argument not just swimming in the pool of sewage like exam results and OFSTED, who grade schools based on their willingness to collect data and pass it on to the corporations, fact. so what have you left to persuade the taxpayers that what we moved to remove (elitist schools based entirely on money) should be brought back when the majority of people are without the cash thanks to the masonic way of doing business, speculative masonry? In this country we have a constitution which prevents any and all outside interference within this nation...how do you square foreign cash eductaing british nationals to a script perhaps not conducive to the british way? would it be ok for me to go to India and demand my rights to get sloshed all day every day just because it is of my culture, that all in India must allow me my cultural rights because I have spare cash to do it? simple fact is, I would not dream of doing such out of a morality also of my culture which would prevent me from forcing my will in a nation in which I was guest. so far I see a difference in morality that stands between us.
You make some interesting points. I would still argue that unless the Council sorts out the quality of education in our schools groups we will continue to see more of these schools.
[quote][p][bold]Lifeinthemix[/bold] wrote: let us debate this : You know i am sure the main thrust of the cry of the palastinians is that those who came into their lands would stop dictating terms not associated to their customs...they want peace the guests want war. As a journalist it would not be conducive to my career to make it up, what I present is fact as i find it, feel free to counter with sound argument not just swimming in the pool of sewage like exam results and OFSTED, who grade schools based on their willingness to collect data and pass it on to the corporations, fact. so what have you left to persuade the taxpayers that what we moved to remove (elitist schools based entirely on money) should be brought back when the majority of people are without the cash thanks to the masonic way of doing business, speculative masonry? In this country we have a constitution which prevents any and all outside interference within this nation...how do you square foreign cash eductaing british nationals to a script perhaps not conducive to the british way? would it be ok for me to go to India and demand my rights to get sloshed all day every day just because it is of my culture, that all in India must allow me my cultural rights because I have spare cash to do it? simple fact is, I would not dream of doing such out of a morality also of my culture which would prevent me from forcing my will in a nation in which I was guest. so far I see a difference in morality that stands between us.[/p][/quote]You make some interesting points. I would still argue that unless the Council sorts out the quality of education in our schools groups we will continue to see more of these schools. sallythomson
  • Score: 0

12:27pm Sun 8 Apr 12

Lifeinthemix says...

sallythomson wrote:
Lifeinthemix wrote:
let us debate this : You know i am sure the main thrust of the cry of the palastinians is that those who came into their lands would stop dictating terms not associated to their customs...they want peace the guests want war. As a journalist it would not be conducive to my career to make it up, what I present is fact as i find it, feel free to counter with sound argument not just swimming in the pool of sewage like exam results and OFSTED, who grade schools based on their willingness to collect data and pass it on to the corporations, fact. so what have you left to persuade the taxpayers that what we moved to remove (elitist schools based entirely on money) should be brought back when the majority of people are without the cash thanks to the masonic way of doing business, speculative masonry? In this country we have a constitution which prevents any and all outside interference within this nation...how do you square foreign cash eductaing british nationals to a script perhaps not conducive to the british way? would it be ok for me to go to India and demand my rights to get sloshed all day every day just because it is of my culture, that all in India must allow me my cultural rights because I have spare cash to do it? simple fact is, I would not dream of doing such out of a morality also of my culture which would prevent me from forcing my will in a nation in which I was guest. so far I see a difference in morality that stands between us.
You make some interesting points. I would still argue that unless the Council sorts out the quality of education in our schools groups we will continue to see more of these schools.
the problem is we have become so dependant upon the state we have forgotton we hand over some £168.9 billion per year tax take, we don't wait for the state to sort this out we demand it be so.

this is how the country used to operate.

the masonic and other secret society networks, including all pseudo-Muslim societies have in secret shifted all our civil requirements into the hands of the same secret societies who just love all things Intelligence.

their MO is to fully takover the civil system by incorporating everything.

Benito Mussolini stated that fascism shpould really be termed corporatism.

ergo, anything promoting what was a national concern to be shifted into a private corporate concern is pushing fascism-corporatism.


facts is facts which in turn is knowledge, the Koran encourages all Muslims to seek knowledge, not act with spin.

these are pseudo-Muslims interested not in knowledge but hard cash and power.

the free schools in almost every case of those we have investigated, have some seriously twisted ideologs and personell to boot, be they Hindu, Christian, Jewish or other.

What we have are serious programming centres in order the works accomplished by the father is pushed onto the son, to carry it on....


its as old as time itself and as history shows well...it only serves the psychopaths that they can reamin in power.

If the education is bad then all who suffer it follow suit, enrgy follows thought and such.....
[quote][p][bold]sallythomson[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Lifeinthemix[/bold] wrote: let us debate this : You know i am sure the main thrust of the cry of the palastinians is that those who came into their lands would stop dictating terms not associated to their customs...they want peace the guests want war. As a journalist it would not be conducive to my career to make it up, what I present is fact as i find it, feel free to counter with sound argument not just swimming in the pool of sewage like exam results and OFSTED, who grade schools based on their willingness to collect data and pass it on to the corporations, fact. so what have you left to persuade the taxpayers that what we moved to remove (elitist schools based entirely on money) should be brought back when the majority of people are without the cash thanks to the masonic way of doing business, speculative masonry? In this country we have a constitution which prevents any and all outside interference within this nation...how do you square foreign cash eductaing british nationals to a script perhaps not conducive to the british way? would it be ok for me to go to India and demand my rights to get sloshed all day every day just because it is of my culture, that all in India must allow me my cultural rights because I have spare cash to do it? simple fact is, I would not dream of doing such out of a morality also of my culture which would prevent me from forcing my will in a nation in which I was guest. so far I see a difference in morality that stands between us.[/p][/quote]You make some interesting points. I would still argue that unless the Council sorts out the quality of education in our schools groups we will continue to see more of these schools.[/p][/quote]the problem is we have become so dependant upon the state we have forgotton we hand over some £168.9 billion per year tax take, we don't wait for the state to sort this out we demand it be so. this is how the country used to operate. the masonic and other secret society networks, including all pseudo-Muslim societies have in secret shifted all our civil requirements into the hands of the same secret societies who just love all things Intelligence. their MO is to fully takover the civil system by incorporating everything. Benito Mussolini stated that fascism shpould really be termed corporatism. ergo, anything promoting what was a national concern to be shifted into a private corporate concern is pushing fascism-corporatism. facts is facts which in turn is knowledge, the Koran encourages all Muslims to seek knowledge, not act with spin. these are pseudo-Muslims interested not in knowledge but hard cash and power. the free schools in almost every case of those we have investigated, have some seriously twisted ideologs and personell to boot, be they Hindu, Christian, Jewish or other. What we have are serious programming centres in order the works accomplished by the father is pushed onto the son, to carry it on.... its as old as time itself and as history shows well...it only serves the psychopaths that they can reamin in power. If the education is bad then all who suffer it follow suit, enrgy follows thought and such..... Lifeinthemix
  • Score: 0

12:30pm Sun 8 Apr 12

Lifeinthemix says...

Jack “You can only be jealous of someone who has something you think you ought to have yourself.” ― Margaret Atwood, The Handmaid's Tale

and of course the handmaids tale is all about being a happy slave, as such is a serious piece of programming.

you are what you absorb
Jack “You can only be jealous of someone who has something you think you ought to have yourself.” ― Margaret Atwood, The Handmaid's Tale and of course the handmaids tale is all about being a happy slave, as such is a serious piece of programming. you are what you absorb Lifeinthemix
  • Score: 0

1:36pm Sun 8 Apr 12

Lifeinthemix says...

Pushing the free schools are this merry bunch, all connected to the Adelphi terrace, the seat of the corporate empire :

New Schools Network claim to be an independent group, however they are most certainly not independent Adam street gang

What we describe as the 'John Adam St Gang' are those insitutions located roughly between The Strand, Embankment, Craven Street and Lancaster Place (indicated on this map):

http://www.scribd.co
m/doc/28845356/Heron
-House-FRM-Financial
-Risk-Mana gement-Map

Extensive list of institutions in the area: http://www.scribd.co
m/John%20Adam%20St%2
0Gang:%20Crown%20Con
trol

List of occult institutions in the John Adam St Gang (many historic)
http://www.scribd.co
m/John_Adam_St_Gang_
Occult_Theosophy

History of the area: http://www.scribd.co
m/doc/25462764/170-A
delphi-Royal-Houses-
Literary-H istory

More here: http://www.lifeinthe
mixtalk.com/?p=3305

____________________
____________________
____________________
________

New Schools Network

Of the below names, eight out of the thirteen can be linked to the John Adam St Gang:

* Sir Geoffrey Owen

Sir Geoffrey is a former editor of the Financial Times and is a Senior Fellow at the London School of Economics.

(Financial Times owned by Pearsons, located in Shell Mex House, London School of Economics founded at Adelphi, so hence both institutions of the John Adam St Gang).

* Amanda Spielman

Amanda Spielman is research and development director of the academy operator ARK Schools, where she is also responsible for strategic legal, governance and regulatory matters. She was recently a member of the Sykes review group commissioned by Michael Gove to review the school assessment system. She has an MA in Comparative Education from the Institute of Education. She is also a chartered accountant and spent over 15 years in private equity, mergers & acquisitions, and corporate strategy in the UK and the US for Kleinwort Benson, Mercer Management Consulting, and Nomura International Principal Finance Group.

ARK located at 15 Adam St, hence of the John Adam St Gang

* Sir Bruce Liddington

Sir Bruce is the former Schools Commissioner for England, and is the Director General of EACT – an education foundation opening Academies across England. He is former head of Northampton School for Boys, whose performance he transformed, and held several posts in the Academies Directorate.

* Theodore Agnew

Theodore is Deputy Chairman of Jubilee Managing Agency. He is also Chairman of the Norfolk Community Foundation, and a trustee of Policy Exchange.

Family publishes Whitaker's Almanac, buried under Cleopatra's Needle, between Shell-Mex and Adelphi House. (Agnew family details here: http://www.911forum.
org.uk/board/viewtop
ic.php?t=19345)

* Barbara Harrison

Barbara is the former chief executive of the Girls’ Day School Trust, one of the largest and most successful providers of independent education in the UK. She established the first independent sector Academy (The Belvedere) in Liverpool, closely followed by Birkenhead High.


* Professor Julian Le Grand

Professor Le Grand is Richard Titmuss Professor of Social Policy at the London School of Economics. He was one of Tony Blair’s key advisers and has written books on the use of market systems in public services – including education.

London School of Economics founded at Adelphi, John Adam St Gang.


* Baroness Sally Morgan

Sally is an adviser to Ark Academies. She is a former Director of Government Relations at 10 Downing Street and senior adviser to Tony Blair. Originally a secondary school teacher Sally has a BA (Hons) in Geography from Durham University, PGCE from London University and MA in Comparative Education from the Institute of Education.

ARK at 15 Adam st, John Adam St Gang.

Morgan's husband John Lyon has been with Liberty (more on Liberty below).

* Rev Tim Hastie-Smith

Tim was head of Dean Close in Cheltenham for ten years, and is a former chair of the Headmasters’ and Headmistresses’ Conference. He has been a school governor for a wide range of schools, and currently runs Perrett Laver’s practice within schools and colleges.

* Heath Monk

Heath is Chief Executive of Future Leaders which develops the next generation of leaders for challenging schools. He is the former Deputy Schools Commissioner. He also spent six years as a secondary teacher of English and Drama, having read English Literature at Queen’s College, Oxford.

Future Leaders located at 15 Adam St, London and funded by ARK, so hence of the John Adam St Gang

* Geoffrey Davies

Geoffrey is a former partner for Lewis Silkin, where he acts as a consultant. He has helped to establish around 60 Academies, working with many of the major sponsors. He is on the board of ULT – a multi-Academy sponsor.

Geoffrey Davies Solicitors are located at 21 Buckingham Street, which runs off John Adam St, parallel to Adam St. Curiously, this firm has the same phone number as Lewis Silken, located at Windsor House, 50 Victoria St, London.

Lewis Silken write the academy funding agreements, and are associated with Liberty, which links to the PIE, Paedophile Information Exchange.

(article here: http://www.telegraph
.co.uk/news/newstopi
cs/politics/labour/4
949555/Har riet-Harman-under-at
tack-over-bid-to-wat
er-down-child-pornog
raphy-law. html)

* James Merriman

James is CEO of the New York City Charter School Center, which serves as a resource and facilitator for new charter schools. He is the former director of the Charter Schools Institute of the State University of New York (SUNY), one of America’s largest authorisers of charter schools.

* Ian Cleland

Ian is the Chief Executive of the Ormiston Academies Trust, a multi-Academy sponsor. He has been a Visiting Professor at Wolverhampton University. He has extensive experience of education consultancy at a senior level with KPMG, DCSF and Local Authorities and is a former head.

* Paul Marshall

Paul Marshall is the co-founder and Chairman of Marshall Wace LLP. He is also a co-founder and trustee of ARK – a multi academy sponsor – and of the charity Every Child a Chance. He is chair of the Management Committee of the liberal think tank CentreForum.

ARK at 15 Adam St,
Pushing the free schools are this merry bunch, all connected to the Adelphi terrace, the seat of the corporate empire : New Schools Network claim to be an independent group, however they are most certainly not independent Adam street gang What we describe as the 'John Adam St Gang' are those insitutions located roughly between The Strand, Embankment, Craven Street and Lancaster Place (indicated on this map): http://www.scribd.co m/doc/28845356/Heron -House-FRM-Financial -Risk-Mana gement-Map Extensive list of institutions in the area: http://www.scribd.co m/John%20Adam%20St%2 0Gang:%20Crown%20Con trol List of occult institutions in the John Adam St Gang (many historic) http://www.scribd.co m/John_Adam_St_Gang_ Occult_Theosophy History of the area: http://www.scribd.co m/doc/25462764/170-A delphi-Royal-Houses- Literary-H istory More here: http://www.lifeinthe mixtalk.com/?p=3305 ____________________ ____________________ ____________________ ________ New Schools Network Of the below names, eight out of the thirteen can be linked to the John Adam St Gang: * Sir Geoffrey Owen Sir Geoffrey is a former editor of the Financial Times and is a Senior Fellow at the London School of Economics. (Financial Times owned by Pearsons, located in Shell Mex House, London School of Economics founded at Adelphi, so hence both institutions of the John Adam St Gang). * Amanda Spielman Amanda Spielman is research and development director of the academy operator ARK Schools, where she is also responsible for strategic legal, governance and regulatory matters. She was recently a member of the Sykes review group commissioned by Michael Gove to review the school assessment system. She has an MA in Comparative Education from the Institute of Education. She is also a chartered accountant and spent over 15 years in private equity, mergers & acquisitions, and corporate strategy in the UK and the US for Kleinwort Benson, Mercer Management Consulting, and Nomura International Principal Finance Group. ARK located at 15 Adam St, hence of the John Adam St Gang * Sir Bruce Liddington Sir Bruce is the former Schools Commissioner for England, and is the Director General of EACT – an education foundation opening Academies across England. He is former head of Northampton School for Boys, whose performance he transformed, and held several posts in the Academies Directorate. * Theodore Agnew Theodore is Deputy Chairman of Jubilee Managing Agency. He is also Chairman of the Norfolk Community Foundation, and a trustee of Policy Exchange. Family publishes Whitaker's Almanac, buried under Cleopatra's Needle, between Shell-Mex and Adelphi House. (Agnew family details here: http://www.911forum. org.uk/board/viewtop ic.php?t=19345) * Barbara Harrison Barbara is the former chief executive of the Girls’ Day School Trust, one of the largest and most successful providers of independent education in the UK. She established the first independent sector Academy (The Belvedere) in Liverpool, closely followed by Birkenhead High. * Professor Julian Le Grand Professor Le Grand is Richard Titmuss Professor of Social Policy at the London School of Economics. He was one of Tony Blair’s key advisers and has written books on the use of market systems in public services – including education. London School of Economics founded at Adelphi, John Adam St Gang. * Baroness Sally Morgan Sally is an adviser to Ark Academies. She is a former Director of Government Relations at 10 Downing Street and senior adviser to Tony Blair. Originally a secondary school teacher Sally has a BA (Hons) in Geography from Durham University, PGCE from London University and MA in Comparative Education from the Institute of Education. ARK at 15 Adam st, John Adam St Gang. Morgan's husband John Lyon has been with Liberty (more on Liberty below). * Rev Tim Hastie-Smith Tim was head of Dean Close in Cheltenham for ten years, and is a former chair of the Headmasters’ and Headmistresses’ Conference. He has been a school governor for a wide range of schools, and currently runs Perrett Laver’s practice within schools and colleges. * Heath Monk Heath is Chief Executive of Future Leaders which develops the next generation of leaders for challenging schools. He is the former Deputy Schools Commissioner. He also spent six years as a secondary teacher of English and Drama, having read English Literature at Queen’s College, Oxford. Future Leaders located at 15 Adam St, London and funded by ARK, so hence of the John Adam St Gang * Geoffrey Davies Geoffrey is a former partner for Lewis Silkin, where he acts as a consultant. He has helped to establish around 60 Academies, working with many of the major sponsors. He is on the board of ULT – a multi-Academy sponsor. Geoffrey Davies Solicitors are located at 21 Buckingham Street, which runs off John Adam St, parallel to Adam St. Curiously, this firm has the same phone number as Lewis Silken, located at Windsor House, 50 Victoria St, London. Lewis Silken write the academy funding agreements, and are associated with Liberty, which links to the PIE, Paedophile Information Exchange. (article here: http://www.telegraph .co.uk/news/newstopi cs/politics/labour/4 949555/Har riet-Harman-under-at tack-over-bid-to-wat er-down-child-pornog raphy-law. html) * James Merriman James is CEO of the New York City Charter School Center, which serves as a resource and facilitator for new charter schools. He is the former director of the Charter Schools Institute of the State University of New York (SUNY), one of America’s largest authorisers of charter schools. * Ian Cleland Ian is the Chief Executive of the Ormiston Academies Trust, a multi-Academy sponsor. He has been a Visiting Professor at Wolverhampton University. He has extensive experience of education consultancy at a senior level with KPMG, DCSF and Local Authorities and is a former head. * Paul Marshall Paul Marshall is the co-founder and Chairman of Marshall Wace LLP. He is also a co-founder and trustee of ARK – a multi academy sponsor – and of the charity Every Child a Chance. He is chair of the Management Committee of the liberal think tank CentreForum. ARK at 15 Adam St, Lifeinthemix
  • Score: 0

1:42pm Sun 8 Apr 12

sallythomson says...

Lifeinthemix wrote:
Pushing the free schools are this merry bunch, all connected to the Adelphi terrace, the seat of the corporate empire : New Schools Network claim to be an independent group, however they are most certainly not independent Adam street gang What we describe as the 'John Adam St Gang' are those insitutions located roughly between The Strand, Embankment, Craven Street and Lancaster Place (indicated on this map): http://www.scribd.co m/doc/28845356/Heron -House-FRM-Financial -Risk-Mana gement-Map Extensive list of institutions in the area: http://www.scribd.co m/John%20Adam%20St%2 0Gang:%20Crown%20Con trol List of occult institutions in the John Adam St Gang (many historic) http://www.scribd.co m/John_Adam_St_Gang_ Occult_Theosophy History of the area: http://www.scribd.co m/doc/25462764/170-A delphi-Royal-Houses- Literary-H istory More here: http://www.lifeinthe mixtalk.com/?p=3305 ____________________ ____________________ ____________________ ________ New Schools Network Of the below names, eight out of the thirteen can be linked to the John Adam St Gang: * Sir Geoffrey Owen Sir Geoffrey is a former editor of the Financial Times and is a Senior Fellow at the London School of Economics. (Financial Times owned by Pearsons, located in Shell Mex House, London School of Economics founded at Adelphi, so hence both institutions of the John Adam St Gang). * Amanda Spielman Amanda Spielman is research and development director of the academy operator ARK Schools, where she is also responsible for strategic legal, governance and regulatory matters. She was recently a member of the Sykes review group commissioned by Michael Gove to review the school assessment system. She has an MA in Comparative Education from the Institute of Education. She is also a chartered accountant and spent over 15 years in private equity, mergers & acquisitions, and corporate strategy in the UK and the US for Kleinwort Benson, Mercer Management Consulting, and Nomura International Principal Finance Group. ARK located at 15 Adam St, hence of the John Adam St Gang * Sir Bruce Liddington Sir Bruce is the former Schools Commissioner for England, and is the Director General of EACT – an education foundation opening Academies across England. He is former head of Northampton School for Boys, whose performance he transformed, and held several posts in the Academies Directorate. * Theodore Agnew Theodore is Deputy Chairman of Jubilee Managing Agency. He is also Chairman of the Norfolk Community Foundation, and a trustee of Policy Exchange. Family publishes Whitaker's Almanac, buried under Cleopatra's Needle, between Shell-Mex and Adelphi House. (Agnew family details here: http://www.911forum. org.uk/board/viewtop ic.php?t=19345) * Barbara Harrison Barbara is the former chief executive of the Girls’ Day School Trust, one of the largest and most successful providers of independent education in the UK. She established the first independent sector Academy (The Belvedere) in Liverpool, closely followed by Birkenhead High. * Professor Julian Le Grand Professor Le Grand is Richard Titmuss Professor of Social Policy at the London School of Economics. He was one of Tony Blair’s key advisers and has written books on the use of market systems in public services – including education. London School of Economics founded at Adelphi, John Adam St Gang. * Baroness Sally Morgan Sally is an adviser to Ark Academies. She is a former Director of Government Relations at 10 Downing Street and senior adviser to Tony Blair. Originally a secondary school teacher Sally has a BA (Hons) in Geography from Durham University, PGCE from London University and MA in Comparative Education from the Institute of Education. ARK at 15 Adam st, John Adam St Gang. Morgan's husband John Lyon has been with Liberty (more on Liberty below). * Rev Tim Hastie-Smith Tim was head of Dean Close in Cheltenham for ten years, and is a former chair of the Headmasters’ and Headmistresses’ Conference. He has been a school governor for a wide range of schools, and currently runs Perrett Laver’s practice within schools and colleges. * Heath Monk Heath is Chief Executive of Future Leaders which develops the next generation of leaders for challenging schools. He is the former Deputy Schools Commissioner. He also spent six years as a secondary teacher of English and Drama, having read English Literature at Queen’s College, Oxford. Future Leaders located at 15 Adam St, London and funded by ARK, so hence of the John Adam St Gang * Geoffrey Davies Geoffrey is a former partner for Lewis Silkin, where he acts as a consultant. He has helped to establish around 60 Academies, working with many of the major sponsors. He is on the board of ULT – a multi-Academy sponsor. Geoffrey Davies Solicitors are located at 21 Buckingham Street, which runs off John Adam St, parallel to Adam St. Curiously, this firm has the same phone number as Lewis Silken, located at Windsor House, 50 Victoria St, London. Lewis Silken write the academy funding agreements, and are associated with Liberty, which links to the PIE, Paedophile Information Exchange. (article here: http://www.telegraph .co.uk/news/newstopi cs/politics/labour/4 949555/Har riet-Harman-under-at tack-over-bid-to-wat er-down-child-pornog raphy-law. html) * James Merriman James is CEO of the New York City Charter School Center, which serves as a resource and facilitator for new charter schools. He is the former director of the Charter Schools Institute of the State University of New York (SUNY), one of America’s largest authorisers of charter schools. * Ian Cleland Ian is the Chief Executive of the Ormiston Academies Trust, a multi-Academy sponsor. He has been a Visiting Professor at Wolverhampton University. He has extensive experience of education consultancy at a senior level with KPMG, DCSF and Local Authorities and is a former head. * Paul Marshall Paul Marshall is the co-founder and Chairman of Marshall Wace LLP. He is also a co-founder and trustee of ARK – a multi academy sponsor – and of the charity Every Child a Chance. He is chair of the Management Committee of the liberal think tank CentreForum. ARK at 15 Adam St,
So your point is?
[quote][p][bold]Lifeinthemix[/bold] wrote: Pushing the free schools are this merry bunch, all connected to the Adelphi terrace, the seat of the corporate empire : New Schools Network claim to be an independent group, however they are most certainly not independent Adam street gang What we describe as the 'John Adam St Gang' are those insitutions located roughly between The Strand, Embankment, Craven Street and Lancaster Place (indicated on this map): http://www.scribd.co m/doc/28845356/Heron -House-FRM-Financial -Risk-Mana gement-Map Extensive list of institutions in the area: http://www.scribd.co m/John%20Adam%20St%2 0Gang:%20Crown%20Con trol List of occult institutions in the John Adam St Gang (many historic) http://www.scribd.co m/John_Adam_St_Gang_ Occult_Theosophy History of the area: http://www.scribd.co m/doc/25462764/170-A delphi-Royal-Houses- Literary-H istory More here: http://www.lifeinthe mixtalk.com/?p=3305 ____________________ ____________________ ____________________ ________ New Schools Network Of the below names, eight out of the thirteen can be linked to the John Adam St Gang: * Sir Geoffrey Owen Sir Geoffrey is a former editor of the Financial Times and is a Senior Fellow at the London School of Economics. (Financial Times owned by Pearsons, located in Shell Mex House, London School of Economics founded at Adelphi, so hence both institutions of the John Adam St Gang). * Amanda Spielman Amanda Spielman is research and development director of the academy operator ARK Schools, where she is also responsible for strategic legal, governance and regulatory matters. She was recently a member of the Sykes review group commissioned by Michael Gove to review the school assessment system. She has an MA in Comparative Education from the Institute of Education. She is also a chartered accountant and spent over 15 years in private equity, mergers & acquisitions, and corporate strategy in the UK and the US for Kleinwort Benson, Mercer Management Consulting, and Nomura International Principal Finance Group. ARK located at 15 Adam St, hence of the John Adam St Gang * Sir Bruce Liddington Sir Bruce is the former Schools Commissioner for England, and is the Director General of EACT – an education foundation opening Academies across England. He is former head of Northampton School for Boys, whose performance he transformed, and held several posts in the Academies Directorate. * Theodore Agnew Theodore is Deputy Chairman of Jubilee Managing Agency. He is also Chairman of the Norfolk Community Foundation, and a trustee of Policy Exchange. Family publishes Whitaker's Almanac, buried under Cleopatra's Needle, between Shell-Mex and Adelphi House. (Agnew family details here: http://www.911forum. org.uk/board/viewtop ic.php?t=19345) * Barbara Harrison Barbara is the former chief executive of the Girls’ Day School Trust, one of the largest and most successful providers of independent education in the UK. She established the first independent sector Academy (The Belvedere) in Liverpool, closely followed by Birkenhead High. * Professor Julian Le Grand Professor Le Grand is Richard Titmuss Professor of Social Policy at the London School of Economics. He was one of Tony Blair’s key advisers and has written books on the use of market systems in public services – including education. London School of Economics founded at Adelphi, John Adam St Gang. * Baroness Sally Morgan Sally is an adviser to Ark Academies. She is a former Director of Government Relations at 10 Downing Street and senior adviser to Tony Blair. Originally a secondary school teacher Sally has a BA (Hons) in Geography from Durham University, PGCE from London University and MA in Comparative Education from the Institute of Education. ARK at 15 Adam st, John Adam St Gang. Morgan's husband John Lyon has been with Liberty (more on Liberty below). * Rev Tim Hastie-Smith Tim was head of Dean Close in Cheltenham for ten years, and is a former chair of the Headmasters’ and Headmistresses’ Conference. He has been a school governor for a wide range of schools, and currently runs Perrett Laver’s practice within schools and colleges. * Heath Monk Heath is Chief Executive of Future Leaders which develops the next generation of leaders for challenging schools. He is the former Deputy Schools Commissioner. He also spent six years as a secondary teacher of English and Drama, having read English Literature at Queen’s College, Oxford. Future Leaders located at 15 Adam St, London and funded by ARK, so hence of the John Adam St Gang * Geoffrey Davies Geoffrey is a former partner for Lewis Silkin, where he acts as a consultant. He has helped to establish around 60 Academies, working with many of the major sponsors. He is on the board of ULT – a multi-Academy sponsor. Geoffrey Davies Solicitors are located at 21 Buckingham Street, which runs off John Adam St, parallel to Adam St. Curiously, this firm has the same phone number as Lewis Silken, located at Windsor House, 50 Victoria St, London. Lewis Silken write the academy funding agreements, and are associated with Liberty, which links to the PIE, Paedophile Information Exchange. (article here: http://www.telegraph .co.uk/news/newstopi cs/politics/labour/4 949555/Har riet-Harman-under-at tack-over-bid-to-wat er-down-child-pornog raphy-law. html) * James Merriman James is CEO of the New York City Charter School Center, which serves as a resource and facilitator for new charter schools. He is the former director of the Charter Schools Institute of the State University of New York (SUNY), one of America’s largest authorisers of charter schools. * Ian Cleland Ian is the Chief Executive of the Ormiston Academies Trust, a multi-Academy sponsor. He has been a Visiting Professor at Wolverhampton University. He has extensive experience of education consultancy at a senior level with KPMG, DCSF and Local Authorities and is a former head. * Paul Marshall Paul Marshall is the co-founder and Chairman of Marshall Wace LLP. He is also a co-founder and trustee of ARK – a multi academy sponsor – and of the charity Every Child a Chance. He is chair of the Management Committee of the liberal think tank CentreForum. ARK at 15 Adam St,[/p][/quote]So your point is? sallythomson
  • Score: 0

1:44pm Sun 8 Apr 12

Lifeinthemix says...

try reading?
try reading? Lifeinthemix
  • Score: 0

1:45pm Sun 8 Apr 12

sallythomson says...

editor1988 wrote:
l m h jones wrote:
editor1988 wrote: http://www.independe nt.co.uk/news/educat ion/education-news/m uslim-school-helps-o ut-secular-neighbour -2129777.html Critics may disagree with faith schools but read this article and make up your own mind objectively from the comments of the Headteacher of Blakewater.
yes i understand that the ethos of Tauheedul school has been fantastic in raising aspirations of blakewater what worries me is the whole concept of "free" schools being outside the control of local authorities are we seeing the rise of schools teaching creationism as a valid scientific theory for example?
At last the real debate begins. I appreciate the concern about free schools being outside of local authority control. However, note that: 1. More than half secondary schools in the country has already become academies i.e. outside of local authority control. The government wants all schools to follow suit as it is financially more viable and more beneficial from an educational perspective. Remember free schools are a type of academy. St Wilfrids has become an academy. 2. Local authorities do not really control the curriculum so you could well have a local authority school that teaches creationism (if that is what you fear about free schools) 3. To teach creationism is not allowed and all free school proposers are required to sign a declaration to this effect. If the DfE find out, they can terminate the contract and close the school. 4. The broader debate is what role have local authorities played in managing schools. Take Blackburn as an example. What does the local authority do with the finances it takes from each school's budget? Are our schools improving? Of course parents are not necessarily the solution and the Free School policy has its weaknesses, but where you have organisations like Tauheedul doing what the local authority should have done, then this is surely welcome.
It is only matter of time that all schools will be out of local authority control. The more progressive local authorities have already started to encourage their schools to become academies.
[quote][p][bold]editor1988[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]l m h jones[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]editor1988[/bold] wrote: http://www.independe nt.co.uk/news/educat ion/education-news/m uslim-school-helps-o ut-secular-neighbour -2129777.html Critics may disagree with faith schools but read this article and make up your own mind objectively from the comments of the Headteacher of Blakewater.[/p][/quote]yes i understand that the ethos of Tauheedul school has been fantastic in raising aspirations of blakewater what worries me is the whole concept of "free" schools being outside the control of local authorities are we seeing the rise of schools teaching creationism as a valid scientific theory for example?[/p][/quote]At last the real debate begins. I appreciate the concern about free schools being outside of local authority control. However, note that: 1. More than half secondary schools in the country has already become academies i.e. outside of local authority control. The government wants all schools to follow suit as it is financially more viable and more beneficial from an educational perspective. Remember free schools are a type of academy. St Wilfrids has become an academy. 2. Local authorities do not really control the curriculum so you could well have a local authority school that teaches creationism (if that is what you fear about free schools) 3. To teach creationism is not allowed and all free school proposers are required to sign a declaration to this effect. If the DfE find out, they can terminate the contract and close the school. 4. The broader debate is what role have local authorities played in managing schools. Take Blackburn as an example. What does the local authority do with the finances it takes from each school's budget? Are our schools improving? Of course parents are not necessarily the solution and the Free School policy has its weaknesses, but where you have organisations like Tauheedul doing what the local authority should have done, then this is surely welcome.[/p][/quote]It is only matter of time that all schools will be out of local authority control. The more progressive local authorities have already started to encourage their schools to become academies. sallythomson
  • Score: 0

1:48pm Sun 8 Apr 12

sallythomson says...

Lifeinthemix wrote:
try reading?
So, what is your solution? How do we sort out the mess? I was left with no alternative but to send my son to St Christophers.
[quote][p][bold]Lifeinthemix[/bold] wrote: try reading?[/p][/quote]So, what is your solution? How do we sort out the mess? I was left with no alternative but to send my son to St Christophers. sallythomson
  • Score: 0

1:53pm Sun 8 Apr 12

sallythomson says...

editor1988 wrote:
http://www.independe nt.co.uk/news/educat ion/education-news/m uslim-school-helps-o ut-secular-neighbour -2129777.html Critics may disagree with faith schools but read this article and make up your own mind objectively from the comments of the Headteacher of Blakewater.
An inspirational story - demonstrates how faith and community schools can work together to improve outcomes for all young people.
[quote][p][bold]editor1988[/bold] wrote: http://www.independe nt.co.uk/news/educat ion/education-news/m uslim-school-helps-o ut-secular-neighbour -2129777.html Critics may disagree with faith schools but read this article and make up your own mind objectively from the comments of the Headteacher of Blakewater.[/p][/quote]An inspirational story - demonstrates how faith and community schools can work together to improve outcomes for all young people. sallythomson
  • Score: 0

1:56pm Sun 8 Apr 12

blackburn4life says...

sallythomson wrote:
editor1988 wrote:
http://www.independe nt.co.uk/news/educat ion/education-news/m uslim-school-helps-o ut-secular-neighbour -2129777.html Critics may disagree with faith schools but read this article and make up your own mind objectively from the comments of the Headteacher of Blakewater.
An inspirational story - demonstrates how faith and community schools can work together to improve outcomes for all young people.
I couldn't agree more
[quote][p][bold]sallythomson[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]editor1988[/bold] wrote: http://www.independe nt.co.uk/news/educat ion/education-news/m uslim-school-helps-o ut-secular-neighbour -2129777.html Critics may disagree with faith schools but read this article and make up your own mind objectively from the comments of the Headteacher of Blakewater.[/p][/quote]An inspirational story - demonstrates how faith and community schools can work together to improve outcomes for all young people.[/p][/quote]I couldn't agree more blackburn4life
  • Score: 0

2:15pm Sun 8 Apr 12

Chris P Bacon says...

sallythomson wrote:
Lifeinthemix wrote:
Pushing the free schools are this merry bunch, all connected to the Adelphi terrace, the seat of the corporate empire : New Schools Network claim to be an independent group, however they are most certainly not independent Adam street gang What we describe as the 'John Adam St Gang' are those insitutions located roughly between The Strand, Embankment, Craven Street and Lancaster Place (indicated on this map): http://www.scribd.co m/doc/28845356/Heron -House-FRM-Financial -Risk-Mana gement-Map Extensive list of institutions in the area: http://www.scribd.co m/John%20Adam%20St%2 0Gang:%20Crown%20Con trol List of occult institutions in the John Adam St Gang (many historic) http://www.scribd.co m/John_Adam_St_Gang_ Occult_Theosophy History of the area: http://www.scribd.co m/doc/25462764/170-A delphi-Royal-Houses- Literary-H istory More here: http://www.lifeinthe mixtalk.com/?p=3305 ____________________ ____________________ ____________________ ________ New Schools Network Of the below names, eight out of the thirteen can be linked to the John Adam St Gang: * Sir Geoffrey Owen Sir Geoffrey is a former editor of the Financial Times and is a Senior Fellow at the London School of Economics. (Financial Times owned by Pearsons, located in Shell Mex House, London School of Economics founded at Adelphi, so hence both institutions of the John Adam St Gang). * Amanda Spielman Amanda Spielman is research and development director of the academy operator ARK Schools, where she is also responsible for strategic legal, governance and regulatory matters. She was recently a member of the Sykes review group commissioned by Michael Gove to review the school assessment system. She has an MA in Comparative Education from the Institute of Education. She is also a chartered accountant and spent over 15 years in private equity, mergers & acquisitions, and corporate strategy in the UK and the US for Kleinwort Benson, Mercer Management Consulting, and Nomura International Principal Finance Group. ARK located at 15 Adam St, hence of the John Adam St Gang * Sir Bruce Liddington Sir Bruce is the former Schools Commissioner for England, and is the Director General of EACT – an education foundation opening Academies across England. He is former head of Northampton School for Boys, whose performance he transformed, and held several posts in the Academies Directorate. * Theodore Agnew Theodore is Deputy Chairman of Jubilee Managing Agency. He is also Chairman of the Norfolk Community Foundation, and a trustee of Policy Exchange. Family publishes Whitaker's Almanac, buried under Cleopatra's Needle, between Shell-Mex and Adelphi House. (Agnew family details here: http://www.911forum. org.uk/board/viewtop ic.php?t=19345) * Barbara Harrison Barbara is the former chief executive of the Girls’ Day School Trust, one of the largest and most successful providers of independent education in the UK. She established the first independent sector Academy (The Belvedere) in Liverpool, closely followed by Birkenhead High. * Professor Julian Le Grand Professor Le Grand is Richard Titmuss Professor of Social Policy at the London School of Economics. He was one of Tony Blair’s key advisers and has written books on the use of market systems in public services – including education. London School of Economics founded at Adelphi, John Adam St Gang. * Baroness Sally Morgan Sally is an adviser to Ark Academies. She is a former Director of Government Relations at 10 Downing Street and senior adviser to Tony Blair. Originally a secondary school teacher Sally has a BA (Hons) in Geography from Durham University, PGCE from London University and MA in Comparative Education from the Institute of Education. ARK at 15 Adam st, John Adam St Gang. Morgan's husband John Lyon has been with Liberty (more on Liberty below). * Rev Tim Hastie-Smith Tim was head of Dean Close in Cheltenham for ten years, and is a former chair of the Headmasters’ and Headmistresses’ Conference. He has been a school governor for a wide range of schools, and currently runs Perrett Laver’s practice within schools and colleges. * Heath Monk Heath is Chief Executive of Future Leaders which develops the next generation of leaders for challenging schools. He is the former Deputy Schools Commissioner. He also spent six years as a secondary teacher of English and Drama, having read English Literature at Queen’s College, Oxford. Future Leaders located at 15 Adam St, London and funded by ARK, so hence of the John Adam St Gang * Geoffrey Davies Geoffrey is a former partner for Lewis Silkin, where he acts as a consultant. He has helped to establish around 60 Academies, working with many of the major sponsors. He is on the board of ULT – a multi-Academy sponsor. Geoffrey Davies Solicitors are located at 21 Buckingham Street, which runs off John Adam St, parallel to Adam St. Curiously, this firm has the same phone number as Lewis Silken, located at Windsor House, 50 Victoria St, London. Lewis Silken write the academy funding agreements, and are associated with Liberty, which links to the PIE, Paedophile Information Exchange. (article here: http://www.telegraph .co.uk/news/newstopi cs/politics/labour/4 949555/Har riet-Harman-under-at tack-over-bid-to-wat er-down-child-pornog raphy-law. html) * James Merriman James is CEO of the New York City Charter School Center, which serves as a resource and facilitator for new charter schools. He is the former director of the Charter Schools Institute of the State University of New York (SUNY), one of America’s largest authorisers of charter schools. * Ian Cleland Ian is the Chief Executive of the Ormiston Academies Trust, a multi-Academy sponsor. He has been a Visiting Professor at Wolverhampton University. He has extensive experience of education consultancy at a senior level with KPMG, DCSF and Local Authorities and is a former head. * Paul Marshall Paul Marshall is the co-founder and Chairman of Marshall Wace LLP. He is also a co-founder and trustee of ARK – a multi academy sponsor – and of the charity Every Child a Chance. He is chair of the Management Committee of the liberal think tank CentreForum. ARK at 15 Adam St,
So your point is?
That he can cut-and-paste more worthless drivel that no-one can be bothered polluting their minds with than anyone else.

And if I lived in or near Blackburn, I would do anything and everything in my power to change that sad state of affairs. What an appalling state of affairs people have let come into being through apathy and bone-idleness. Now I'm not suggesting for one second you should let the fascist scum gain any unwarranted credence but come on, get yourselves together, organise and defeat this intolerable society you've let fester.
[quote][p][bold]sallythomson[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Lifeinthemix[/bold] wrote: Pushing the free schools are this merry bunch, all connected to the Adelphi terrace, the seat of the corporate empire : New Schools Network claim to be an independent group, however they are most certainly not independent Adam street gang What we describe as the 'John Adam St Gang' are those insitutions located roughly between The Strand, Embankment, Craven Street and Lancaster Place (indicated on this map): http://www.scribd.co m/doc/28845356/Heron -House-FRM-Financial -Risk-Mana gement-Map Extensive list of institutions in the area: http://www.scribd.co m/John%20Adam%20St%2 0Gang:%20Crown%20Con trol List of occult institutions in the John Adam St Gang (many historic) http://www.scribd.co m/John_Adam_St_Gang_ Occult_Theosophy History of the area: http://www.scribd.co m/doc/25462764/170-A delphi-Royal-Houses- Literary-H istory More here: http://www.lifeinthe mixtalk.com/?p=3305 ____________________ ____________________ ____________________ ________ New Schools Network Of the below names, eight out of the thirteen can be linked to the John Adam St Gang: * Sir Geoffrey Owen Sir Geoffrey is a former editor of the Financial Times and is a Senior Fellow at the London School of Economics. (Financial Times owned by Pearsons, located in Shell Mex House, London School of Economics founded at Adelphi, so hence both institutions of the John Adam St Gang). * Amanda Spielman Amanda Spielman is research and development director of the academy operator ARK Schools, where she is also responsible for strategic legal, governance and regulatory matters. She was recently a member of the Sykes review group commissioned by Michael Gove to review the school assessment system. She has an MA in Comparative Education from the Institute of Education. She is also a chartered accountant and spent over 15 years in private equity, mergers & acquisitions, and corporate strategy in the UK and the US for Kleinwort Benson, Mercer Management Consulting, and Nomura International Principal Finance Group. ARK located at 15 Adam St, hence of the John Adam St Gang * Sir Bruce Liddington Sir Bruce is the former Schools Commissioner for England, and is the Director General of EACT – an education foundation opening Academies across England. He is former head of Northampton School for Boys, whose performance he transformed, and held several posts in the Academies Directorate. * Theodore Agnew Theodore is Deputy Chairman of Jubilee Managing Agency. He is also Chairman of the Norfolk Community Foundation, and a trustee of Policy Exchange. Family publishes Whitaker's Almanac, buried under Cleopatra's Needle, between Shell-Mex and Adelphi House. (Agnew family details here: http://www.911forum. org.uk/board/viewtop ic.php?t=19345) * Barbara Harrison Barbara is the former chief executive of the Girls’ Day School Trust, one of the largest and most successful providers of independent education in the UK. She established the first independent sector Academy (The Belvedere) in Liverpool, closely followed by Birkenhead High. * Professor Julian Le Grand Professor Le Grand is Richard Titmuss Professor of Social Policy at the London School of Economics. He was one of Tony Blair’s key advisers and has written books on the use of market systems in public services – including education. London School of Economics founded at Adelphi, John Adam St Gang. * Baroness Sally Morgan Sally is an adviser to Ark Academies. She is a former Director of Government Relations at 10 Downing Street and senior adviser to Tony Blair. Originally a secondary school teacher Sally has a BA (Hons) in Geography from Durham University, PGCE from London University and MA in Comparative Education from the Institute of Education. ARK at 15 Adam st, John Adam St Gang. Morgan's husband John Lyon has been with Liberty (more on Liberty below). * Rev Tim Hastie-Smith Tim was head of Dean Close in Cheltenham for ten years, and is a former chair of the Headmasters’ and Headmistresses’ Conference. He has been a school governor for a wide range of schools, and currently runs Perrett Laver’s practice within schools and colleges. * Heath Monk Heath is Chief Executive of Future Leaders which develops the next generation of leaders for challenging schools. He is the former Deputy Schools Commissioner. He also spent six years as a secondary teacher of English and Drama, having read English Literature at Queen’s College, Oxford. Future Leaders located at 15 Adam St, London and funded by ARK, so hence of the John Adam St Gang * Geoffrey Davies Geoffrey is a former partner for Lewis Silkin, where he acts as a consultant. He has helped to establish around 60 Academies, working with many of the major sponsors. He is on the board of ULT – a multi-Academy sponsor. Geoffrey Davies Solicitors are located at 21 Buckingham Street, which runs off John Adam St, parallel to Adam St. Curiously, this firm has the same phone number as Lewis Silken, located at Windsor House, 50 Victoria St, London. Lewis Silken write the academy funding agreements, and are associated with Liberty, which links to the PIE, Paedophile Information Exchange. (article here: http://www.telegraph .co.uk/news/newstopi cs/politics/labour/4 949555/Har riet-Harman-under-at tack-over-bid-to-wat er-down-child-pornog raphy-law. html) * James Merriman James is CEO of the New York City Charter School Center, which serves as a resource and facilitator for new charter schools. He is the former director of the Charter Schools Institute of the State University of New York (SUNY), one of America’s largest authorisers of charter schools. * Ian Cleland Ian is the Chief Executive of the Ormiston Academies Trust, a multi-Academy sponsor. He has been a Visiting Professor at Wolverhampton University. He has extensive experience of education consultancy at a senior level with KPMG, DCSF and Local Authorities and is a former head. * Paul Marshall Paul Marshall is the co-founder and Chairman of Marshall Wace LLP. He is also a co-founder and trustee of ARK – a multi academy sponsor – and of the charity Every Child a Chance. He is chair of the Management Committee of the liberal think tank CentreForum. ARK at 15 Adam St,[/p][/quote]So your point is?[/p][/quote]That he can cut-and-paste more worthless drivel that no-one can be bothered polluting their minds with than anyone else. And if I lived in or near Blackburn, I would do anything and everything in my power to change that sad state of affairs. What an appalling state of affairs people have let come into being through apathy and bone-idleness. Now I'm not suggesting for one second you should let the fascist scum gain any unwarranted credence but come on, get yourselves together, organise and defeat this intolerable society you've let fester. Chris P Bacon
  • Score: 0

2:34pm Sun 8 Apr 12

sallythomson says...

Chris P Bacon wrote:
sallythomson wrote:
Lifeinthemix wrote: Pushing the free schools are this merry bunch, all connected to the Adelphi terrace, the seat of the corporate empire : New Schools Network claim to be an independent group, however they are most certainly not independent Adam street gang What we describe as the 'John Adam St Gang' are those insitutions located roughly between The Strand, Embankment, Craven Street and Lancaster Place (indicated on this map): http://www.scribd.co m/doc/28845356/Heron -House-FRM-Financial -Risk-Mana gement-Map Extensive list of institutions in the area: http://www.scribd.co m/John%20Adam%20St%2 0Gang:%20Crown%20Con trol List of occult institutions in the John Adam St Gang (many historic) http://www.scribd.co m/John_Adam_St_Gang_ Occult_Theosophy History of the area: http://www.scribd.co m/doc/25462764/170-A delphi-Royal-Houses- Literary-H istory More here: http://www.lifeinthe mixtalk.com/?p=3305 ____________________ ____________________ ____________________ ________ New Schools Network Of the below names, eight out of the thirteen can be linked to the John Adam St Gang: * Sir Geoffrey Owen Sir Geoffrey is a former editor of the Financial Times and is a Senior Fellow at the London School of Economics. (Financial Times owned by Pearsons, located in Shell Mex House, London School of Economics founded at Adelphi, so hence both institutions of the John Adam St Gang). * Amanda Spielman Amanda Spielman is research and development director of the academy operator ARK Schools, where she is also responsible for strategic legal, governance and regulatory matters. She was recently a member of the Sykes review group commissioned by Michael Gove to review the school assessment system. She has an MA in Comparative Education from the Institute of Education. She is also a chartered accountant and spent over 15 years in private equity, mergers & acquisitions, and corporate strategy in the UK and the US for Kleinwort Benson, Mercer Management Consulting, and Nomura International Principal Finance Group. ARK located at 15 Adam St, hence of the John Adam St Gang * Sir Bruce Liddington Sir Bruce is the former Schools Commissioner for England, and is the Director General of EACT – an education foundation opening Academies across England. He is former head of Northampton School for Boys, whose performance he transformed, and held several posts in the Academies Directorate. * Theodore Agnew Theodore is Deputy Chairman of Jubilee Managing Agency. He is also Chairman of the Norfolk Community Foundation, and a trustee of Policy Exchange. Family publishes Whitaker's Almanac, buried under Cleopatra's Needle, between Shell-Mex and Adelphi House. (Agnew family details here: http://www.911forum. org.uk/board/viewtop ic.php?t=19345) * Barbara Harrison Barbara is the former chief executive of the Girls’ Day School Trust, one of the largest and most successful providers of independent education in the UK. She established the first independent sector Academy (The Belvedere) in Liverpool, closely followed by Birkenhead High. * Professor Julian Le Grand Professor Le Grand is Richard Titmuss Professor of Social Policy at the London School of Economics. He was one of Tony Blair’s key advisers and has written books on the use of market systems in public services – including education. London School of Economics founded at Adelphi, John Adam St Gang. * Baroness Sally Morgan Sally is an adviser to Ark Academies. She is a former Director of Government Relations at 10 Downing Street and senior adviser to Tony Blair. Originally a secondary school teacher Sally has a BA (Hons) in Geography from Durham University, PGCE from London University and MA in Comparative Education from the Institute of Education. ARK at 15 Adam st, John Adam St Gang. Morgan's husband John Lyon has been with Liberty (more on Liberty below). * Rev Tim Hastie-Smith Tim was head of Dean Close in Cheltenham for ten years, and is a former chair of the Headmasters’ and Headmistresses’ Conference. He has been a school governor for a wide range of schools, and currently runs Perrett Laver’s practice within schools and colleges. * Heath Monk Heath is Chief Executive of Future Leaders which develops the next generation of leaders for challenging schools. He is the former Deputy Schools Commissioner. He also spent six years as a secondary teacher of English and Drama, having read English Literature at Queen’s College, Oxford. Future Leaders located at 15 Adam St, London and funded by ARK, so hence of the John Adam St Gang * Geoffrey Davies Geoffrey is a former partner for Lewis Silkin, where he acts as a consultant. He has helped to establish around 60 Academies, working with many of the major sponsors. He is on the board of ULT – a multi-Academy sponsor. Geoffrey Davies Solicitors are located at 21 Buckingham Street, which runs off John Adam St, parallel to Adam St. Curiously, this firm has the same phone number as Lewis Silken, located at Windsor House, 50 Victoria St, London. Lewis Silken write the academy funding agreements, and are associated with Liberty, which links to the PIE, Paedophile Information Exchange. (article here: http://www.telegraph .co.uk/news/newstopi cs/politics/labour/4 949555/Har riet-Harman-under-at tack-over-bid-to-wat er-down-child-pornog raphy-law. html) * James Merriman James is CEO of the New York City Charter School Center, which serves as a resource and facilitator for new charter schools. He is the former director of the Charter Schools Institute of the State University of New York (SUNY), one of America’s largest authorisers of charter schools. * Ian Cleland Ian is the Chief Executive of the Ormiston Academies Trust, a multi-Academy sponsor. He has been a Visiting Professor at Wolverhampton University. He has extensive experience of education consultancy at a senior level with KPMG, DCSF and Local Authorities and is a former head. * Paul Marshall Paul Marshall is the co-founder and Chairman of Marshall Wace LLP. He is also a co-founder and trustee of ARK – a multi academy sponsor – and of the charity Every Child a Chance. He is chair of the Management Committee of the liberal think tank CentreForum. ARK at 15 Adam St,
So your point is?
That he can cut-and-paste more worthless drivel that no-one can be bothered polluting their minds with than anyone else. And if I lived in or near Blackburn, I would do anything and everything in my power to change that sad state of affairs. What an appalling state of affairs people have let come into being through apathy and bone-idleness. Now I'm not suggesting for one second you should let the fascist scum gain any unwarranted credence but come on, get yourselves together, organise and defeat this intolerable society you've let fester.
Unfortunately, we have a council that has blindlessly pursued educational changes which have failed to deliver any real change. Take BSF for example, decisions were taken to increase the size of schools that has falling student numbers.
[quote][p][bold]Chris P Bacon[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]sallythomson[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Lifeinthemix[/bold] wrote: Pushing the free schools are this merry bunch, all connected to the Adelphi terrace, the seat of the corporate empire : New Schools Network claim to be an independent group, however they are most certainly not independent Adam street gang What we describe as the 'John Adam St Gang' are those insitutions located roughly between The Strand, Embankment, Craven Street and Lancaster Place (indicated on this map): http://www.scribd.co m/doc/28845356/Heron -House-FRM-Financial -Risk-Mana gement-Map Extensive list of institutions in the area: http://www.scribd.co m/John%20Adam%20St%2 0Gang:%20Crown%20Con trol List of occult institutions in the John Adam St Gang (many historic) http://www.scribd.co m/John_Adam_St_Gang_ Occult_Theosophy History of the area: http://www.scribd.co m/doc/25462764/170-A delphi-Royal-Houses- Literary-H istory More here: http://www.lifeinthe mixtalk.com/?p=3305 ____________________ ____________________ ____________________ ________ New Schools Network Of the below names, eight out of the thirteen can be linked to the John Adam St Gang: * Sir Geoffrey Owen Sir Geoffrey is a former editor of the Financial Times and is a Senior Fellow at the London School of Economics. (Financial Times owned by Pearsons, located in Shell Mex House, London School of Economics founded at Adelphi, so hence both institutions of the John Adam St Gang). * Amanda Spielman Amanda Spielman is research and development director of the academy operator ARK Schools, where she is also responsible for strategic legal, governance and regulatory matters. She was recently a member of the Sykes review group commissioned by Michael Gove to review the school assessment system. She has an MA in Comparative Education from the Institute of Education. She is also a chartered accountant and spent over 15 years in private equity, mergers & acquisitions, and corporate strategy in the UK and the US for Kleinwort Benson, Mercer Management Consulting, and Nomura International Principal Finance Group. ARK located at 15 Adam St, hence of the John Adam St Gang * Sir Bruce Liddington Sir Bruce is the former Schools Commissioner for England, and is the Director General of EACT – an education foundation opening Academies across England. He is former head of Northampton School for Boys, whose performance he transformed, and held several posts in the Academies Directorate. * Theodore Agnew Theodore is Deputy Chairman of Jubilee Managing Agency. He is also Chairman of the Norfolk Community Foundation, and a trustee of Policy Exchange. Family publishes Whitaker's Almanac, buried under Cleopatra's Needle, between Shell-Mex and Adelphi House. (Agnew family details here: http://www.911forum. org.uk/board/viewtop ic.php?t=19345) * Barbara Harrison Barbara is the former chief executive of the Girls’ Day School Trust, one of the largest and most successful providers of independent education in the UK. She established the first independent sector Academy (The Belvedere) in Liverpool, closely followed by Birkenhead High. * Professor Julian Le Grand Professor Le Grand is Richard Titmuss Professor of Social Policy at the London School of Economics. He was one of Tony Blair’s key advisers and has written books on the use of market systems in public services – including education. London School of Economics founded at Adelphi, John Adam St Gang. * Baroness Sally Morgan Sally is an adviser to Ark Academies. She is a former Director of Government Relations at 10 Downing Street and senior adviser to Tony Blair. Originally a secondary school teacher Sally has a BA (Hons) in Geography from Durham University, PGCE from London University and MA in Comparative Education from the Institute of Education. ARK at 15 Adam st, John Adam St Gang. Morgan's husband John Lyon has been with Liberty (more on Liberty below). * Rev Tim Hastie-Smith Tim was head of Dean Close in Cheltenham for ten years, and is a former chair of the Headmasters’ and Headmistresses’ Conference. He has been a school governor for a wide range of schools, and currently runs Perrett Laver’s practice within schools and colleges. * Heath Monk Heath is Chief Executive of Future Leaders which develops the next generation of leaders for challenging schools. He is the former Deputy Schools Commissioner. He also spent six years as a secondary teacher of English and Drama, having read English Literature at Queen’s College, Oxford. Future Leaders located at 15 Adam St, London and funded by ARK, so hence of the John Adam St Gang * Geoffrey Davies Geoffrey is a former partner for Lewis Silkin, where he acts as a consultant. He has helped to establish around 60 Academies, working with many of the major sponsors. He is on the board of ULT – a multi-Academy sponsor. Geoffrey Davies Solicitors are located at 21 Buckingham Street, which runs off John Adam St, parallel to Adam St. Curiously, this firm has the same phone number as Lewis Silken, located at Windsor House, 50 Victoria St, London. Lewis Silken write the academy funding agreements, and are associated with Liberty, which links to the PIE, Paedophile Information Exchange. (article here: http://www.telegraph .co.uk/news/newstopi cs/politics/labour/4 949555/Har riet-Harman-under-at tack-over-bid-to-wat er-down-child-pornog raphy-law. html) * James Merriman James is CEO of the New York City Charter School Center, which serves as a resource and facilitator for new charter schools. He is the former director of the Charter Schools Institute of the State University of New York (SUNY), one of America’s largest authorisers of charter schools. * Ian Cleland Ian is the Chief Executive of the Ormiston Academies Trust, a multi-Academy sponsor. He has been a Visiting Professor at Wolverhampton University. He has extensive experience of education consultancy at a senior level with KPMG, DCSF and Local Authorities and is a former head. * Paul Marshall Paul Marshall is the co-founder and Chairman of Marshall Wace LLP. He is also a co-founder and trustee of ARK – a multi academy sponsor – and of the charity Every Child a Chance. He is chair of the Management Committee of the liberal think tank CentreForum. ARK at 15 Adam St,[/p][/quote]So your point is?[/p][/quote]That he can cut-and-paste more worthless drivel that no-one can be bothered polluting their minds with than anyone else. And if I lived in or near Blackburn, I would do anything and everything in my power to change that sad state of affairs. What an appalling state of affairs people have let come into being through apathy and bone-idleness. Now I'm not suggesting for one second you should let the fascist scum gain any unwarranted credence but come on, get yourselves together, organise and defeat this intolerable society you've let fester.[/p][/quote]Unfortunately, we have a council that has blindlessly pursued educational changes which have failed to deliver any real change. Take BSF for example, decisions were taken to increase the size of schools that has falling student numbers. sallythomson
  • Score: 0

3:06pm Sun 8 Apr 12

DGower says...

sallythomson wrote:
Chris P Bacon wrote:
sallythomson wrote:
Lifeinthemix wrote: Pushing the free schools are this merry bunch, all connected to the Adelphi terrace, the seat of the corporate empire : New Schools Network claim to be an independent group, however they are most certainly not independent Adam street gang What we describe as the 'John Adam St Gang' are those insitutions located roughly between The Strand, Embankment, Craven Street and Lancaster Place (indicated on this map): http://www.scribd.co m/doc/28845356/Heron -House-FRM-Financial -Risk-Mana gement-Map Extensive list of institutions in the area: http://www.scribd.co m/John%20Adam%20St%2 0Gang:%20Crown%20Con trol List of occult institutions in the John Adam St Gang (many historic) http://www.scribd.co m/John_Adam_St_Gang_ Occult_Theosophy History of the area: http://www.scribd.co m/doc/25462764/170-A delphi-Royal-Houses- Literary-H istory More here: http://www.lifeinthe mixtalk.com/?p=3305 ____________________ ____________________ ____________________ ________ New Schools Network Of the below names, eight out of the thirteen can be linked to the John Adam St Gang: * Sir Geoffrey Owen Sir Geoffrey is a former editor of the Financial Times and is a Senior Fellow at the London School of Economics. (Financial Times owned by Pearsons, located in Shell Mex House, London School of Economics founded at Adelphi, so hence both institutions of the John Adam St Gang). * Amanda Spielman Amanda Spielman is research and development director of the academy operator ARK Schools, where she is also responsible for strategic legal, governance and regulatory matters. She was recently a member of the Sykes review group commissioned by Michael Gove to review the school assessment system. She has an MA in Comparative Education from the Institute of Education. She is also a chartered accountant and spent over 15 years in private equity, mergers & acquisitions, and corporate strategy in the UK and the US for Kleinwort Benson, Mercer Management Consulting, and Nomura International Principal Finance Group. ARK located at 15 Adam St, hence of the John Adam St Gang * Sir Bruce Liddington Sir Bruce is the former Schools Commissioner for England, and is the Director General of EACT – an education foundation opening Academies across England. He is former head of Northampton School for Boys, whose performance he transformed, and held several posts in the Academies Directorate. * Theodore Agnew Theodore is Deputy Chairman of Jubilee Managing Agency. He is also Chairman of the Norfolk Community Foundation, and a trustee of Policy Exchange. Family publishes Whitaker's Almanac, buried under Cleopatra's Needle, between Shell-Mex and Adelphi House. (Agnew family details here: http://www.911forum. org.uk/board/viewtop ic.php?t=19345) * Barbara Harrison Barbara is the former chief executive of the Girls’ Day School Trust, one of the largest and most successful providers of independent education in the UK. She established the first independent sector Academy (The Belvedere) in Liverpool, closely followed by Birkenhead High. * Professor Julian Le Grand Professor Le Grand is Richard Titmuss Professor of Social Policy at the London School of Economics. He was one of Tony Blair’s key advisers and has written books on the use of market systems in public services – including education. London School of Economics founded at Adelphi, John Adam St Gang. * Baroness Sally Morgan Sally is an adviser to Ark Academies. She is a former Director of Government Relations at 10 Downing Street and senior adviser to Tony Blair. Originally a secondary school teacher Sally has a BA (Hons) in Geography from Durham University, PGCE from London University and MA in Comparative Education from the Institute of Education. ARK at 15 Adam st, John Adam St Gang. Morgan's husband John Lyon has been with Liberty (more on Liberty below). * Rev Tim Hastie-Smith Tim was head of Dean Close in Cheltenham for ten years, and is a former chair of the Headmasters’ and Headmistresses’ Conference. He has been a school governor for a wide range of schools, and currently runs Perrett Laver’s practice within schools and colleges. * Heath Monk Heath is Chief Executive of Future Leaders which develops the next generation of leaders for challenging schools. He is the former Deputy Schools Commissioner. He also spent six years as a secondary teacher of English and Drama, having read English Literature at Queen’s College, Oxford. Future Leaders located at 15 Adam St, London and funded by ARK, so hence of the John Adam St Gang * Geoffrey Davies Geoffrey is a former partner for Lewis Silkin, where he acts as a consultant. He has helped to establish around 60 Academies, working with many of the major sponsors. He is on the board of ULT – a multi-Academy sponsor. Geoffrey Davies Solicitors are located at 21 Buckingham Street, which runs off John Adam St, parallel to Adam St. Curiously, this firm has the same phone number as Lewis Silken, located at Windsor House, 50 Victoria St, London. Lewis Silken write the academy funding agreements, and are associated with Liberty, which links to the PIE, Paedophile Information Exchange. (article here: http://www.telegraph .co.uk/news/newstopi cs/politics/labour/4 949555/Har riet-Harman-under-at tack-over-bid-to-wat er-down-child-pornog raphy-law. html) * James Merriman James is CEO of the New York City Charter School Center, which serves as a resource and facilitator for new charter schools. He is the former director of the Charter Schools Institute of the State University of New York (SUNY), one of America’s largest authorisers of charter schools. * Ian Cleland Ian is the Chief Executive of the Ormiston Academies Trust, a multi-Academy sponsor. He has been a Visiting Professor at Wolverhampton University. He has extensive experience of education consultancy at a senior level with KPMG, DCSF and Local Authorities and is a former head. * Paul Marshall Paul Marshall is the co-founder and Chairman of Marshall Wace LLP. He is also a co-founder and trustee of ARK – a multi academy sponsor – and of the charity Every Child a Chance. He is chair of the Management Committee of the liberal think tank CentreForum. ARK at 15 Adam St,
So your point is?
That he can cut-and-paste more worthless drivel that no-one can be bothered polluting their minds with than anyone else. And if I lived in or near Blackburn, I would do anything and everything in my power to change that sad state of affairs. What an appalling state of affairs people have let come into being through apathy and bone-idleness. Now I'm not suggesting for one second you should let the fascist scum gain any unwarranted credence but come on, get yourselves together, organise and defeat this intolerable society you've let fester.
Unfortunately, we have a council that has blindlessly pursued educational changes which have failed to deliver any real change. Take BSF for example, decisions were taken to increase the size of schools that has falling student numbers.
Add to that closing a perfectly good school in Beardwood High School and 'reward' Blakewater who consistently underperforms with a fancy multi million pound investment. Cllr Bateson should remember that fancy buildings alone don't raise educational underachievement. Great "strategic planning" indeed Cllr Bateson.
[quote][p][bold]sallythomson[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Chris P Bacon[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]sallythomson[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Lifeinthemix[/bold] wrote: Pushing the free schools are this merry bunch, all connected to the Adelphi terrace, the seat of the corporate empire : New Schools Network claim to be an independent group, however they are most certainly not independent Adam street gang What we describe as the 'John Adam St Gang' are those insitutions located roughly between The Strand, Embankment, Craven Street and Lancaster Place (indicated on this map): http://www.scribd.co m/doc/28845356/Heron -House-FRM-Financial -Risk-Mana gement-Map Extensive list of institutions in the area: http://www.scribd.co m/John%20Adam%20St%2 0Gang:%20Crown%20Con trol List of occult institutions in the John Adam St Gang (many historic) http://www.scribd.co m/John_Adam_St_Gang_ Occult_Theosophy History of the area: http://www.scribd.co m/doc/25462764/170-A delphi-Royal-Houses- Literary-H istory More here: http://www.lifeinthe mixtalk.com/?p=3305 ____________________ ____________________ ____________________ ________ New Schools Network Of the below names, eight out of the thirteen can be linked to the John Adam St Gang: * Sir Geoffrey Owen Sir Geoffrey is a former editor of the Financial Times and is a Senior Fellow at the London School of Economics. (Financial Times owned by Pearsons, located in Shell Mex House, London School of Economics founded at Adelphi, so hence both institutions of the John Adam St Gang). * Amanda Spielman Amanda Spielman is research and development director of the academy operator ARK Schools, where she is also responsible for strategic legal, governance and regulatory matters. She was recently a member of the Sykes review group commissioned by Michael Gove to review the school assessment system. She has an MA in Comparative Education from the Institute of Education. She is also a chartered accountant and spent over 15 years in private equity, mergers & acquisitions, and corporate strategy in the UK and the US for Kleinwort Benson, Mercer Management Consulting, and Nomura International Principal Finance Group. ARK located at 15 Adam St, hence of the John Adam St Gang * Sir Bruce Liddington Sir Bruce is the former Schools Commissioner for England, and is the Director General of EACT – an education foundation opening Academies across England. He is former head of Northampton School for Boys, whose performance he transformed, and held several posts in the Academies Directorate. * Theodore Agnew Theodore is Deputy Chairman of Jubilee Managing Agency. He is also Chairman of the Norfolk Community Foundation, and a trustee of Policy Exchange. Family publishes Whitaker's Almanac, buried under Cleopatra's Needle, between Shell-Mex and Adelphi House. (Agnew family details here: http://www.911forum. org.uk/board/viewtop ic.php?t=19345) * Barbara Harrison Barbara is the former chief executive of the Girls’ Day School Trust, one of the largest and most successful providers of independent education in the UK. She established the first independent sector Academy (The Belvedere) in Liverpool, closely followed by Birkenhead High. * Professor Julian Le Grand Professor Le Grand is Richard Titmuss Professor of Social Policy at the London School of Economics. He was one of Tony Blair’s key advisers and has written books on the use of market systems in public services – including education. London School of Economics founded at Adelphi, John Adam St Gang. * Baroness Sally Morgan Sally is an adviser to Ark Academies. She is a former Director of Government Relations at 10 Downing Street and senior adviser to Tony Blair. Originally a secondary school teacher Sally has a BA (Hons) in Geography from Durham University, PGCE from London University and MA in Comparative Education from the Institute of Education. ARK at 15 Adam st, John Adam St Gang. Morgan's husband John Lyon has been with Liberty (more on Liberty below). * Rev Tim Hastie-Smith Tim was head of Dean Close in Cheltenham for ten years, and is a former chair of the Headmasters’ and Headmistresses’ Conference. He has been a school governor for a wide range of schools, and currently runs Perrett Laver’s practice within schools and colleges. * Heath Monk Heath is Chief Executive of Future Leaders which develops the next generation of leaders for challenging schools. He is the former Deputy Schools Commissioner. He also spent six years as a secondary teacher of English and Drama, having read English Literature at Queen’s College, Oxford. Future Leaders located at 15 Adam St, London and funded by ARK, so hence of the John Adam St Gang * Geoffrey Davies Geoffrey is a former partner for Lewis Silkin, where he acts as a consultant. He has helped to establish around 60 Academies, working with many of the major sponsors. He is on the board of ULT – a multi-Academy sponsor. Geoffrey Davies Solicitors are located at 21 Buckingham Street, which runs off John Adam St, parallel to Adam St. Curiously, this firm has the same phone number as Lewis Silken, located at Windsor House, 50 Victoria St, London. Lewis Silken write the academy funding agreements, and are associated with Liberty, which links to the PIE, Paedophile Information Exchange. (article here: http://www.telegraph .co.uk/news/newstopi cs/politics/labour/4 949555/Har riet-Harman-under-at tack-over-bid-to-wat er-down-child-pornog raphy-law. html) * James Merriman James is CEO of the New York City Charter School Center, which serves as a resource and facilitator for new charter schools. He is the former director of the Charter Schools Institute of the State University of New York (SUNY), one of America’s largest authorisers of charter schools. * Ian Cleland Ian is the Chief Executive of the Ormiston Academies Trust, a multi-Academy sponsor. He has been a Visiting Professor at Wolverhampton University. He has extensive experience of education consultancy at a senior level with KPMG, DCSF and Local Authorities and is a former head. * Paul Marshall Paul Marshall is the co-founder and Chairman of Marshall Wace LLP. He is also a co-founder and trustee of ARK – a multi academy sponsor – and of the charity Every Child a Chance. He is chair of the Management Committee of the liberal think tank CentreForum. ARK at 15 Adam St,[/p][/quote]So your point is?[/p][/quote]That he can cut-and-paste more worthless drivel that no-one can be bothered polluting their minds with than anyone else. And if I lived in or near Blackburn, I would do anything and everything in my power to change that sad state of affairs. What an appalling state of affairs people have let come into being through apathy and bone-idleness. Now I'm not suggesting for one second you should let the fascist scum gain any unwarranted credence but come on, get yourselves together, organise and defeat this intolerable society you've let fester.[/p][/quote]Unfortunately, we have a council that has blindlessly pursued educational changes which have failed to deliver any real change. Take BSF for example, decisions were taken to increase the size of schools that has falling student numbers.[/p][/quote]Add to that closing a perfectly good school in Beardwood High School and 'reward' Blakewater who consistently underperforms with a fancy multi million pound investment. Cllr Bateson should remember that fancy buildings alone don't raise educational underachievement. Great "strategic planning" indeed Cllr Bateson. DGower
  • Score: 0

3:10pm Sun 8 Apr 12

Chris P Bacon says...

You, the good people need to stand up and oppose this lest your town becomes widely known and ridiculed as 'the sink of all evil'. Seriously, if this isn't a clarion call, apportion the blame for what follows on no-one but yourselves.
You, the good people need to stand up and oppose this lest your town becomes widely known and ridiculed as 'the sink of all evil'. Seriously, if this isn't a clarion call, apportion the blame for what follows on no-one but yourselves. Chris P Bacon
  • Score: 0

4:38pm Sun 8 Apr 12

Question More says...

Lifeinthemix wrote:
Pushing the free schools are this merry bunch, all connected to the Adelphi terrace, the seat of the corporate empire :

New Schools Network claim to be an independent group, however they are most certainly not independent Adam street gang

What we describe as the 'John Adam St Gang' are those insitutions located roughly between The Strand, Embankment, Craven Street and Lancaster Place (indicated on this map):

http://www.scribd.co

m/doc/28845356/Heron

-House-FRM-Financial

-Risk-Mana gement-Map

Extensive list of institutions in the area: http://www.scribd.co

m/John%20Adam%20St%2

0Gang:%20Crown%20Con

trol

List of occult institutions in the John Adam St Gang (many historic)
http://www.scribd.co

m/John_Adam_St_Gang_

Occult_Theosophy

History of the area: http://www.scribd.co

m/doc/25462764/170-A

delphi-Royal-Houses-

Literary-H istory

More here: http://www.lifeinthe

mixtalk.com/?p=3305

____________________

____________________

____________________

________

New Schools Network

Of the below names, eight out of the thirteen can be linked to the John Adam St Gang:

* Sir Geoffrey Owen

Sir Geoffrey is a former editor of the Financial Times and is a Senior Fellow at the London School of Economics.

(Financial Times owned by Pearsons, located in Shell Mex House, London School of Economics founded at Adelphi, so hence both institutions of the John Adam St Gang).

* Amanda Spielman

Amanda Spielman is research and development director of the academy operator ARK Schools, where she is also responsible for strategic legal, governance and regulatory matters. She was recently a member of the Sykes review group commissioned by Michael Gove to review the school assessment system. She has an MA in Comparative Education from the Institute of Education. She is also a chartered accountant and spent over 15 years in private equity, mergers & acquisitions, and corporate strategy in the UK and the US for Kleinwort Benson, Mercer Management Consulting, and Nomura International Principal Finance Group.

ARK located at 15 Adam St, hence of the John Adam St Gang

* Sir Bruce Liddington

Sir Bruce is the former Schools Commissioner for England, and is the Director General of EACT – an education foundation opening Academies across England. He is former head of Northampton School for Boys, whose performance he transformed, and held several posts in the Academies Directorate.

* Theodore Agnew

Theodore is Deputy Chairman of Jubilee Managing Agency. He is also Chairman of the Norfolk Community Foundation, and a trustee of Policy Exchange.

Family publishes Whitaker's Almanac, buried under Cleopatra's Needle, between Shell-Mex and Adelphi House. (Agnew family details here: http://www.911forum.

org.uk/board/viewtop

ic.php?t=19345)

* Barbara Harrison

Barbara is the former chief executive of the Girls’ Day School Trust, one of the largest and most successful providers of independent education in the UK. She established the first independent sector Academy (The Belvedere) in Liverpool, closely followed by Birkenhead High.


* Professor Julian Le Grand

Professor Le Grand is Richard Titmuss Professor of Social Policy at the London School of Economics. He was one of Tony Blair’s key advisers and has written books on the use of market systems in public services – including education.

London School of Economics founded at Adelphi, John Adam St Gang.


* Baroness Sally Morgan

Sally is an adviser to Ark Academies. She is a former Director of Government Relations at 10 Downing Street and senior adviser to Tony Blair. Originally a secondary school teacher Sally has a BA (Hons) in Geography from Durham University, PGCE from London University and MA in Comparative Education from the Institute of Education.

ARK at 15 Adam st, John Adam St Gang.

Morgan's husband John Lyon has been with Liberty (more on Liberty below).

* Rev Tim Hastie-Smith

Tim was head of Dean Close in Cheltenham for ten years, and is a former chair of the Headmasters’ and Headmistresses’ Conference. He has been a school governor for a wide range of schools, and currently runs Perrett Laver’s practice within schools and colleges.

* Heath Monk

Heath is Chief Executive of Future Leaders which develops the next generation of leaders for challenging schools. He is the former Deputy Schools Commissioner. He also spent six years as a secondary teacher of English and Drama, having read English Literature at Queen’s College, Oxford.

Future Leaders located at 15 Adam St, London and funded by ARK, so hence of the John Adam St Gang

* Geoffrey Davies

Geoffrey is a former partner for Lewis Silkin, where he acts as a consultant. He has helped to establish around 60 Academies, working with many of the major sponsors. He is on the board of ULT – a multi-Academy sponsor.

Geoffrey Davies Solicitors are located at 21 Buckingham Street, which runs off John Adam St, parallel to Adam St. Curiously, this firm has the same phone number as Lewis Silken, located at Windsor House, 50 Victoria St, London.

Lewis Silken write the academy funding agreements, and are associated with Liberty, which links to the PIE, Paedophile Information Exchange.

(article here: http://www.telegraph

.co.uk/news/newstopi

cs/politics/labour/4

949555/Har riet-Harman-under-at

tack-over-bid-to-wat

er-down-child-pornog

raphy-law. html)

* James Merriman

James is CEO of the New York City Charter School Center, which serves as a resource and facilitator for new charter schools. He is the former director of the Charter Schools Institute of the State University of New York (SUNY), one of America’s largest authorisers of charter schools.

* Ian Cleland

Ian is the Chief Executive of the Ormiston Academies Trust, a multi-Academy sponsor. He has been a Visiting Professor at Wolverhampton University. He has extensive experience of education consultancy at a senior level with KPMG, DCSF and Local Authorities and is a former head.

* Paul Marshall

Paul Marshall is the co-founder and Chairman of Marshall Wace LLP. He is also a co-founder and trustee of ARK – a multi academy sponsor – and of the charity Every Child a Chance. He is chair of the Management Committee of the liberal think tank CentreForum.

ARK at 15 Adam St,
I am with you on this & the way our society is going & who is behind it .. could do with contacting you if poss ?

As for the school ... it`s all going to end in tears & segregation is order of the day
[quote][p][bold]Lifeinthemix[/bold] wrote: Pushing the free schools are this merry bunch, all connected to the Adelphi terrace, the seat of the corporate empire : New Schools Network claim to be an independent group, however they are most certainly not independent Adam street gang What we describe as the 'John Adam St Gang' are those insitutions located roughly between The Strand, Embankment, Craven Street and Lancaster Place (indicated on this map): http://www.scribd.co m/doc/28845356/Heron -House-FRM-Financial -Risk-Mana gement-Map Extensive list of institutions in the area: http://www.scribd.co m/John%20Adam%20St%2 0Gang:%20Crown%20Con trol List of occult institutions in the John Adam St Gang (many historic) http://www.scribd.co m/John_Adam_St_Gang_ Occult_Theosophy History of the area: http://www.scribd.co m/doc/25462764/170-A delphi-Royal-Houses- Literary-H istory More here: http://www.lifeinthe mixtalk.com/?p=3305 ____________________ ____________________ ____________________ ________ New Schools Network Of the below names, eight out of the thirteen can be linked to the John Adam St Gang: * Sir Geoffrey Owen Sir Geoffrey is a former editor of the Financial Times and is a Senior Fellow at the London School of Economics. (Financial Times owned by Pearsons, located in Shell Mex House, London School of Economics founded at Adelphi, so hence both institutions of the John Adam St Gang). * Amanda Spielman Amanda Spielman is research and development director of the academy operator ARK Schools, where she is also responsible for strategic legal, governance and regulatory matters. She was recently a member of the Sykes review group commissioned by Michael Gove to review the school assessment system. She has an MA in Comparative Education from the Institute of Education. She is also a chartered accountant and spent over 15 years in private equity, mergers & acquisitions, and corporate strategy in the UK and the US for Kleinwort Benson, Mercer Management Consulting, and Nomura International Principal Finance Group. ARK located at 15 Adam St, hence of the John Adam St Gang * Sir Bruce Liddington Sir Bruce is the former Schools Commissioner for England, and is the Director General of EACT – an education foundation opening Academies across England. He is former head of Northampton School for Boys, whose performance he transformed, and held several posts in the Academies Directorate. * Theodore Agnew Theodore is Deputy Chairman of Jubilee Managing Agency. He is also Chairman of the Norfolk Community Foundation, and a trustee of Policy Exchange. Family publishes Whitaker's Almanac, buried under Cleopatra's Needle, between Shell-Mex and Adelphi House. (Agnew family details here: http://www.911forum. org.uk/board/viewtop ic.php?t=19345) * Barbara Harrison Barbara is the former chief executive of the Girls’ Day School Trust, one of the largest and most successful providers of independent education in the UK. She established the first independent sector Academy (The Belvedere) in Liverpool, closely followed by Birkenhead High. * Professor Julian Le Grand Professor Le Grand is Richard Titmuss Professor of Social Policy at the London School of Economics. He was one of Tony Blair’s key advisers and has written books on the use of market systems in public services – including education. London School of Economics founded at Adelphi, John Adam St Gang. * Baroness Sally Morgan Sally is an adviser to Ark Academies. She is a former Director of Government Relations at 10 Downing Street and senior adviser to Tony Blair. Originally a secondary school teacher Sally has a BA (Hons) in Geography from Durham University, PGCE from London University and MA in Comparative Education from the Institute of Education. ARK at 15 Adam st, John Adam St Gang. Morgan's husband John Lyon has been with Liberty (more on Liberty below). * Rev Tim Hastie-Smith Tim was head of Dean Close in Cheltenham for ten years, and is a former chair of the Headmasters’ and Headmistresses’ Conference. He has been a school governor for a wide range of schools, and currently runs Perrett Laver’s practice within schools and colleges. * Heath Monk Heath is Chief Executive of Future Leaders which develops the next generation of leaders for challenging schools. He is the former Deputy Schools Commissioner. He also spent six years as a secondary teacher of English and Drama, having read English Literature at Queen’s College, Oxford. Future Leaders located at 15 Adam St, London and funded by ARK, so hence of the John Adam St Gang * Geoffrey Davies Geoffrey is a former partner for Lewis Silkin, where he acts as a consultant. He has helped to establish around 60 Academies, working with many of the major sponsors. He is on the board of ULT – a multi-Academy sponsor. Geoffrey Davies Solicitors are located at 21 Buckingham Street, which runs off John Adam St, parallel to Adam St. Curiously, this firm has the same phone number as Lewis Silken, located at Windsor House, 50 Victoria St, London. Lewis Silken write the academy funding agreements, and are associated with Liberty, which links to the PIE, Paedophile Information Exchange. (article here: http://www.telegraph .co.uk/news/newstopi cs/politics/labour/4 949555/Har riet-Harman-under-at tack-over-bid-to-wat er-down-child-pornog raphy-law. html) * James Merriman James is CEO of the New York City Charter School Center, which serves as a resource and facilitator for new charter schools. He is the former director of the Charter Schools Institute of the State University of New York (SUNY), one of America’s largest authorisers of charter schools. * Ian Cleland Ian is the Chief Executive of the Ormiston Academies Trust, a multi-Academy sponsor. He has been a Visiting Professor at Wolverhampton University. He has extensive experience of education consultancy at a senior level with KPMG, DCSF and Local Authorities and is a former head. * Paul Marshall Paul Marshall is the co-founder and Chairman of Marshall Wace LLP. He is also a co-founder and trustee of ARK – a multi academy sponsor – and of the charity Every Child a Chance. He is chair of the Management Committee of the liberal think tank CentreForum. ARK at 15 Adam St,[/p][/quote]I am with you on this & the way our society is going & who is behind it .. could do with contacting you if poss ? As for the school ... it`s all going to end in tears & segregation is order of the day Question More
  • Score: 0

5:43pm Sun 8 Apr 12

Lifeinthemix says...

lifeinthemix22@yahoo
.com
lifeinthemix22@yahoo .com Lifeinthemix
  • Score: 0

5:51pm Sun 8 Apr 12

sallythomson says...

Question More wrote:
Lifeinthemix wrote: Pushing the free schools are this merry bunch, all connected to the Adelphi terrace, the seat of the corporate empire : New Schools Network claim to be an independent group, however they are most certainly not independent Adam street gang What we describe as the 'John Adam St Gang' are those insitutions located roughly between The Strand, Embankment, Craven Street and Lancaster Place (indicated on this map): http://www.scribd.co m/doc/28845356/Heron -House-FRM-Financial -Risk-Mana gement-Map Extensive list of institutions in the area: http://www.scribd.co m/John%20Adam%20St%2 0Gang:%20Crown%20Con trol List of occult institutions in the John Adam St Gang (many historic) http://www.scribd.co m/John_Adam_St_Gang_ Occult_Theosophy History of the area: http://www.scribd.co m/doc/25462764/170-A delphi-Royal-Houses- Literary-H istory More here: http://www.lifeinthe mixtalk.com/?p=3305 ____________________ ____________________ ____________________ ________ New Schools Network Of the below names, eight out of the thirteen can be linked to the John Adam St Gang: * Sir Geoffrey Owen Sir Geoffrey is a former editor of the Financial Times and is a Senior Fellow at the London School of Economics. (Financial Times owned by Pearsons, located in Shell Mex House, London School of Economics founded at Adelphi, so hence both institutions of the John Adam St Gang). * Amanda Spielman Amanda Spielman is research and development director of the academy operator ARK Schools, where she is also responsible for strategic legal, governance and regulatory matters. She was recently a member of the Sykes review group commissioned by Michael Gove to review the school assessment system. She has an MA in Comparative Education from the Institute of Education. She is also a chartered accountant and spent over 15 years in private equity, mergers & acquisitions, and corporate strategy in the UK and the US for Kleinwort Benson, Mercer Management Consulting, and Nomura International Principal Finance Group. ARK located at 15 Adam St, hence of the John Adam St Gang * Sir Bruce Liddington Sir Bruce is the former Schools Commissioner for England, and is the Director General of EACT – an education foundation opening Academies across England. He is former head of Northampton School for Boys, whose performance he transformed, and held several posts in the Academies Directorate. * Theodore Agnew Theodore is Deputy Chairman of Jubilee Managing Agency. He is also Chairman of the Norfolk Community Foundation, and a trustee of Policy Exchange. Family publishes Whitaker's Almanac, buried under Cleopatra's Needle, between Shell-Mex and Adelphi House. (Agnew family details here: http://www.911forum. org.uk/board/viewtop ic.php?t=19345) * Barbara Harrison Barbara is the former chief executive of the Girls’ Day School Trust, one of the largest and most successful providers of independent education in the UK. She established the first independent sector Academy (The Belvedere) in Liverpool, closely followed by Birkenhead High. * Professor Julian Le Grand Professor Le Grand is Richard Titmuss Professor of Social Policy at the London School of Economics. He was one of Tony Blair’s key advisers and has written books on the use of market systems in public services – including education. London School of Economics founded at Adelphi, John Adam St Gang. * Baroness Sally Morgan Sally is an adviser to Ark Academies. She is a former Director of Government Relations at 10 Downing Street and senior adviser to Tony Blair. Originally a secondary school teacher Sally has a BA (Hons) in Geography from Durham University, PGCE from London University and MA in Comparative Education from the Institute of Education. ARK at 15 Adam st, John Adam St Gang. Morgan's husband John Lyon has been with Liberty (more on Liberty below). * Rev Tim Hastie-Smith Tim was head of Dean Close in Cheltenham for ten years, and is a former chair of the Headmasters’ and Headmistresses’ Conference. He has been a school governor for a wide range of schools, and currently runs Perrett Laver’s practice within schools and colleges. * Heath Monk Heath is Chief Executive of Future Leaders which develops the next generation of leaders for challenging schools. He is the former Deputy Schools Commissioner. He also spent six years as a secondary teacher of English and Drama, having read English Literature at Queen’s College, Oxford. Future Leaders located at 15 Adam St, London and funded by ARK, so hence of the John Adam St Gang * Geoffrey Davies Geoffrey is a former partner for Lewis Silkin, where he acts as a consultant. He has helped to establish around 60 Academies, working with many of the major sponsors. He is on the board of ULT – a multi-Academy sponsor. Geoffrey Davies Solicitors are located at 21 Buckingham Street, which runs off John Adam St, parallel to Adam St. Curiously, this firm has the same phone number as Lewis Silken, located at Windsor House, 50 Victoria St, London. Lewis Silken write the academy funding agreements, and are associated with Liberty, which links to the PIE, Paedophile Information Exchange. (article here: http://www.telegraph .co.uk/news/newstopi cs/politics/labour/4 949555/Har riet-Harman-under-at tack-over-bid-to-wat er-down-child-pornog raphy-law. html) * James Merriman James is CEO of the New York City Charter School Center, which serves as a resource and facilitator for new charter schools. He is the former director of the Charter Schools Institute of the State University of New York (SUNY), one of America’s largest authorisers of charter schools. * Ian Cleland Ian is the Chief Executive of the Ormiston Academies Trust, a multi-Academy sponsor. He has been a Visiting Professor at Wolverhampton University. He has extensive experience of education consultancy at a senior level with KPMG, DCSF and Local Authorities and is a former head. * Paul Marshall Paul Marshall is the co-founder and Chairman of Marshall Wace LLP. He is also a co-founder and trustee of ARK – a multi academy sponsor – and of the charity Every Child a Chance. He is chair of the Management Committee of the liberal think tank CentreForum. ARK at 15 Adam St,
I am with you on this & the way our society is going & who is behind it .. could do with contacting you if poss ? As for the school ... it`s all going to end in tears & segregation is order of the day
We already have segregation! Blackburn with Darwen's primary schools are amongst the worst performing in the North West. Nothing less than a step change is required.
[quote][p][bold]Question More[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Lifeinthemix[/bold] wrote: Pushing the free schools are this merry bunch, all connected to the Adelphi terrace, the seat of the corporate empire : New Schools Network claim to be an independent group, however they are most certainly not independent Adam street gang What we describe as the 'John Adam St Gang' are those insitutions located roughly between The Strand, Embankment, Craven Street and Lancaster Place (indicated on this map): http://www.scribd.co m/doc/28845356/Heron -House-FRM-Financial -Risk-Mana gement-Map Extensive list of institutions in the area: http://www.scribd.co m/John%20Adam%20St%2 0Gang:%20Crown%20Con trol List of occult institutions in the John Adam St Gang (many historic) http://www.scribd.co m/John_Adam_St_Gang_ Occult_Theosophy History of the area: http://www.scribd.co m/doc/25462764/170-A delphi-Royal-Houses- Literary-H istory More here: http://www.lifeinthe mixtalk.com/?p=3305 ____________________ ____________________ ____________________ ________ New Schools Network Of the below names, eight out of the thirteen can be linked to the John Adam St Gang: * Sir Geoffrey Owen Sir Geoffrey is a former editor of the Financial Times and is a Senior Fellow at the London School of Economics. (Financial Times owned by Pearsons, located in Shell Mex House, London School of Economics founded at Adelphi, so hence both institutions of the John Adam St Gang). * Amanda Spielman Amanda Spielman is research and development director of the academy operator ARK Schools, where she is also responsible for strategic legal, governance and regulatory matters. She was recently a member of the Sykes review group commissioned by Michael Gove to review the school assessment system. She has an MA in Comparative Education from the Institute of Education. She is also a chartered accountant and spent over 15 years in private equity, mergers & acquisitions, and corporate strategy in the UK and the US for Kleinwort Benson, Mercer Management Consulting, and Nomura International Principal Finance Group. ARK located at 15 Adam St, hence of the John Adam St Gang * Sir Bruce Liddington Sir Bruce is the former Schools Commissioner for England, and is the Director General of EACT – an education foundation opening Academies across England. He is former head of Northampton School for Boys, whose performance he transformed, and held several posts in the Academies Directorate. * Theodore Agnew Theodore is Deputy Chairman of Jubilee Managing Agency. He is also Chairman of the Norfolk Community Foundation, and a trustee of Policy Exchange. Family publishes Whitaker's Almanac, buried under Cleopatra's Needle, between Shell-Mex and Adelphi House. (Agnew family details here: http://www.911forum. org.uk/board/viewtop ic.php?t=19345) * Barbara Harrison Barbara is the former chief executive of the Girls’ Day School Trust, one of the largest and most successful providers of independent education in the UK. She established the first independent sector Academy (The Belvedere) in Liverpool, closely followed by Birkenhead High. * Professor Julian Le Grand Professor Le Grand is Richard Titmuss Professor of Social Policy at the London School of Economics. He was one of Tony Blair’s key advisers and has written books on the use of market systems in public services – including education. London School of Economics founded at Adelphi, John Adam St Gang. * Baroness Sally Morgan Sally is an adviser to Ark Academies. She is a former Director of Government Relations at 10 Downing Street and senior adviser to Tony Blair. Originally a secondary school teacher Sally has a BA (Hons) in Geography from Durham University, PGCE from London University and MA in Comparative Education from the Institute of Education. ARK at 15 Adam st, John Adam St Gang. Morgan's husband John Lyon has been with Liberty (more on Liberty below). * Rev Tim Hastie-Smith Tim was head of Dean Close in Cheltenham for ten years, and is a former chair of the Headmasters’ and Headmistresses’ Conference. He has been a school governor for a wide range of schools, and currently runs Perrett Laver’s practice within schools and colleges. * Heath Monk Heath is Chief Executive of Future Leaders which develops the next generation of leaders for challenging schools. He is the former Deputy Schools Commissioner. He also spent six years as a secondary teacher of English and Drama, having read English Literature at Queen’s College, Oxford. Future Leaders located at 15 Adam St, London and funded by ARK, so hence of the John Adam St Gang * Geoffrey Davies Geoffrey is a former partner for Lewis Silkin, where he acts as a consultant. He has helped to establish around 60 Academies, working with many of the major sponsors. He is on the board of ULT – a multi-Academy sponsor. Geoffrey Davies Solicitors are located at 21 Buckingham Street, which runs off John Adam St, parallel to Adam St. Curiously, this firm has the same phone number as Lewis Silken, located at Windsor House, 50 Victoria St, London. Lewis Silken write the academy funding agreements, and are associated with Liberty, which links to the PIE, Paedophile Information Exchange. (article here: http://www.telegraph .co.uk/news/newstopi cs/politics/labour/4 949555/Har riet-Harman-under-at tack-over-bid-to-wat er-down-child-pornog raphy-law. html) * James Merriman James is CEO of the New York City Charter School Center, which serves as a resource and facilitator for new charter schools. He is the former director of the Charter Schools Institute of the State University of New York (SUNY), one of America’s largest authorisers of charter schools. * Ian Cleland Ian is the Chief Executive of the Ormiston Academies Trust, a multi-Academy sponsor. He has been a Visiting Professor at Wolverhampton University. He has extensive experience of education consultancy at a senior level with KPMG, DCSF and Local Authorities and is a former head. * Paul Marshall Paul Marshall is the co-founder and Chairman of Marshall Wace LLP. He is also a co-founder and trustee of ARK – a multi academy sponsor – and of the charity Every Child a Chance. He is chair of the Management Committee of the liberal think tank CentreForum. ARK at 15 Adam St,[/p][/quote]I am with you on this & the way our society is going & who is behind it .. could do with contacting you if poss ? As for the school ... it`s all going to end in tears & segregation is order of the day[/p][/quote]We already have segregation! Blackburn with Darwen's primary schools are amongst the worst performing in the North West. Nothing less than a step change is required. sallythomson
  • Score: 0

5:53pm Sun 8 Apr 12

sallythomson says...

living the end times in BB1 wrote:
Q:How does a Muslim bloke get his misses pregnant..?
Why so much hatred?
[quote][p][bold]living the end times in BB1[/bold] wrote: Q:How does a Muslim bloke get his misses pregnant..?[/p][/quote]Why so much hatred? sallythomson
  • Score: 0

7:01pm Sun 8 Apr 12

Icestreng38 says...

bmurtaja wrote:
This is excellent news for Blackburn. The whole idea of the Free Schools policy is to enable excellent educational providers like Tauheedul to establish schools in places like Blackburn where councillors like Maureen Bateson have failed the local people. You just have to see the state of some of the primary school such as St Stephens and St Silas and the Ofsted inspections and the results speak for themselves.

So I hope Tauheedul establish more schools in Blackburn and just as the council was forced to give Blakewater College to Tauheedul, I hope Tauheedul takes more responsibility for schools in Blackburn as the council has failed, and failed for too long.

Well done Tauheedul and I am confident your application will be approved by the Department for Education.
The very fact that this school is labelled Muslim immediately identifies it as an exclusive establishment. We already have more than enough faith schools. All our children ought to be able to go through their school life without being influenced one way or another by any religion. The decision about which faith is right for a person can only be made when that person is an adult and has gathered enough experience to make an informed choice. All schools should be secular but should teach about all faiths and religions. The sooner the government prevents all religious organisations from running our schools the better.
[quote][p][bold]bmurtaja[/bold] wrote: This is excellent news for Blackburn. The whole idea of the Free Schools policy is to enable excellent educational providers like Tauheedul to establish schools in places like Blackburn where councillors like Maureen Bateson have failed the local people. You just have to see the state of some of the primary school such as St Stephens and St Silas and the Ofsted inspections and the results speak for themselves. So I hope Tauheedul establish more schools in Blackburn and just as the council was forced to give Blakewater College to Tauheedul, I hope Tauheedul takes more responsibility for schools in Blackburn as the council has failed, and failed for too long. Well done Tauheedul and I am confident your application will be approved by the Department for Education.[/p][/quote]The very fact that this school is labelled Muslim immediately identifies it as an exclusive establishment. We already have more than enough faith schools. All our children ought to be able to go through their school life without being influenced one way or another by any religion. The decision about which faith is right for a person can only be made when that person is an adult and has gathered enough experience to make an informed choice. All schools should be secular but should teach about all faiths and religions. The sooner the government prevents all religious organisations from running our schools the better. Icestreng38
  • Score: 0

7:31pm Sun 8 Apr 12

bigjohn998 says...

One question; and this is a belweather for the attitude of the schools management to education and Islam. In science will they teach evolution, or bat crap crazy creationism based on fairy stories from the koran?
One question; and this is a belweather for the attitude of the schools management to education and Islam. In science will they teach evolution, or bat crap crazy creationism based on fairy stories from the koran? bigjohn998
  • Score: 0

7:35pm Sun 8 Apr 12

bigjohn998 says...

One question; and this is a belweather for the attitude of the schools management to education and Islam. In science will they teach evolution, or bat crap crazy creationism based on fairy stories from the koran?
One question; and this is a belweather for the attitude of the schools management to education and Islam. In science will they teach evolution, or bat crap crazy creationism based on fairy stories from the koran? bigjohn998
  • Score: 0

8:43pm Sun 8 Apr 12

sallythomson says...

bigjohn998 wrote:
One question; and this is a belweather for the attitude of the schools management to education and Islam. In science will they teach evolution, or bat crap crazy creationism based on fairy stories from the koran?
All free schools and academies are required to teach evolution. This is agreed as part of the funding agreement.
[quote][p][bold]bigjohn998[/bold] wrote: One question; and this is a belweather for the attitude of the schools management to education and Islam. In science will they teach evolution, or bat crap crazy creationism based on fairy stories from the koran?[/p][/quote]All free schools and academies are required to teach evolution. This is agreed as part of the funding agreement. sallythomson
  • Score: 0

8:46pm Sun 8 Apr 12

sallythomson says...

Icestreng38 wrote:
bmurtaja wrote: This is excellent news for Blackburn. The whole idea of the Free Schools policy is to enable excellent educational providers like Tauheedul to establish schools in places like Blackburn where councillors like Maureen Bateson have failed the local people. You just have to see the state of some of the primary school such as St Stephens and St Silas and the Ofsted inspections and the results speak for themselves. So I hope Tauheedul establish more schools in Blackburn and just as the council was forced to give Blakewater College to Tauheedul, I hope Tauheedul takes more responsibility for schools in Blackburn as the council has failed, and failed for too long. Well done Tauheedul and I am confident your application will be approved by the Department for Education.
The very fact that this school is labelled Muslim immediately identifies it as an exclusive establishment. We already have more than enough faith schools. All our children ought to be able to go through their school life without being influenced one way or another by any religion. The decision about which faith is right for a person can only be made when that person is an adult and has gathered enough experience to make an informed choice. All schools should be secular but should teach about all faiths and religions. The sooner the government prevents all religious organisations from running our schools the better.
Yes, but look at Blackburn. The best schools are faith schools. In fact the majority of primary schools are faith schools.
[quote][p][bold]Icestreng38[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]bmurtaja[/bold] wrote: This is excellent news for Blackburn. The whole idea of the Free Schools policy is to enable excellent educational providers like Tauheedul to establish schools in places like Blackburn where councillors like Maureen Bateson have failed the local people. You just have to see the state of some of the primary school such as St Stephens and St Silas and the Ofsted inspections and the results speak for themselves. So I hope Tauheedul establish more schools in Blackburn and just as the council was forced to give Blakewater College to Tauheedul, I hope Tauheedul takes more responsibility for schools in Blackburn as the council has failed, and failed for too long. Well done Tauheedul and I am confident your application will be approved by the Department for Education.[/p][/quote]The very fact that this school is labelled Muslim immediately identifies it as an exclusive establishment. We already have more than enough faith schools. All our children ought to be able to go through their school life without being influenced one way or another by any religion. The decision about which faith is right for a person can only be made when that person is an adult and has gathered enough experience to make an informed choice. All schools should be secular but should teach about all faiths and religions. The sooner the government prevents all religious organisations from running our schools the better.[/p][/quote]Yes, but look at Blackburn. The best schools are faith schools. In fact the majority of primary schools are faith schools. sallythomson
  • Score: 0

8:48pm Sun 8 Apr 12

StephenDes says...

A few points here;

1] Free schools, along with all other schools, will teach evolution rather than creationism in Science lessons. The law is clear about this.
2] Exclusivity; 50% of the places in the new primary school will be open to non-Muslims. That's pretty reasonable when compared to some other schools. One might actually see it as an invitation to other families to attend.
3] Segregation; I think it's hard to force people to live together, and it's natural for people of similar backgrounds and beliefs to want to live as a community. There are of course potential problems with this. People not understanding or respecting each other, and being mistrustful of each other's motives is a real worry not just for Blackburn, but the whole country. Schools can play a major role in encouraging respect and tolerance, but in the main we learn respect from our parents. I believe that integration is everybody's responsibility, not just schools'. Employers, councils, religious groups, government, youth groups and voluntary organisations all have a part to play. Let us remember for a moment some of the dreadful incidents to occur recently in the world of football; were either religion or schools responsible for these? Let us also remember the experience of the first immigrants to this country; the man or woman who placed the 'No Dogs, No Blacks, No Irish' in their boarding house window has a lot to answer for. The original triggers for segregation were racism and prejudice.
4] Finally, on the subject of education, some ethnic groups containing significant numbers of Muslims used to be at the bottom of the league tables. Some people in Blackburn have decided to do something about it, and so far so good. I want to live in a country where effort, initiative, and sheer hard are rewarded, rather than blaming everybody else for one's misfortune. I do not have to share some-one's faith to share their dream of better education and better life chances for young people. I wish them, and all people of good intentions well this Easter
A few points here; 1] Free schools, along with all other schools, will teach evolution rather than creationism in Science lessons. The law is clear about this. 2] Exclusivity; 50% of the places in the new primary school will be open to non-Muslims. That's pretty reasonable when compared to some other schools. One might actually see it as an invitation to other families to attend. 3] Segregation; I think it's hard to force people to live together, and it's natural for people of similar backgrounds and beliefs to want to live as a community. There are of course potential problems with this. People not understanding or respecting each other, and being mistrustful of each other's motives is a real worry not just for Blackburn, but the whole country. Schools can play a major role in encouraging respect and tolerance, but in the main we learn respect from our parents. I believe that integration is everybody's responsibility, not just schools'. Employers, councils, religious groups, government, youth groups and voluntary organisations all have a part to play. Let us remember for a moment some of the dreadful incidents to occur recently in the world of football; were either religion or schools responsible for these? Let us also remember the experience of the first immigrants to this country; the man or woman who placed the 'No Dogs, No Blacks, No Irish' in their boarding house window has a lot to answer for. The original triggers for segregation were racism and prejudice. 4] Finally, on the subject of education, some ethnic groups containing significant numbers of Muslims used to be at the bottom of the league tables. Some people in Blackburn have decided to do something about it, and so far so good. I want to live in a country where effort, initiative, and sheer hard are rewarded, rather than blaming everybody else for one's misfortune. I do not have to share some-one's faith to share their dream of better education and better life chances for young people. I wish them, and all people of good intentions well this Easter StephenDes
  • Score: 0

10:56pm Sun 8 Apr 12

Icestreng38 says...

sallythomson wrote:
Icestreng38 wrote:
bmurtaja wrote: This is excellent news for Blackburn. The whole idea of the Free Schools policy is to enable excellent educational providers like Tauheedul to establish schools in places like Blackburn where councillors like Maureen Bateson have failed the local people. You just have to see the state of some of the primary school such as St Stephens and St Silas and the Ofsted inspections and the results speak for themselves. So I hope Tauheedul establish more schools in Blackburn and just as the council was forced to give Blakewater College to Tauheedul, I hope Tauheedul takes more responsibility for schools in Blackburn as the council has failed, and failed for too long. Well done Tauheedul and I am confident your application will be approved by the Department for Education.
The very fact that this school is labelled Muslim immediately identifies it as an exclusive establishment. We already have more than enough faith schools. All our children ought to be able to go through their school life without being influenced one way or another by any religion. The decision about which faith is right for a person can only be made when that person is an adult and has gathered enough experience to make an informed choice. All schools should be secular but should teach about all faiths and religions. The sooner the government prevents all religious organisations from running our schools the better.
Yes, but look at Blackburn. The best schools are faith schools. In fact the majority of primary schools are faith schools.
I'm not sure what your point is. Either we give children an unbiased education or not. I suspect the vast majority of schools have affiliation with one faith or another. Inevitably some of these schools will have good teachers, good head teachers and consequently good results. That doesn't mean the situation is acceptable. Children are very impressional and are inclined to believe everything they are told, particularly at school. Religion is such an emotive subject and everybody should be given the opportunity to make their own mind up once they are mature enough and experienced enough to decide. This is impossible if they are immersed in one religion from a very young age.
[quote][p][bold]sallythomson[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Icestreng38[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]bmurtaja[/bold] wrote: This is excellent news for Blackburn. The whole idea of the Free Schools policy is to enable excellent educational providers like Tauheedul to establish schools in places like Blackburn where councillors like Maureen Bateson have failed the local people. You just have to see the state of some of the primary school such as St Stephens and St Silas and the Ofsted inspections and the results speak for themselves. So I hope Tauheedul establish more schools in Blackburn and just as the council was forced to give Blakewater College to Tauheedul, I hope Tauheedul takes more responsibility for schools in Blackburn as the council has failed, and failed for too long. Well done Tauheedul and I am confident your application will be approved by the Department for Education.[/p][/quote]The very fact that this school is labelled Muslim immediately identifies it as an exclusive establishment. We already have more than enough faith schools. All our children ought to be able to go through their school life without being influenced one way or another by any religion. The decision about which faith is right for a person can only be made when that person is an adult and has gathered enough experience to make an informed choice. All schools should be secular but should teach about all faiths and religions. The sooner the government prevents all religious organisations from running our schools the better.[/p][/quote]Yes, but look at Blackburn. The best schools are faith schools. In fact the majority of primary schools are faith schools.[/p][/quote]I'm not sure what your point is. Either we give children an unbiased education or not. I suspect the vast majority of schools have affiliation with one faith or another. Inevitably some of these schools will have good teachers, good head teachers and consequently good results. That doesn't mean the situation is acceptable. Children are very impressional and are inclined to believe everything they are told, particularly at school. Religion is such an emotive subject and everybody should be given the opportunity to make their own mind up once they are mature enough and experienced enough to decide. This is impossible if they are immersed in one religion from a very young age. Icestreng38
  • Score: 0

11:44pm Sun 8 Apr 12

Stanley fan says...

You missed the point -in order to make an informed choice they need to be educated. Tauheedul is providing outstanding education -sadly not many others are. Large numbers of our children are leaving school with little to show for it. That's why Muslim parents have been demanding primary school that will provide the same high quality education they have come to expect from Tauheedul secondary school.
We need more schools like Tauheedul -let's hope they get the go ahead for the primary school and can provide an excellent primary schools - that'll give mediocre primar schools something to think about.
You missed the point -in order to make an informed choice they need to be educated. Tauheedul is providing outstanding education -sadly not many others are. Large numbers of our children are leaving school with little to show for it. That's why Muslim parents have been demanding primary school that will provide the same high quality education they have come to expect from Tauheedul secondary school. We need more schools like Tauheedul -let's hope they get the go ahead for the primary school and can provide an excellent primary schools - that'll give mediocre primar schools something to think about. Stanley fan
  • Score: 0

12:49am Mon 9 Apr 12

abztheman says...

bigjohn998 wrote:
One question; and this is a belweather for the attitude of the schools management to education and Islam. In science will they teach evolution, or bat crap crazy creationism based on fairy stories from the koran?
I actually consider this the first time I have been impressed with the interaction taking place on the LET comments section.
Good communication. Even if all sides do not agree shows at least all hope is not lost for greater social harmony within our seriously deprived and sorry to say scr3w3d up town!
[quote][p][bold]bigjohn998[/bold] wrote: One question; and this is a belweather for the attitude of the schools management to education and Islam. In science will they teach evolution, or bat crap crazy creationism based on fairy stories from the koran?[/p][/quote]I actually consider this the first time I have been impressed with the interaction taking place on the LET comments section. Good communication. Even if all sides do not agree shows at least all hope is not lost for greater social harmony within our seriously deprived and sorry to say scr3w3d up town! abztheman
  • Score: 0

4:26am Mon 9 Apr 12

coxy78 says...

WOW WHAT A SURPRISE!!!!!INNNITT
T
WOW WHAT A SURPRISE!!!!!INNNITT T coxy78
  • Score: 0

8:42am Mon 9 Apr 12

living the end times in BB1 says...

The problem, as I see it, is that access to the public spheres, specifically the commercial sphere, often depends on being comfortable with the norms of white society. If a significant number of muslim children aren't comfortable with them, it isn't by choice: It's because they were isolated from those norms. It's one thing for members of the muslim elite upper middle class to choose to retire to predominantly muslim neighborhoods after a lucrative day's work in white British society. It's quite another for people to be unable to enter that commercial sphere because they spent their formative years in a community that didn't, or couldn't, prepare them for it.
The problem, as I see it, is that access to the public spheres, specifically the commercial sphere, often depends on being comfortable with the norms of white society. If a significant number of muslim children aren't comfortable with them, it isn't by choice: It's because they were isolated from those norms. It's one thing for members of the muslim elite upper middle class to choose to retire to predominantly muslim neighborhoods after a lucrative day's work in white British society. It's quite another for people to be unable to enter that commercial sphere because they spent their formative years in a community that didn't, or couldn't, prepare them for it. living the end times in BB1
  • Score: 0

9:21am Mon 9 Apr 12

StephenDes says...

The greatest barriers to being able to being effective in the commercial sphere - according to business leaders - are the lack of such things as literacy, numeracy, creativity, the capacity to take risk, etc... Good schools can make an impact in many of those areas, but not all of them. Their primary function is to make young people as literate and numerate as possible, confident, articulate, polite and respectful. After that, it's up to them.
I have no problem whatsoever with the 'muslim elite' living in certain neighborhoods, if that is indeed the case. It's up to them where they choose to live. There are far too many young people from all social backgrounds who render themselves unemployable by lacking the essential skills, plus the necessary spark that employers look for.

I don't see what you're getting at by the phrase 'the norms of white society'. I also have a substantially different experience of Muslims being able to function with non-Muslim colleagues. 'White society' is a vast canvas here in the UK, some of which I am personally, as a white man, comfortable with, other aspects not. There are also, lest we fall into the 'us and them' trap that some posters here would seem to embrace, a huge overlap in values that mean can easily function together, whilst accepting certain differences. I think I have virtually nothing in common, for example, with the great majority of the bankers in the City, nearly all of whom appear to be white. I once found myself in a pub with them in London, and found them objectionable in the extreme. I have also come to seriously resent our town centres being ruined by the modern 'binge-drinking' phenomenon, with people swearing, fighting and urinating publicly. I may also add that being on a train with football supporters is not an experience I wish to repeat. If that's white culture, you can keep it. But we don't all have to think alike or behave alike, so I'm just going to have to live with it.
The Muslims I know and work with all seem to respect family life, place great emphasis on education, and their houses are spotless. I do not however share their faith, but we just agree to differ. I have friends who are Catholic, and I don't share their faith either. White British people are not a homogenous group if identikit individuals, and neither are Muslims. A genuine respect for different beliefs and lifestyles is all that is needed here; is that really too much to ask?
The greatest barriers to being able to being effective in the commercial sphere - according to business leaders - are the lack of such things as literacy, numeracy, creativity, the capacity to take risk, etc... Good schools can make an impact in many of those areas, but not all of them. Their primary function is to make young people as literate and numerate as possible, confident, articulate, polite and respectful. After that, it's up to them. I have no problem whatsoever with the 'muslim elite' living in certain neighborhoods, if that is indeed the case. It's up to them where they choose to live. There are far too many young people from all social backgrounds who render themselves unemployable by lacking the essential skills, plus the necessary spark that employers [rightly] look for. I don't see what you're getting at by the phrase 'the norms of white society'. I also have a substantially different experience of Muslims being able to function with non-Muslim colleagues. 'White society' is a vast canvas here in the UK, some of which I am personally, as a white man, comfortable with, other aspects not. There are also, lest we fall into the 'us and them' trap that some posters here would seem to embrace, a huge overlap in values that mean can easily function together, whilst accepting certain differences. I think I have virtually nothing in common, for example, with the great majority of the bankers in the City, nearly all of whom appear to be white. I once found myself in a pub with them in London, and found them objectionable in the extreme. I have also come to seriously resent our town centres being ruined by the modern 'binge-drinking' phenomenon, with people swearing, fighting and urinating publicly. I may also add that being on a train with football supporters is not an experience I wish to repeat. If that's white culture, you can keep it. But we don't all have to think alike or behave alike, so I'm just going to have to live with it. The Muslims I know and work with all seem to respect family life, place great emphasis on education, and their houses are spotless. I do not however share their faith, but we just agree to differ. I have friends who are Catholic, and I don't share their faith either. White British people are not a homogenous group if identikit individuals, and neither are Muslims. A genuine respect for different beliefs and lifestyles is all that is needed here; is that really too much to ask? StephenDes
  • Score: 0

10:13am Mon 9 Apr 12

jack daniels says...

Lifeinthemix wrote:
Jack “You can only be jealous of someone who has something you think you ought to have yourself.” ― Margaret Atwood, The Handmaid's Tale

and of course the handmaids tale is all about being a happy slave, as such is a serious piece of programming.

you are what you absorb
I have a good education and my son got 7 a-c gcse's going to a main stream school with normal class sizes and no volunteers in the room. Nothing to be jealous for, especially where it comes to an education based on another countries idealogy. You know the concerns in Europe and the USA about Saudi and Qatari influence in high Muslim areas and how their strict beliefs are being promoted.
[quote][p][bold]Lifeinthemix[/bold] wrote: Jack “You can only be jealous of someone who has something you think you ought to have yourself.” ― Margaret Atwood, The Handmaid's Tale and of course the handmaids tale is all about being a happy slave, as such is a serious piece of programming. you are what you absorb[/p][/quote]I have a good education and my son got 7 a-c gcse's going to a main stream school with normal class sizes and no volunteers in the room. Nothing to be jealous for, especially where it comes to an education based on another countries idealogy. You know the concerns in Europe and the USA about Saudi and Qatari influence in high Muslim areas and how their strict beliefs are being promoted. jack daniels
  • Score: 0

11:39am Mon 9 Apr 12

sallythomson says...

StephenDes wrote:
The greatest barriers to being able to being effective in the commercial sphere - according to business leaders - are the lack of such things as literacy, numeracy, creativity, the capacity to take risk, etc... Good schools can make an impact in many of those areas, but not all of them. Their primary function is to make young people as literate and numerate as possible, confident, articulate, polite and respectful. After that, it's up to them. I have no problem whatsoever with the 'muslim elite' living in certain neighborhoods, if that is indeed the case. It's up to them where they choose to live. There are far too many young people from all social backgrounds who render themselves unemployable by lacking the essential skills, plus the necessary spark that employers look for. I don't see what you're getting at by the phrase 'the norms of white society'. I also have a substantially different experience of Muslims being able to function with non-Muslim colleagues. 'White society' is a vast canvas here in the UK, some of which I am personally, as a white man, comfortable with, other aspects not. There are also, lest we fall into the 'us and them' trap that some posters here would seem to embrace, a huge overlap in values that mean can easily function together, whilst accepting certain differences. I think I have virtually nothing in common, for example, with the great majority of the bankers in the City, nearly all of whom appear to be white. I once found myself in a pub with them in London, and found them objectionable in the extreme. I have also come to seriously resent our town centres being ruined by the modern 'binge-drinking' phenomenon, with people swearing, fighting and urinating publicly. I may also add that being on a train with football supporters is not an experience I wish to repeat. If that's white culture, you can keep it. But we don't all have to think alike or behave alike, so I'm just going to have to live with it. The Muslims I know and work with all seem to respect family life, place great emphasis on education, and their houses are spotless. I do not however share their faith, but we just agree to differ. I have friends who are Catholic, and I don't share their faith either. White British people are not a homogenous group if identikit individuals, and neither are Muslims. A genuine respect for different beliefs and lifestyles is all that is needed here; is that really too much to ask?
Excellent points. If this school will help to raise standards in our town then I am all for it.
[quote][p][bold]StephenDes[/bold] wrote: The greatest barriers to being able to being effective in the commercial sphere - according to business leaders - are the lack of such things as literacy, numeracy, creativity, the capacity to take risk, etc... Good schools can make an impact in many of those areas, but not all of them. Their primary function is to make young people as literate and numerate as possible, confident, articulate, polite and respectful. After that, it's up to them. I have no problem whatsoever with the 'muslim elite' living in certain neighborhoods, if that is indeed the case. It's up to them where they choose to live. There are far too many young people from all social backgrounds who render themselves unemployable by lacking the essential skills, plus the necessary spark that employers [rightly] look for. I don't see what you're getting at by the phrase 'the norms of white society'. I also have a substantially different experience of Muslims being able to function with non-Muslim colleagues. 'White society' is a vast canvas here in the UK, some of which I am personally, as a white man, comfortable with, other aspects not. There are also, lest we fall into the 'us and them' trap that some posters here would seem to embrace, a huge overlap in values that mean can easily function together, whilst accepting certain differences. I think I have virtually nothing in common, for example, with the great majority of the bankers in the City, nearly all of whom appear to be white. I once found myself in a pub with them in London, and found them objectionable in the extreme. I have also come to seriously resent our town centres being ruined by the modern 'binge-drinking' phenomenon, with people swearing, fighting and urinating publicly. I may also add that being on a train with football supporters is not an experience I wish to repeat. If that's white culture, you can keep it. But we don't all have to think alike or behave alike, so I'm just going to have to live with it. The Muslims I know and work with all seem to respect family life, place great emphasis on education, and their houses are spotless. I do not however share their faith, but we just agree to differ. I have friends who are Catholic, and I don't share their faith either. White British people are not a homogenous group if identikit individuals, and neither are Muslims. A genuine respect for different beliefs and lifestyles is all that is needed here; is that really too much to ask?[/p][/quote]Excellent points. If this school will help to raise standards in our town then I am all for it. sallythomson
  • Score: 0

12:32pm Mon 9 Apr 12

StephenDes says...

Jack - If you think that the simple repetition of certain lies will ensure that, over time, people will start to believe them, you are mistaken. You allege, not for the first time I believe, that there is some form of Qatari and Saudi influence at Tauheedul. This is an absurd, crazy allegation. My online research has revealed that Qatar made a contribution to the construction of the Tauheedul mosque. That is not the school. David Frost, the well-known journalist and interviewer, works for Al-Jazeera, which is based in Qatar; is he now to be viewed with suspicion? The primary school, as with the other schools connected to Tauheedul, will be obliged to follow the national curriculum, and will sit the same public exams that your son successfully sat some time ago. There is no way that the school will be providing an education... 'based upon another country's ideology'. Schools in Britain are very transparent organisations in terms of what is taught, and the financial scrutiny is also strict, rightly so. You can keep throwing this mud around Jack, but I'm afraid it just won't stick.
Jack - If you think that the simple repetition of certain lies will ensure that, over time, people will start to believe them, you are mistaken. You allege, not for the first time I believe, that there is some form of Qatari and Saudi influence at Tauheedul. This is an absurd, crazy allegation. My online research has revealed that Qatar made a contribution to the construction of the Tauheedul mosque. That is not the school. David Frost, the well-known journalist and interviewer, works for Al-Jazeera, which is based in Qatar; is he now to be viewed with suspicion? The primary school, as with the other schools connected to Tauheedul, will be obliged to follow the national curriculum, and will sit the same public exams that your son successfully sat some time ago. There is no way that the school will be providing an education... 'based upon another country's ideology'. Schools in Britain are very transparent organisations in terms of what is taught, and the financial scrutiny is also strict, rightly so. You can keep throwing this mud around Jack, but I'm afraid it just won't stick. StephenDes
  • Score: 0

1:30pm Mon 9 Apr 12

sallythomson says...

StephenDes wrote:
Jack - If you think that the simple repetition of certain lies will ensure that, over time, people will start to believe them, you are mistaken. You allege, not for the first time I believe, that there is some form of Qatari and Saudi influence at Tauheedul. This is an absurd, crazy allegation. My online research has revealed that Qatar made a contribution to the construction of the Tauheedul mosque. That is not the school. David Frost, the well-known journalist and interviewer, works for Al-Jazeera, which is based in Qatar; is he now to be viewed with suspicion? The primary school, as with the other schools connected to Tauheedul, will be obliged to follow the national curriculum, and will sit the same public exams that your son successfully sat some time ago. There is no way that the school will be providing an education... 'based upon another country's ideology'. Schools in Britain are very transparent organisations in terms of what is taught, and the financial scrutiny is also strict, rightly so. You can keep throwing this mud around Jack, but I'm afraid it just won't stick.
You are correct. All free schools and academies are required to produce detailed curriculum plans as part of the approval process. We have to accept that these guys are good at running schools. We need them to work closely with the Local Authority to support all children in our town.
[quote][p][bold]StephenDes[/bold] wrote: Jack - If you think that the simple repetition of certain lies will ensure that, over time, people will start to believe them, you are mistaken. You allege, not for the first time I believe, that there is some form of Qatari and Saudi influence at Tauheedul. This is an absurd, crazy allegation. My online research has revealed that Qatar made a contribution to the construction of the Tauheedul mosque. That is not the school. David Frost, the well-known journalist and interviewer, works for Al-Jazeera, which is based in Qatar; is he now to be viewed with suspicion? The primary school, as with the other schools connected to Tauheedul, will be obliged to follow the national curriculum, and will sit the same public exams that your son successfully sat some time ago. There is no way that the school will be providing an education... 'based upon another country's ideology'. Schools in Britain are very transparent organisations in terms of what is taught, and the financial scrutiny is also strict, rightly so. You can keep throwing this mud around Jack, but I'm afraid it just won't stick.[/p][/quote]You are correct. All free schools and academies are required to produce detailed curriculum plans as part of the approval process. We have to accept that these guys are good at running schools. We need them to work closely with the Local Authority to support all children in our town. sallythomson
  • Score: 0

2:13pm Mon 9 Apr 12

Lifeinthemix says...

StephenDes wrote:
Jack - If you think that the simple repetition of certain lies will ensure that, over time, people will start to believe them, you are mistaken. You allege, not for the first time I believe, that there is some form of Qatari and Saudi influence at Tauheedul. This is an absurd, crazy allegation. My online research has revealed that Qatar made a contribution to the construction of the Tauheedul mosque. That is not the school. David Frost, the well-known journalist and interviewer, works for Al-Jazeera, which is based in Qatar; is he now to be viewed with suspicion? The primary school, as with the other schools connected to Tauheedul, will be obliged to follow the national curriculum, and will sit the same public exams that your son successfully sat some time ago. There is no way that the school will be providing an education... 'based upon another country's ideology'. Schools in Britain are very transparent organisations in terms of what is taught, and the financial scrutiny is also strict, rightly so. You can keep throwing this mud around Jack, but I'm afraid it just won't stick.
you are sooo wrong stevy boy so so wrong. transparency is a term not understood by todays teachers

http://youtu.be/Eh_O
Z1x3nsE

i have FOI'd myself to death with the schools particulary Peel park in Accrington, they lie and are then backed by LCC, the police, the firegirls and ICO, so if you are of the mind all is well in the schools, you are those most decieved by the schools and state.
[quote][p][bold]StephenDes[/bold] wrote: Jack - If you think that the simple repetition of certain lies will ensure that, over time, people will start to believe them, you are mistaken. You allege, not for the first time I believe, that there is some form of Qatari and Saudi influence at Tauheedul. This is an absurd, crazy allegation. My online research has revealed that Qatar made a contribution to the construction of the Tauheedul mosque. That is not the school. David Frost, the well-known journalist and interviewer, works for Al-Jazeera, which is based in Qatar; is he now to be viewed with suspicion? The primary school, as with the other schools connected to Tauheedul, will be obliged to follow the national curriculum, and will sit the same public exams that your son successfully sat some time ago. There is no way that the school will be providing an education... 'based upon another country's ideology'. Schools in Britain are very transparent organisations in terms of what is taught, and the financial scrutiny is also strict, rightly so. You can keep throwing this mud around Jack, but I'm afraid it just won't stick.[/p][/quote]you are sooo wrong stevy boy so so wrong. transparency is a term not understood by todays teachers http://youtu.be/Eh_O Z1x3nsE i have FOI'd myself to death with the schools particulary Peel park in Accrington, they lie and are then backed by LCC, the police, the firegirls and ICO, so if you are of the mind all is well in the schools, you are those most decieved by the schools and state. Lifeinthemix
  • Score: 0

3:19pm Mon 9 Apr 12

sallythomson says...

Lifeinthemix wrote:
StephenDes wrote: Jack - If you think that the simple repetition of certain lies will ensure that, over time, people will start to believe them, you are mistaken. You allege, not for the first time I believe, that there is some form of Qatari and Saudi influence at Tauheedul. This is an absurd, crazy allegation. My online research has revealed that Qatar made a contribution to the construction of the Tauheedul mosque. That is not the school. David Frost, the well-known journalist and interviewer, works for Al-Jazeera, which is based in Qatar; is he now to be viewed with suspicion? The primary school, as with the other schools connected to Tauheedul, will be obliged to follow the national curriculum, and will sit the same public exams that your son successfully sat some time ago. There is no way that the school will be providing an education... 'based upon another country's ideology'. Schools in Britain are very transparent organisations in terms of what is taught, and the financial scrutiny is also strict, rightly so. You can keep throwing this mud around Jack, but I'm afraid it just won't stick.
you are sooo wrong stevy boy so so wrong. transparency is a term not understood by todays teachers http://youtu.be/Eh_O Z1x3nsE i have FOI'd myself to death with the schools particulary Peel park in Accrington, they lie and are then backed by LCC, the police, the firegirls and ICO, so if you are of the mind all is well in the schools, you are those most decieved by the schools and state.
You are correct. We need to sort out the mess in our schools. Our children deserve better. We can not depend on Maureen Bateson.
[quote][p][bold]Lifeinthemix[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]StephenDes[/bold] wrote: Jack - If you think that the simple repetition of certain lies will ensure that, over time, people will start to believe them, you are mistaken. You allege, not for the first time I believe, that there is some form of Qatari and Saudi influence at Tauheedul. This is an absurd, crazy allegation. My online research has revealed that Qatar made a contribution to the construction of the Tauheedul mosque. That is not the school. David Frost, the well-known journalist and interviewer, works for Al-Jazeera, which is based in Qatar; is he now to be viewed with suspicion? The primary school, as with the other schools connected to Tauheedul, will be obliged to follow the national curriculum, and will sit the same public exams that your son successfully sat some time ago. There is no way that the school will be providing an education... 'based upon another country's ideology'. Schools in Britain are very transparent organisations in terms of what is taught, and the financial scrutiny is also strict, rightly so. You can keep throwing this mud around Jack, but I'm afraid it just won't stick.[/p][/quote]you are sooo wrong stevy boy so so wrong. transparency is a term not understood by todays teachers http://youtu.be/Eh_O Z1x3nsE i have FOI'd myself to death with the schools particulary Peel park in Accrington, they lie and are then backed by LCC, the police, the firegirls and ICO, so if you are of the mind all is well in the schools, you are those most decieved by the schools and state.[/p][/quote]You are correct. We need to sort out the mess in our schools. Our children deserve better. We can not depend on Maureen Bateson. sallythomson
  • Score: 0

3:42pm Mon 9 Apr 12

jack daniels says...

sallythomson wrote:
Lifeinthemix wrote:
StephenDes wrote: Jack - If you think that the simple repetition of certain lies will ensure that, over time, people will start to believe them, you are mistaken. You allege, not for the first time I believe, that there is some form of Qatari and Saudi influence at Tauheedul. This is an absurd, crazy allegation. My online research has revealed that Qatar made a contribution to the construction of the Tauheedul mosque. That is not the school. David Frost, the well-known journalist and interviewer, works for Al-Jazeera, which is based in Qatar; is he now to be viewed with suspicion? The primary school, as with the other schools connected to Tauheedul, will be obliged to follow the national curriculum, and will sit the same public exams that your son successfully sat some time ago. There is no way that the school will be providing an education... 'based upon another country's ideology'. Schools in Britain are very transparent organisations in terms of what is taught, and the financial scrutiny is also strict, rightly so. You can keep throwing this mud around Jack, but I'm afraid it just won't stick.
you are sooo wrong stevy boy so so wrong. transparency is a term not understood by todays teachers http://youtu.be/Eh_O Z1x3nsE i have FOI'd myself to death with the schools particulary Peel park in Accrington, they lie and are then backed by LCC, the police, the firegirls and ICO, so if you are of the mind all is well in the schools, you are those most decieved by the schools and state.
You are correct. We need to sort out the mess in our schools. Our children deserve better. We can not depend on Maureen Bateson.
Or funding from foreign countries; not just here but throughout Europe and north America. Ste, the mosque run the school, based on the same religious teachings. These will be taught to 1000's of children in the west, being taught another way of living. Seriously, are they going to advertise this? Of course not, yet it is not I that isolates my children from other cultures.
[quote][p][bold]sallythomson[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Lifeinthemix[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]StephenDes[/bold] wrote: Jack - If you think that the simple repetition of certain lies will ensure that, over time, people will start to believe them, you are mistaken. You allege, not for the first time I believe, that there is some form of Qatari and Saudi influence at Tauheedul. This is an absurd, crazy allegation. My online research has revealed that Qatar made a contribution to the construction of the Tauheedul mosque. That is not the school. David Frost, the well-known journalist and interviewer, works for Al-Jazeera, which is based in Qatar; is he now to be viewed with suspicion? The primary school, as with the other schools connected to Tauheedul, will be obliged to follow the national curriculum, and will sit the same public exams that your son successfully sat some time ago. There is no way that the school will be providing an education... 'based upon another country's ideology'. Schools in Britain are very transparent organisations in terms of what is taught, and the financial scrutiny is also strict, rightly so. You can keep throwing this mud around Jack, but I'm afraid it just won't stick.[/p][/quote]you are sooo wrong stevy boy so so wrong. transparency is a term not understood by todays teachers http://youtu.be/Eh_O Z1x3nsE i have FOI'd myself to death with the schools particulary Peel park in Accrington, they lie and are then backed by LCC, the police, the firegirls and ICO, so if you are of the mind all is well in the schools, you are those most decieved by the schools and state.[/p][/quote]You are correct. We need to sort out the mess in our schools. Our children deserve better. We can not depend on Maureen Bateson.[/p][/quote]Or funding from foreign countries; not just here but throughout Europe and north America. Ste, the mosque run the school, based on the same religious teachings. These will be taught to 1000's of children in the west, being taught another way of living. Seriously, are they going to advertise this? Of course not, yet it is not I that isolates my children from other cultures. jack daniels
  • Score: 0

4:07pm Mon 9 Apr 12

sallythomson says...

jack daniels wrote:
sallythomson wrote:
Lifeinthemix wrote:
StephenDes wrote: Jack - If you think that the simple repetition of certain lies will ensure that, over time, people will start to believe them, you are mistaken. You allege, not for the first time I believe, that there is some form of Qatari and Saudi influence at Tauheedul. This is an absurd, crazy allegation. My online research has revealed that Qatar made a contribution to the construction of the Tauheedul mosque. That is not the school. David Frost, the well-known journalist and interviewer, works for Al-Jazeera, which is based in Qatar; is he now to be viewed with suspicion? The primary school, as with the other schools connected to Tauheedul, will be obliged to follow the national curriculum, and will sit the same public exams that your son successfully sat some time ago. There is no way that the school will be providing an education... 'based upon another country's ideology'. Schools in Britain are very transparent organisations in terms of what is taught, and the financial scrutiny is also strict, rightly so. You can keep throwing this mud around Jack, but I'm afraid it just won't stick.
you are sooo wrong stevy boy so so wrong. transparency is a term not understood by todays teachers http://youtu.be/Eh_O Z1x3nsE i have FOI'd myself to death with the schools particulary Peel park in Accrington, they lie and are then backed by LCC, the police, the firegirls and ICO, so if you are of the mind all is well in the schools, you are those most decieved by the schools and state.
You are correct. We need to sort out the mess in our schools. Our children deserve better. We can not depend on Maureen Bateson.
Or funding from foreign countries; not just here but throughout Europe and north America. Ste, the mosque run the school, based on the same religious teachings. These will be taught to 1000's of children in the west, being taught another way of living. Seriously, are they going to advertise this? Of course not, yet it is not I that isolates my children from other cultures.
So, the catholic church in Rome also funds cathloic schools in the UK?
[quote][p][bold]jack daniels[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]sallythomson[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Lifeinthemix[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]StephenDes[/bold] wrote: Jack - If you think that the simple repetition of certain lies will ensure that, over time, people will start to believe them, you are mistaken. You allege, not for the first time I believe, that there is some form of Qatari and Saudi influence at Tauheedul. This is an absurd, crazy allegation. My online research has revealed that Qatar made a contribution to the construction of the Tauheedul mosque. That is not the school. David Frost, the well-known journalist and interviewer, works for Al-Jazeera, which is based in Qatar; is he now to be viewed with suspicion? The primary school, as with the other schools connected to Tauheedul, will be obliged to follow the national curriculum, and will sit the same public exams that your son successfully sat some time ago. There is no way that the school will be providing an education... 'based upon another country's ideology'. Schools in Britain are very transparent organisations in terms of what is taught, and the financial scrutiny is also strict, rightly so. You can keep throwing this mud around Jack, but I'm afraid it just won't stick.[/p][/quote]you are sooo wrong stevy boy so so wrong. transparency is a term not understood by todays teachers http://youtu.be/Eh_O Z1x3nsE i have FOI'd myself to death with the schools particulary Peel park in Accrington, they lie and are then backed by LCC, the police, the firegirls and ICO, so if you are of the mind all is well in the schools, you are those most decieved by the schools and state.[/p][/quote]You are correct. We need to sort out the mess in our schools. Our children deserve better. We can not depend on Maureen Bateson.[/p][/quote]Or funding from foreign countries; not just here but throughout Europe and north America. Ste, the mosque run the school, based on the same religious teachings. These will be taught to 1000's of children in the west, being taught another way of living. Seriously, are they going to advertise this? Of course not, yet it is not I that isolates my children from other cultures.[/p][/quote]So, the catholic church in Rome also funds cathloic schools in the UK? sallythomson
  • Score: 0

4:08pm Mon 9 Apr 12

karolgadge says...

StephenDes makes some excellent points about the proposed Tauheedul 'free school'. I like his style.

However, I do not see why he has taken such a dislike to City of London bankers, a sample of whom he has come across in the pub. I've met some City of London bankers too - not in the pub - and do not share his disdain. The ones I met (working for Goldman Sachs) fulfilled all the criteria that he describes as essential in developing a worthwhile education system viz: numerate, literate, confident, polite, articulate and respectful.

I suspect that StephenDes is allowing his left-wing objections to what was once described as 'the unacceptable face of capitalism' over-ride his intellectually respectable support for the Tauheedul School.

The bigger issues lie not in Tauheedul itself, which has a perfect right to exist under current legislation, plan for its own future and attract pupils from all ethnic groups.

The critical questions lie in the educational ideology of David Cameron and Michael Gove. They are extreme radicals in this field, Tory in a totally new sense of the word who wish to dismantle an educational system that has taken more than a hundred years to construct.
For the local council who are expected to plan 'logistically' on a playing field where the goal posts are not only constantly moving, but are actually being demolished by the present government, I have a lot of sympathy.
StephenDes makes some excellent points about the proposed Tauheedul 'free school'. I like his style. However, I do not see why he has taken such a dislike to City of London bankers, a sample of whom he has come across in the pub. I've met some City of London bankers too - not in the pub - and do not share his disdain. The ones I met (working for Goldman Sachs) fulfilled all the criteria that he describes as essential in developing a worthwhile education system viz: numerate, literate, confident, polite, articulate and respectful. I suspect that StephenDes is allowing his left-wing objections to what was once described as 'the unacceptable face of capitalism' over-ride his intellectually respectable support for the Tauheedul School. The bigger issues lie not in Tauheedul itself, which has a perfect right to exist under current legislation, plan for its own future and attract pupils from all ethnic groups. The critical questions lie in the educational ideology of David Cameron and Michael Gove. They are extreme radicals in this field, Tory in a totally new sense of the word who wish to dismantle an educational system that has taken more than a hundred years to construct. For the local council who are expected to plan 'logistically' on a playing field where the goal posts are not only constantly moving, but are actually being demolished by the present government, I have a lot of sympathy. karolgadge
  • Score: 0

4:17pm Mon 9 Apr 12

Kingkhan1 says...

retired one wrote:
Integration or Segregation?
That is the question.
Unfortunately it is the wrong question.

Segregation is a fact of life. As one of the other commentators has quoted "I think it's hard to force people to live together, and it's natural for people of similar backgrounds and beliefs to want to live as a community."

Whenever Asians in Blackburn begin to move into a particular area in the town, within a short period of time, the whites in the area start to move out (white flight I think they call it).

This is not a phenomena restricted to the communities in Blackburn, go anywhere in the world, and you will find people of similar backgrounds and beliefs wanting to live together as a community.

The British ex-pats all over the world generally live together in their own segregated communities.

So if you accept that segregation is a fact of life no matter what your race, creed or colour, and integration cannot be really be achieved, then how do you prevent communities not understanding or respecting each other, and being mistrustful of each other?

In my humble opinion, the solution is to ensure that there are opportunities for the different communities to regularly interact with each other.

A good starting place is in the schools, and this does not necessarily mean that we close down all the faith schools, or start to engineer integrated schools. There is room in our tolerant society to have successful faith schools and to have children from different schools successfully interacting and working with each other for mutual benefit.

This is really a challenge for the leadership teams in our schools. Judging from some of the comments here, I don't think you can rely on the local authority!
[quote][p][bold]retired one[/bold] wrote: Integration or Segregation? That is the question.[/p][/quote]Unfortunately it is the wrong question. Segregation is a fact of life. As one of the other commentators has quoted "I think it's hard to force people to live together, and it's natural for people of similar backgrounds and beliefs to want to live as a community." Whenever Asians in Blackburn begin to move into a particular area in the town, within a short period of time, the whites in the area start to move out (white flight I think they call it). This is not a phenomena restricted to the communities in Blackburn, go anywhere in the world, and you will find people of similar backgrounds and beliefs wanting to live together as a community. The British ex-pats all over the world generally live together in their own segregated communities. So if you accept that segregation is a fact of life no matter what your race, creed or colour, and integration cannot be really be achieved, then how do you prevent communities not understanding or respecting each other, and being mistrustful of each other? In my humble opinion, the solution is to ensure that there are opportunities for the different communities to regularly interact with each other. A good starting place is in the schools, and this does not necessarily mean that we close down all the faith schools, or start to engineer integrated schools. There is room in our tolerant society to have successful faith schools and to have children from different schools successfully interacting and working with each other for mutual benefit. This is really a challenge for the leadership teams in our schools. Judging from some of the comments here, I don't think you can rely on the local authority! Kingkhan1
  • Score: 0

4:32pm Mon 9 Apr 12

Kingkhan1 says...

jack daniels wrote:
sallythomson wrote:
Lifeinthemix wrote:
StephenDes wrote: Jack - If you think that the simple repetition of certain lies will ensure that, over time, people will start to believe them, you are mistaken. You allege, not for the first time I believe, that there is some form of Qatari and Saudi influence at Tauheedul. This is an absurd, crazy allegation. My online research has revealed that Qatar made a contribution to the construction of the Tauheedul mosque. That is not the school. David Frost, the well-known journalist and interviewer, works for Al-Jazeera, which is based in Qatar; is he now to be viewed with suspicion? The primary school, as with the other schools connected to Tauheedul, will be obliged to follow the national curriculum, and will sit the same public exams that your son successfully sat some time ago. There is no way that the school will be providing an education... 'based upon another country's ideology'. Schools in Britain are very transparent organisations in terms of what is taught, and the financial scrutiny is also strict, rightly so. You can keep throwing this mud around Jack, but I'm afraid it just won't stick.
you are sooo wrong stevy boy so so wrong. transparency is a term not understood by todays teachers http://youtu.be/Eh_O Z1x3nsE i have FOI'd myself to death with the schools particulary Peel park in Accrington, they lie and are then backed by LCC, the police, the firegirls and ICO, so if you are of the mind all is well in the schools, you are those most decieved by the schools and state.
You are correct. We need to sort out the mess in our schools. Our children deserve better. We can not depend on Maureen Bateson.
Or funding from foreign countries; not just here but throughout Europe and north America. Ste, the mosque run the school, based on the same religious teachings. These will be taught to 1000's of children in the west, being taught another way of living. Seriously, are they going to advertise this? Of course not, yet it is not I that isolates my children from other cultures.
Jack, are your allegations based on any facts, or have you just made them up?

I am sure that readers of your comments would welcome any evidence or references that you may have.
[quote][p][bold]jack daniels[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]sallythomson[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Lifeinthemix[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]StephenDes[/bold] wrote: Jack - If you think that the simple repetition of certain lies will ensure that, over time, people will start to believe them, you are mistaken. You allege, not for the first time I believe, that there is some form of Qatari and Saudi influence at Tauheedul. This is an absurd, crazy allegation. My online research has revealed that Qatar made a contribution to the construction of the Tauheedul mosque. That is not the school. David Frost, the well-known journalist and interviewer, works for Al-Jazeera, which is based in Qatar; is he now to be viewed with suspicion? The primary school, as with the other schools connected to Tauheedul, will be obliged to follow the national curriculum, and will sit the same public exams that your son successfully sat some time ago. There is no way that the school will be providing an education... 'based upon another country's ideology'. Schools in Britain are very transparent organisations in terms of what is taught, and the financial scrutiny is also strict, rightly so. You can keep throwing this mud around Jack, but I'm afraid it just won't stick.[/p][/quote]you are sooo wrong stevy boy so so wrong. transparency is a term not understood by todays teachers http://youtu.be/Eh_O Z1x3nsE i have FOI'd myself to death with the schools particulary Peel park in Accrington, they lie and are then backed by LCC, the police, the firegirls and ICO, so if you are of the mind all is well in the schools, you are those most decieved by the schools and state.[/p][/quote]You are correct. We need to sort out the mess in our schools. Our children deserve better. We can not depend on Maureen Bateson.[/p][/quote]Or funding from foreign countries; not just here but throughout Europe and north America. Ste, the mosque run the school, based on the same religious teachings. These will be taught to 1000's of children in the west, being taught another way of living. Seriously, are they going to advertise this? Of course not, yet it is not I that isolates my children from other cultures.[/p][/quote]Jack, are your allegations based on any facts, or have you just made them up? I am sure that readers of your comments would welcome any evidence or references that you may have. Kingkhan1
  • Score: 0

5:36pm Mon 9 Apr 12

StephenDes says...

To those who are worried about religious indoctrination, I say the following -

1]We must not confuse indoctrination with faith. If you believe de facto that all faith is deluded then there is no more to be said, but billions of rational, sane, compassionate people all over the world have a faith. To be indoctrinated is to have a set of beliefs that, despite any blatant evidence to the contrary, fails to meet one's needs. This may, or may not, have a religious element. I am not a fan of wahhabi-based Islam, but equally I am not about to emigrate to North Korea.
2] One thing that unites all autocracies intent on indoctrination is severe limitation in terms of education, allied to massively restricted access to information. They do not want people to be able to think for themselves, or be able to access ideas from elsewhere. Tauheedul seems to be doing the opposite; high standards of education, and thus literacy, enabling its young people to read anything they want, study where they want, live and work where they want. That have in fact equipped them with the tools to be independent thinkers. Muslims in this country cannot be forced to believe, it is not a theocracy.
3] Those of us who do not have a faith, if we are sincere in our desire to create a nation we can all be proud of, must engage fully with people of faith to find common ground. And common ground there most certainly is.
To those who are worried about religious indoctrination, I say the following - 1]We must not confuse indoctrination with faith. If you believe de facto that all faith is deluded then there is no more to be said, but billions of rational, sane, compassionate people all over the world have a faith. To be indoctrinated is to have a set of beliefs that, despite any blatant evidence to the contrary, fails to meet one's needs. This may, or may not, have a religious element. I am not a fan of wahhabi-based Islam, but equally I am not about to emigrate to North Korea. 2] One thing that unites all autocracies intent on indoctrination is severe limitation in terms of education, allied to massively restricted access to information. They do not want people to be able to think for themselves, or be able to access ideas from elsewhere. Tauheedul seems to be doing the opposite; high standards of education, and thus literacy, enabling its young people to read anything they want, study where they want, live and work where they want. That have in fact equipped them with the tools to be independent thinkers. Muslims in this country cannot be forced to believe, it is not a theocracy. 3] Those of us who do not have a faith, if we are sincere in our desire to create a nation we can all be proud of, must engage fully with people of faith to find common ground. And common ground there most certainly is. StephenDes
  • Score: 0

5:56pm Mon 9 Apr 12

sallythomson says...

StephenDes wrote:
To those who are worried about religious indoctrination, I say the following - 1]We must not confuse indoctrination with faith. If you believe de facto that all faith is deluded then there is no more to be said, but billions of rational, sane, compassionate people all over the world have a faith. To be indoctrinated is to have a set of beliefs that, despite any blatant evidence to the contrary, fails to meet one's needs. This may, or may not, have a religious element. I am not a fan of wahhabi-based Islam, but equally I am not about to emigrate to North Korea. 2] One thing that unites all autocracies intent on indoctrination is severe limitation in terms of education, allied to massively restricted access to information. They do not want people to be able to think for themselves, or be able to access ideas from elsewhere. Tauheedul seems to be doing the opposite; high standards of education, and thus literacy, enabling its young people to read anything they want, study where they want, live and work where they want. That have in fact equipped them with the tools to be independent thinkers. Muslims in this country cannot be forced to believe, it is not a theocracy. 3] Those of us who do not have a faith, if we are sincere in our desire to create a nation we can all be proud of, must engage fully with people of faith to find common ground. And common ground there most certainly is.
Excellent points. All the best to any one who wishes to improve the quality of living in Blackburn. Let's work together to ensure that all children in Blackburn get the best possible chance to succeed.
[quote][p][bold]StephenDes[/bold] wrote: To those who are worried about religious indoctrination, I say the following - 1]We must not confuse indoctrination with faith. If you believe de facto that all faith is deluded then there is no more to be said, but billions of rational, sane, compassionate people all over the world have a faith. To be indoctrinated is to have a set of beliefs that, despite any blatant evidence to the contrary, fails to meet one's needs. This may, or may not, have a religious element. I am not a fan of wahhabi-based Islam, but equally I am not about to emigrate to North Korea. 2] One thing that unites all autocracies intent on indoctrination is severe limitation in terms of education, allied to massively restricted access to information. They do not want people to be able to think for themselves, or be able to access ideas from elsewhere. Tauheedul seems to be doing the opposite; high standards of education, and thus literacy, enabling its young people to read anything they want, study where they want, live and work where they want. That have in fact equipped them with the tools to be independent thinkers. Muslims in this country cannot be forced to believe, it is not a theocracy. 3] Those of us who do not have a faith, if we are sincere in our desire to create a nation we can all be proud of, must engage fully with people of faith to find common ground. And common ground there most certainly is.[/p][/quote]Excellent points. All the best to any one who wishes to improve the quality of living in Blackburn. Let's work together to ensure that all children in Blackburn get the best possible chance to succeed. sallythomson
  • Score: 0

6:16pm Mon 9 Apr 12

New World Order. says...

living the end times in BB1 wrote:
The problem, as I see it, is that access to the public spheres, specifically the commercial sphere, often depends on being comfortable with the norms of white society. If a significant number of muslim children aren't comfortable with them, it isn't by choice: It's because they were isolated from those norms. It's one thing for members of the muslim elite upper middle class to choose to retire to predominantly muslim neighborhoods after a lucrative day's work in white British society. It's quite another for people to be unable to enter that commercial sphere because they spent their formative years in a community that didn't, or couldn't, prepare them for it.
Excellent point.
[quote][p][bold]living the end times in BB1[/bold] wrote: The problem, as I see it, is that access to the public spheres, specifically the commercial sphere, often depends on being comfortable with the norms of white society. If a significant number of muslim children aren't comfortable with them, it isn't by choice: It's because they were isolated from those norms. It's one thing for members of the muslim elite upper middle class to choose to retire to predominantly muslim neighborhoods after a lucrative day's work in white British society. It's quite another for people to be unable to enter that commercial sphere because they spent their formative years in a community that didn't, or couldn't, prepare them for it.[/p][/quote]Excellent point. New World Order.
  • Score: 0

6:36pm Mon 9 Apr 12

sallythomson says...

New World Order. wrote:
living the end times in BB1 wrote: The problem, as I see it, is that access to the public spheres, specifically the commercial sphere, often depends on being comfortable with the norms of white society. If a significant number of muslim children aren't comfortable with them, it isn't by choice: It's because they were isolated from those norms. It's one thing for members of the muslim elite upper middle class to choose to retire to predominantly muslim neighborhoods after a lucrative day's work in white British society. It's quite another for people to be unable to enter that commercial sphere because they spent their formative years in a community that didn't, or couldn't, prepare them for it.
Excellent point.
Excellent point, majority of our schools are failing to prepare children for the future of work. Less than 50% of young people in the borough are leaving with 5 good GCSEs. Compare that to Tauheedul where majority of students are leaving with 10 good GCSEs and progressing to universities!!! Unless our young people are litertate they will fail to integrate in to mainstream society. Either we sort out the local school system or we get rid of them through establishing new schools that deliver quality and respond to parental need.
[quote][p][bold]New World Order.[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]living the end times in BB1[/bold] wrote: The problem, as I see it, is that access to the public spheres, specifically the commercial sphere, often depends on being comfortable with the norms of white society. If a significant number of muslim children aren't comfortable with them, it isn't by choice: It's because they were isolated from those norms. It's one thing for members of the muslim elite upper middle class to choose to retire to predominantly muslim neighborhoods after a lucrative day's work in white British society. It's quite another for people to be unable to enter that commercial sphere because they spent their formative years in a community that didn't, or couldn't, prepare them for it.[/p][/quote]Excellent point.[/p][/quote]Excellent point, majority of our schools are failing to prepare children for the future of work. Less than 50% of young people in the borough are leaving with 5 good GCSEs. Compare that to Tauheedul where majority of students are leaving with 10 good GCSEs and progressing to universities!!! Unless our young people are litertate they will fail to integrate in to mainstream society. Either we sort out the local school system or we get rid of them through establishing new schools that deliver quality and respond to parental need. sallythomson
  • Score: 0

7:04pm Mon 9 Apr 12

bmurtaja says...

sallythomson wrote:
StephenDes wrote:
The greatest barriers to being able to being effective in the commercial sphere - according to business leaders - are the lack of such things as literacy, numeracy, creativity, the capacity to take risk, etc... Good schools can make an impact in many of those areas, but not all of them. Their primary function is to make young people as literate and numerate as possible, confident, articulate, polite and respectful. After that, it's up to them. I have no problem whatsoever with the 'muslim elite' living in certain neighborhoods, if that is indeed the case. It's up to them where they choose to live. There are far too many young people from all social backgrounds who render themselves unemployable by lacking the essential skills, plus the necessary spark that employers look for. I don't see what you're getting at by the phrase 'the norms of white society'. I also have a substantially different experience of Muslims being able to function with non-Muslim colleagues. 'White society' is a vast canvas here in the UK, some of which I am personally, as a white man, comfortable with, other aspects not. There are also, lest we fall into the 'us and them' trap that some posters here would seem to embrace, a huge overlap in values that mean can easily function together, whilst accepting certain differences. I think I have virtually nothing in common, for example, with the great majority of the bankers in the City, nearly all of whom appear to be white. I once found myself in a pub with them in London, and found them objectionable in the extreme. I have also come to seriously resent our town centres being ruined by the modern 'binge-drinking' phenomenon, with people swearing, fighting and urinating publicly. I may also add that being on a train with football supporters is not an experience I wish to repeat. If that's white culture, you can keep it. But we don't all have to think alike or behave alike, so I'm just going to have to live with it. The Muslims I know and work with all seem to respect family life, place great emphasis on education, and their houses are spotless. I do not however share their faith, but we just agree to differ. I have friends who are Catholic, and I don't share their faith either. White British people are not a homogenous group if identikit individuals, and neither are Muslims. A genuine respect for different beliefs and lifestyles is all that is needed here; is that really too much to ask?
Excellent points. If this school will help to raise standards in our town then I am all for it.
Agree.
[quote][p][bold]sallythomson[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]StephenDes[/bold] wrote: The greatest barriers to being able to being effective in the commercial sphere - according to business leaders - are the lack of such things as literacy, numeracy, creativity, the capacity to take risk, etc... Good schools can make an impact in many of those areas, but not all of them. Their primary function is to make young people as literate and numerate as possible, confident, articulate, polite and respectful. After that, it's up to them. I have no problem whatsoever with the 'muslim elite' living in certain neighborhoods, if that is indeed the case. It's up to them where they choose to live. There are far too many young people from all social backgrounds who render themselves unemployable by lacking the essential skills, plus the necessary spark that employers [rightly] look for. I don't see what you're getting at by the phrase 'the norms of white society'. I also have a substantially different experience of Muslims being able to function with non-Muslim colleagues. 'White society' is a vast canvas here in the UK, some of which I am personally, as a white man, comfortable with, other aspects not. There are also, lest we fall into the 'us and them' trap that some posters here would seem to embrace, a huge overlap in values that mean can easily function together, whilst accepting certain differences. I think I have virtually nothing in common, for example, with the great majority of the bankers in the City, nearly all of whom appear to be white. I once found myself in a pub with them in London, and found them objectionable in the extreme. I have also come to seriously resent our town centres being ruined by the modern 'binge-drinking' phenomenon, with people swearing, fighting and urinating publicly. I may also add that being on a train with football supporters is not an experience I wish to repeat. If that's white culture, you can keep it. But we don't all have to think alike or behave alike, so I'm just going to have to live with it. The Muslims I know and work with all seem to respect family life, place great emphasis on education, and their houses are spotless. I do not however share their faith, but we just agree to differ. I have friends who are Catholic, and I don't share their faith either. White British people are not a homogenous group if identikit individuals, and neither are Muslims. A genuine respect for different beliefs and lifestyles is all that is needed here; is that really too much to ask?[/p][/quote]Excellent points. If this school will help to raise standards in our town then I am all for it.[/p][/quote]Agree. bmurtaja
  • Score: 0

7:05pm Mon 9 Apr 12

bmurtaja says...

sallythomson wrote:
New World Order. wrote:
living the end times in BB1 wrote: The problem, as I see it, is that access to the public spheres, specifically the commercial sphere, often depends on being comfortable with the norms of white society. If a significant number of muslim children aren't comfortable with them, it isn't by choice: It's because they were isolated from those norms. It's one thing for members of the muslim elite upper middle class to choose to retire to predominantly muslim neighborhoods after a lucrative day's work in white British society. It's quite another for people to be unable to enter that commercial sphere because they spent their formative years in a community that didn't, or couldn't, prepare them for it.
Excellent point.
Excellent point, majority of our schools are failing to prepare children for the future of work. Less than 50% of young people in the borough are leaving with 5 good GCSEs. Compare that to Tauheedul where majority of students are leaving with 10 good GCSEs and progressing to universities!!! Unless our young people are litertate they will fail to integrate in to mainstream society. Either we sort out the local school system or we get rid of them through establishing new schools that deliver quality and respond to parental need.
Very true.
[quote][p][bold]sallythomson[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]New World Order.[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]living the end times in BB1[/bold] wrote: The problem, as I see it, is that access to the public spheres, specifically the commercial sphere, often depends on being comfortable with the norms of white society. If a significant number of muslim children aren't comfortable with them, it isn't by choice: It's because they were isolated from those norms. It's one thing for members of the muslim elite upper middle class to choose to retire to predominantly muslim neighborhoods after a lucrative day's work in white British society. It's quite another for people to be unable to enter that commercial sphere because they spent their formative years in a community that didn't, or couldn't, prepare them for it.[/p][/quote]Excellent point.[/p][/quote]Excellent point, majority of our schools are failing to prepare children for the future of work. Less than 50% of young people in the borough are leaving with 5 good GCSEs. Compare that to Tauheedul where majority of students are leaving with 10 good GCSEs and progressing to universities!!! Unless our young people are litertate they will fail to integrate in to mainstream society. Either we sort out the local school system or we get rid of them through establishing new schools that deliver quality and respond to parental need.[/p][/quote]Very true. bmurtaja
  • Score: 0

7:09pm Mon 9 Apr 12

bmurtaja says...

Stanley fan wrote:
You missed the point -in order to make an informed choice they need to be educated. Tauheedul is providing outstanding education -sadly not many others are. Large numbers of our children are leaving school with little to show for it. That's why Muslim parents have been demanding primary school that will provide the same high quality education they have come to expect from Tauheedul secondary school.
We need more schools like Tauheedul -let's hope they get the go ahead for the primary school and can provide an excellent primary schools - that'll give mediocre primar schools something to think about.
True.
[quote][p][bold]Stanley fan[/bold] wrote: You missed the point -in order to make an informed choice they need to be educated. Tauheedul is providing outstanding education -sadly not many others are. Large numbers of our children are leaving school with little to show for it. That's why Muslim parents have been demanding primary school that will provide the same high quality education they have come to expect from Tauheedul secondary school. We need more schools like Tauheedul -let's hope they get the go ahead for the primary school and can provide an excellent primary schools - that'll give mediocre primar schools something to think about.[/p][/quote]True. bmurtaja
  • Score: 0

7:14pm Mon 9 Apr 12

editor1988 says...

sallythomson wrote:
Icestreng38 wrote:
bmurtaja wrote: This is excellent news for Blackburn. The whole idea of the Free Schools policy is to enable excellent educational providers like Tauheedul to establish schools in places like Blackburn where councillors like Maureen Bateson have failed the local people. You just have to see the state of some of the primary school such as St Stephens and St Silas and the Ofsted inspections and the results speak for themselves. So I hope Tauheedul establish more schools in Blackburn and just as the council was forced to give Blakewater College to Tauheedul, I hope Tauheedul takes more responsibility for schools in Blackburn as the council has failed, and failed for too long. Well done Tauheedul and I am confident your application will be approved by the Department for Education.
The very fact that this school is labelled Muslim immediately identifies it as an exclusive establishment. We already have more than enough faith schools. All our children ought to be able to go through their school life without being influenced one way or another by any religion. The decision about which faith is right for a person can only be made when that person is an adult and has gathered enough experience to make an informed choice. All schools should be secular but should teach about all faiths and religions. The sooner the government prevents all religious organisations from running our schools the better.
Yes, but look at Blackburn. The best schools are faith schools. In fact the majority of primary schools are faith schools.
Agree. It is also important to note that all religions are a group of ideas. Secularism is no different. To somehow believe secularism is the universal and only acceptable ideas is nonesense and against the religious traditions of this country. Therefore, there is no school in the country that can claim it does not offer a set of ideas to pupils.
[quote][p][bold]sallythomson[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Icestreng38[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]bmurtaja[/bold] wrote: This is excellent news for Blackburn. The whole idea of the Free Schools policy is to enable excellent educational providers like Tauheedul to establish schools in places like Blackburn where councillors like Maureen Bateson have failed the local people. You just have to see the state of some of the primary school such as St Stephens and St Silas and the Ofsted inspections and the results speak for themselves. So I hope Tauheedul establish more schools in Blackburn and just as the council was forced to give Blakewater College to Tauheedul, I hope Tauheedul takes more responsibility for schools in Blackburn as the council has failed, and failed for too long. Well done Tauheedul and I am confident your application will be approved by the Department for Education.[/p][/quote]The very fact that this school is labelled Muslim immediately identifies it as an exclusive establishment. We already have more than enough faith schools. All our children ought to be able to go through their school life without being influenced one way or another by any religion. The decision about which faith is right for a person can only be made when that person is an adult and has gathered enough experience to make an informed choice. All schools should be secular but should teach about all faiths and religions. The sooner the government prevents all religious organisations from running our schools the better.[/p][/quote]Yes, but look at Blackburn. The best schools are faith schools. In fact the majority of primary schools are faith schools.[/p][/quote]Agree. It is also important to note that all religions are a group of ideas. Secularism is no different. To somehow believe secularism is the universal and only acceptable ideas is nonesense and against the religious traditions of this country. Therefore, there is no school in the country that can claim it does not offer a set of ideas to pupils. editor1988
  • Score: 0

7:21pm Mon 9 Apr 12

editor1988 says...

karolgadge wrote:
StephenDes makes some excellent points about the proposed Tauheedul 'free school'. I like his style. However, I do not see why he has taken such a dislike to City of London bankers, a sample of whom he has come across in the pub. I've met some City of London bankers too - not in the pub - and do not share his disdain. The ones I met (working for Goldman Sachs) fulfilled all the criteria that he describes as essential in developing a worthwhile education system viz: numerate, literate, confident, polite, articulate and respectful. I suspect that StephenDes is allowing his left-wing objections to what was once described as 'the unacceptable face of capitalism' over-ride his intellectually respectable support for the Tauheedul School. The bigger issues lie not in Tauheedul itself, which has a perfect right to exist under current legislation, plan for its own future and attract pupils from all ethnic groups. The critical questions lie in the educational ideology of David Cameron and Michael Gove. They are extreme radicals in this field, Tory in a totally new sense of the word who wish to dismantle an educational system that has taken more than a hundred years to construct. For the local council who are expected to plan 'logistically' on a playing field where the goal posts are not only constantly moving, but are actually being demolished by the present government, I have a lot of sympathy.
Note that Labour's education policy architect Lord Adonis supports Free Schools. See the Guardian website (the education section)
[quote][p][bold]karolgadge[/bold] wrote: StephenDes makes some excellent points about the proposed Tauheedul 'free school'. I like his style. However, I do not see why he has taken such a dislike to City of London bankers, a sample of whom he has come across in the pub. I've met some City of London bankers too - not in the pub - and do not share his disdain. The ones I met (working for Goldman Sachs) fulfilled all the criteria that he describes as essential in developing a worthwhile education system viz: numerate, literate, confident, polite, articulate and respectful. I suspect that StephenDes is allowing his left-wing objections to what was once described as 'the unacceptable face of capitalism' over-ride his intellectually respectable support for the Tauheedul School. The bigger issues lie not in Tauheedul itself, which has a perfect right to exist under current legislation, plan for its own future and attract pupils from all ethnic groups. The critical questions lie in the educational ideology of David Cameron and Michael Gove. They are extreme radicals in this field, Tory in a totally new sense of the word who wish to dismantle an educational system that has taken more than a hundred years to construct. For the local council who are expected to plan 'logistically' on a playing field where the goal posts are not only constantly moving, but are actually being demolished by the present government, I have a lot of sympathy.[/p][/quote]Note that Labour's education policy architect Lord Adonis supports Free Schools. See the Guardian website (the education section) editor1988
  • Score: 0

7:25pm Mon 9 Apr 12

editor1988 says...

bmurtaja wrote:
Stanley fan wrote: You missed the point -in order to make an informed choice they need to be educated. Tauheedul is providing outstanding education -sadly not many others are. Large numbers of our children are leaving school with little to show for it. That's why Muslim parents have been demanding primary school that will provide the same high quality education they have come to expect from Tauheedul secondary school. We need more schools like Tauheedul -let's hope they get the go ahead for the primary school and can provide an excellent primary schools - that'll give mediocre primar schools something to think about.
True.
Could not agree more.

Lets hope the school opens quick.
[quote][p][bold]bmurtaja[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Stanley fan[/bold] wrote: You missed the point -in order to make an informed choice they need to be educated. Tauheedul is providing outstanding education -sadly not many others are. Large numbers of our children are leaving school with little to show for it. That's why Muslim parents have been demanding primary school that will provide the same high quality education they have come to expect from Tauheedul secondary school. We need more schools like Tauheedul -let's hope they get the go ahead for the primary school and can provide an excellent primary schools - that'll give mediocre primar schools something to think about.[/p][/quote]True.[/p][/quote]Could not agree more. Lets hope the school opens quick. editor1988
  • Score: 0

8:54pm Mon 9 Apr 12

jack daniels says...

editor1988 wrote:
sallythomson wrote:
Icestreng38 wrote:
bmurtaja wrote: This is excellent news for Blackburn. The whole idea of the Free Schools policy is to enable excellent educational providers like Tauheedul to establish schools in places like Blackburn where councillors like Maureen Bateson have failed the local people. You just have to see the state of some of the primary school such as St Stephens and St Silas and the Ofsted inspections and the results speak for themselves. So I hope Tauheedul establish more schools in Blackburn and just as the council was forced to give Blakewater College to Tauheedul, I hope Tauheedul takes more responsibility for schools in Blackburn as the council has failed, and failed for too long. Well done Tauheedul and I am confident your application will be approved by the Department for Education.
The very fact that this school is labelled Muslim immediately identifies it as an exclusive establishment. We already have more than enough faith schools. All our children ought to be able to go through their school life without being influenced one way or another by any religion. The decision about which faith is right for a person can only be made when that person is an adult and has gathered enough experience to make an informed choice. All schools should be secular but should teach about all faiths and religions. The sooner the government prevents all religious organisations from running our schools the better.
Yes, but look at Blackburn. The best schools are faith schools. In fact the majority of primary schools are faith schools.
Agree. It is also important to note that all religions are a group of ideas. Secularism is no different. To somehow believe secularism is the universal and only acceptable ideas is nonesense and against the religious traditions of this country. Therefore, there is no school in the country that can claim it does not offer a set of ideas to pupils.
But secularism will promote independent thought and choice unlike your favourite option which is based on a strict form of Islam.
[quote][p][bold]editor1988[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]sallythomson[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Icestreng38[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]bmurtaja[/bold] wrote: This is excellent news for Blackburn. The whole idea of the Free Schools policy is to enable excellent educational providers like Tauheedul to establish schools in places like Blackburn where councillors like Maureen Bateson have failed the local people. You just have to see the state of some of the primary school such as St Stephens and St Silas and the Ofsted inspections and the results speak for themselves. So I hope Tauheedul establish more schools in Blackburn and just as the council was forced to give Blakewater College to Tauheedul, I hope Tauheedul takes more responsibility for schools in Blackburn as the council has failed, and failed for too long. Well done Tauheedul and I am confident your application will be approved by the Department for Education.[/p][/quote]The very fact that this school is labelled Muslim immediately identifies it as an exclusive establishment. We already have more than enough faith schools. All our children ought to be able to go through their school life without being influenced one way or another by any religion. The decision about which faith is right for a person can only be made when that person is an adult and has gathered enough experience to make an informed choice. All schools should be secular but should teach about all faiths and religions. The sooner the government prevents all religious organisations from running our schools the better.[/p][/quote]Yes, but look at Blackburn. The best schools are faith schools. In fact the majority of primary schools are faith schools.[/p][/quote]Agree. It is also important to note that all religions are a group of ideas. Secularism is no different. To somehow believe secularism is the universal and only acceptable ideas is nonesense and against the religious traditions of this country. Therefore, there is no school in the country that can claim it does not offer a set of ideas to pupils.[/p][/quote]But secularism will promote independent thought and choice unlike your favourite option which is based on a strict form of Islam. jack daniels
  • Score: 0

9:37pm Mon 9 Apr 12

StephenDes says...

You're going too far Jack. How on earth can you extrapolate what I have written to suggest that Tauheedul is '...my favourite option', which is in turn 'a strict form of Islam'. My view is that Tauheedul is an extremely safe bet on raising educational standards in this part of the north-west. If another school has a proven track record and wants to do something similar, then I would support them too. There is not the slightest worry that Tauheedul will promote anything like a 'strict form of Islam'. These are British subjects were are talking about, moreover British young people who live in a pluralistic democracy and will see through archaic and repressive modes of thought and will challenge them. The UK educational system, for all of its faults, actively promotes freedom of thought and expression; Tauheedul, along with all schools, will hold elections for things such as the student council, will be consulted as to what they think of everything from their lessons to their dinners, and will have constant access to the internet to encourage independent study. As a school they have collaborated closely with another secondary school, Blakewater, which I gather has been very fruitful, and Blackburn College. Isolationist it most certainly isn't. To equate the Islam at Tauheedul with anything 'strict' and therefore in your eyes suspicious would be like me equating your secularism with the Soviet Gulags. Your fears, no pun intended of course, are irrational.
You're going too far Jack. How on earth can you extrapolate what I have written to suggest that Tauheedul is '...my favourite option', which is in turn 'a strict form of Islam'. My view is that Tauheedul is an extremely safe bet on raising educational standards in this part of the north-west. If another school has a proven track record and wants to do something similar, then I would support them too. There is not the slightest worry that Tauheedul will promote anything like a 'strict form of Islam'. These are British subjects were are talking about, moreover British young people who live in a pluralistic democracy and will [and do already] see through archaic and repressive modes of thought and will challenge them. The UK educational system, for all of its faults, actively promotes freedom of thought and expression; Tauheedul, along with all schools, will hold elections for things such as the student council, will be consulted as to what they think of everything from their lessons to their dinners, and will have constant access to the internet to encourage independent study. As a school they have collaborated closely with another secondary school, Blakewater, which I gather has been very fruitful, and Blackburn College. Isolationist it most certainly isn't. To equate the Islam at Tauheedul with anything 'strict' and therefore in your eyes suspicious would be like me equating your secularism with the Soviet Gulags. Your fears, no pun intended of course, are irrational. StephenDes
  • Score: 0

9:44pm Mon 9 Apr 12

sallythomson says...

StephenDes wrote:
You're going too far Jack. How on earth can you extrapolate what I have written to suggest that Tauheedul is '...my favourite option', which is in turn 'a strict form of Islam'. My view is that Tauheedul is an extremely safe bet on raising educational standards in this part of the north-west. If another school has a proven track record and wants to do something similar, then I would support them too. There is not the slightest worry that Tauheedul will promote anything like a 'strict form of Islam'. These are British subjects were are talking about, moreover British young people who live in a pluralistic democracy and will see through archaic and repressive modes of thought and will challenge them. The UK educational system, for all of its faults, actively promotes freedom of thought and expression; Tauheedul, along with all schools, will hold elections for things such as the student council, will be consulted as to what they think of everything from their lessons to their dinners, and will have constant access to the internet to encourage independent study. As a school they have collaborated closely with another secondary school, Blakewater, which I gather has been very fruitful, and Blackburn College. Isolationist it most certainly isn't. To equate the Islam at Tauheedul with anything 'strict' and therefore in your eyes suspicious would be like me equating your secularism with the Soviet Gulags. Your fears, no pun intended of course, are irrational.
Thanks Stephen. I agree with you entirely. After researching their materials it is clear that their girls school is in a league of its own. We have no reasons to dobut that this will also be the case in the new primary school. I would like to see Tauheedul extend its work and partnerships to other schools in the borough so that we all benefit from their expertise of delivering quality educational provision.
[quote][p][bold]StephenDes[/bold] wrote: You're going too far Jack. How on earth can you extrapolate what I have written to suggest that Tauheedul is '...my favourite option', which is in turn 'a strict form of Islam'. My view is that Tauheedul is an extremely safe bet on raising educational standards in this part of the north-west. If another school has a proven track record and wants to do something similar, then I would support them too. There is not the slightest worry that Tauheedul will promote anything like a 'strict form of Islam'. These are British subjects were are talking about, moreover British young people who live in a pluralistic democracy and will [and do already] see through archaic and repressive modes of thought and will challenge them. The UK educational system, for all of its faults, actively promotes freedom of thought and expression; Tauheedul, along with all schools, will hold elections for things such as the student council, will be consulted as to what they think of everything from their lessons to their dinners, and will have constant access to the internet to encourage independent study. As a school they have collaborated closely with another secondary school, Blakewater, which I gather has been very fruitful, and Blackburn College. Isolationist it most certainly isn't. To equate the Islam at Tauheedul with anything 'strict' and therefore in your eyes suspicious would be like me equating your secularism with the Soviet Gulags. Your fears, no pun intended of course, are irrational.[/p][/quote]Thanks Stephen. I agree with you entirely. After researching their materials it is clear that their girls school is in a league of its own. We have no reasons to dobut that this will also be the case in the new primary school. I would like to see Tauheedul extend its work and partnerships to other schools in the borough so that we all benefit from their expertise of delivering quality educational provision. sallythomson
  • Score: 0

12:29am Tue 10 Apr 12

nice person says...

editor1988 wrote:
sallythomson wrote:
Icestreng38 wrote:
bmurtaja wrote: This is excellent news for Blackburn. The whole idea of the Free Schools policy is to enable excellent educational providers like Tauheedul to establish schools in places like Blackburn where councillors like Maureen Bateson have failed the local people. You just have to see the state of some of the primary school such as St Stephens and St Silas and the Ofsted inspections and the results speak for themselves. So I hope Tauheedul establish more schools in Blackburn and just as the council was forced to give Blakewater College to Tauheedul, I hope Tauheedul takes more responsibility for schools in Blackburn as the council has failed, and failed for too long. Well done Tauheedul and I am confident your application will be approved by the Department for Education.
The very fact that this school is labelled Muslim immediately identifies it as an exclusive establishment. We already have more than enough faith schools. All our children ought to be able to go through their school life without being influenced one way or another by any religion. The decision about which faith is right for a person can only be made when that person is an adult and has gathered enough experience to make an informed choice. All schools should be secular but should teach about all faiths and religions. The sooner the government prevents all religious organisations from running our schools the better.
Yes, but look at Blackburn. The best schools are faith schools. In fact the majority of primary schools are faith schools.
Agree. It is also important to note that all religions are a group of ideas. Secularism is no different. To somehow believe secularism is the universal and only acceptable ideas is nonesense and against the religious traditions of this country. Therefore, there is no school in the country that can claim it does not offer a set of ideas to pupils.
The true religion of this country is Pagan,and we live in a democratic society or should under common law rule.Sharia Law will never be accepted and that is why vast parts of this country are being exploited and manipulated in one form or another,this is just another example of manipulation into the muslim north we now find ourselves living in,or should i say existing in?Our schools were good enough to gain the educations in the first place over the years,everything now is calculated as is this and so will be the next and next.Continual growth and expansion as in conquer and divide.
[quote][p][bold]editor1988[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]sallythomson[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Icestreng38[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]bmurtaja[/bold] wrote: This is excellent news for Blackburn. The whole idea of the Free Schools policy is to enable excellent educational providers like Tauheedul to establish schools in places like Blackburn where councillors like Maureen Bateson have failed the local people. You just have to see the state of some of the primary school such as St Stephens and St Silas and the Ofsted inspections and the results speak for themselves. So I hope Tauheedul establish more schools in Blackburn and just as the council was forced to give Blakewater College to Tauheedul, I hope Tauheedul takes more responsibility for schools in Blackburn as the council has failed, and failed for too long. Well done Tauheedul and I am confident your application will be approved by the Department for Education.[/p][/quote]The very fact that this school is labelled Muslim immediately identifies it as an exclusive establishment. We already have more than enough faith schools. All our children ought to be able to go through their school life without being influenced one way or another by any religion. The decision about which faith is right for a person can only be made when that person is an adult and has gathered enough experience to make an informed choice. All schools should be secular but should teach about all faiths and religions. The sooner the government prevents all religious organisations from running our schools the better.[/p][/quote]Yes, but look at Blackburn. The best schools are faith schools. In fact the majority of primary schools are faith schools.[/p][/quote]Agree. It is also important to note that all religions are a group of ideas. Secularism is no different. To somehow believe secularism is the universal and only acceptable ideas is nonesense and against the religious traditions of this country. Therefore, there is no school in the country that can claim it does not offer a set of ideas to pupils.[/p][/quote]The true religion of this country is Pagan,and we live in a democratic society or should under common law rule.Sharia Law will never be accepted and that is why vast parts of this country are being exploited and manipulated in one form or another,this is just another example of manipulation into the muslim north we now find ourselves living in,or should i say existing in?Our schools were good enough to gain the educations in the first place over the years,everything now is calculated as is this and so will be the next and next.Continual growth and expansion as in conquer and divide. nice person
  • Score: 0

8:59pm Tue 10 Apr 12

Icestreng38 says...

jack daniels wrote:
editor1988 wrote:
sallythomson wrote:
Icestreng38 wrote:
bmurtaja wrote: This is excellent news for Blackburn. The whole idea of the Free Schools policy is to enable excellent educational providers like Tauheedul to establish schools in places like Blackburn where councillors like Maureen Bateson have failed the local people. You just have to see the state of some of the primary school such as St Stephens and St Silas and the Ofsted inspections and the results speak for themselves. So I hope Tauheedul establish more schools in Blackburn and just as the council was forced to give Blakewater College to Tauheedul, I hope Tauheedul takes more responsibility for schools in Blackburn as the council has failed, and failed for too long. Well done Tauheedul and I am confident your application will be approved by the Department for Education.
The very fact that this school is labelled Muslim immediately identifies it as an exclusive establishment. We already have more than enough faith schools. All our children ought to be able to go through their school life without being influenced one way or another by any religion. The decision about which faith is right for a person can only be made when that person is an adult and has gathered enough experience to make an informed choice. All schools should be secular but should teach about all faiths and religions. The sooner the government prevents all religious organisations from running our schools the better.
Yes, but look at Blackburn. The best schools are faith schools. In fact the majority of primary schools are faith schools.
Agree. It is also important to note that all religions are a group of ideas. Secularism is no different. To somehow believe secularism is the universal and only acceptable ideas is nonesense and against the religious traditions of this country. Therefore, there is no school in the country that can claim it does not offer a set of ideas to pupils.
But secularism will promote independent thought and choice unlike your favourite option which is based on a strict form of Islam.
Secularism is an indifference to organised religion rather than a belief unlike atheism. The national health service is in effect a secular organisation and as such any person can expect the same treatment regardless of religious,ethnic,sex
ual or political persuasion.  Any one can get in. There are no obstacles other than a requirement to be a citizen of the united kingdom. There is no reason why the department of education could not operate an a similar basis. Any school managed by a religious organisation restricts access based on things like church attendance. This is despite the school funding coming from the tax payer, all tax payers,  religious, atheistic, agnostic or otherwise. As all taxpayers fund schools it would be more equitable if religion was excluded from the decisions about access and about the curriculum.
[quote][p][bold]jack daniels[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]editor1988[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]sallythomson[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Icestreng38[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]bmurtaja[/bold] wrote: This is excellent news for Blackburn. The whole idea of the Free Schools policy is to enable excellent educational providers like Tauheedul to establish schools in places like Blackburn where councillors like Maureen Bateson have failed the local people. You just have to see the state of some of the primary school such as St Stephens and St Silas and the Ofsted inspections and the results speak for themselves. So I hope Tauheedul establish more schools in Blackburn and just as the council was forced to give Blakewater College to Tauheedul, I hope Tauheedul takes more responsibility for schools in Blackburn as the council has failed, and failed for too long. Well done Tauheedul and I am confident your application will be approved by the Department for Education.[/p][/quote]The very fact that this school is labelled Muslim immediately identifies it as an exclusive establishment. We already have more than enough faith schools. All our children ought to be able to go through their school life without being influenced one way or another by any religion. The decision about which faith is right for a person can only be made when that person is an adult and has gathered enough experience to make an informed choice. All schools should be secular but should teach about all faiths and religions. The sooner the government prevents all religious organisations from running our schools the better.[/p][/quote]Yes, but look at Blackburn. The best schools are faith schools. In fact the majority of primary schools are faith schools.[/p][/quote]Agree. It is also important to note that all religions are a group of ideas. Secularism is no different. To somehow believe secularism is the universal and only acceptable ideas is nonesense and against the religious traditions of this country. Therefore, there is no school in the country that can claim it does not offer a set of ideas to pupils.[/p][/quote]But secularism will promote independent thought and choice unlike your favourite option which is based on a strict form of Islam.[/p][/quote]Secularism is an indifference to organised religion rather than a belief unlike atheism. The national health service is in effect a secular organisation and as such any person can expect the same treatment regardless of religious,ethnic,sex ual or political persuasion.  Any one can get in. There are no obstacles other than a requirement to be a citizen of the united kingdom. There is no reason why the department of education could not operate an a similar basis. Any school managed by a religious organisation restricts access based on things like church attendance. This is despite the school funding coming from the tax payer, all tax payers,  religious, atheistic, agnostic or otherwise. As all taxpayers fund schools it would be more equitable if religion was excluded from the decisions about access and about the curriculum. Icestreng38
  • Score: 0

11:18pm Tue 10 Apr 12

Graham Hartley says...

Icestreng38 wrote:
jack daniels wrote:
editor1988 wrote:
sallythomson wrote:
Icestreng38 wrote:
bmurtaja wrote: This is excellent news for Blackburn. The whole idea of the Free Schools policy is to enable excellent educational providers like Tauheedul to establish schools in places like Blackburn where councillors like Maureen Bateson have failed the local people. You just have to see the state of some of the primary school such as St Stephens and St Silas and the Ofsted inspections and the results speak for themselves. So I hope Tauheedul establish more schools in Blackburn and just as the council was forced to give Blakewater College to Tauheedul, I hope Tauheedul takes more responsibility for schools in Blackburn as the council has failed, and failed for too long. Well done Tauheedul and I am confident your application will be approved by the Department for Education.
The very fact that this school is labelled Muslim immediately identifies it as an exclusive establishment. We already have more than enough faith schools. All our children ought to be able to go through their school life without being influenced one way or another by any religion. The decision about which faith is right for a person can only be made when that person is an adult and has gathered enough experience to make an informed choice. All schools should be secular but should teach about all faiths and religions. The sooner the government prevents all religious organisations from running our schools the better.
Yes, but look at Blackburn. The best schools are faith schools. In fact the majority of primary schools are faith schools.
Agree. It is also important to note that all religions are a group of ideas. Secularism is no different. To somehow believe secularism is the universal and only acceptable ideas is nonesense and against the religious traditions of this country. Therefore, there is no school in the country that can claim it does not offer a set of ideas to pupils.
But secularism will promote independent thought and choice unlike your favourite option which is based on a strict form of Islam.
Secularism is an indifference to organised religion rather than a belief unlike atheism. The national health service is in effect a secular organisation and as such any person can expect the same treatment regardless of religious,ethnic,sex

ual or political persuasion.  Any one can get in. There are no obstacles other than a requirement to be a citizen of the united kingdom. There is no reason why the department of education could not operate an a similar basis. Any school managed by a religious organisation restricts access based on things like church attendance. This is despite the school funding coming from the tax payer, all tax payers,  religious, atheistic, agnostic or otherwise. As all taxpayers fund schools it would be more equitable if religion was excluded from the decisions about access and about the curriculum.
I suspect that no-one knows why faith schools perform so well, and I further suspect that this is an important consideration in the decision not to change admission policies in the way you suggest, whatever the appeal of the arguments from taxation.
[quote][p][bold]Icestreng38[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]jack daniels[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]editor1988[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]sallythomson[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Icestreng38[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]bmurtaja[/bold] wrote: This is excellent news for Blackburn. The whole idea of the Free Schools policy is to enable excellent educational providers like Tauheedul to establish schools in places like Blackburn where councillors like Maureen Bateson have failed the local people. You just have to see the state of some of the primary school such as St Stephens and St Silas and the Ofsted inspections and the results speak for themselves. So I hope Tauheedul establish more schools in Blackburn and just as the council was forced to give Blakewater College to Tauheedul, I hope Tauheedul takes more responsibility for schools in Blackburn as the council has failed, and failed for too long. Well done Tauheedul and I am confident your application will be approved by the Department for Education.[/p][/quote]The very fact that this school is labelled Muslim immediately identifies it as an exclusive establishment. We already have more than enough faith schools. All our children ought to be able to go through their school life without being influenced one way or another by any religion. The decision about which faith is right for a person can only be made when that person is an adult and has gathered enough experience to make an informed choice. All schools should be secular but should teach about all faiths and religions. The sooner the government prevents all religious organisations from running our schools the better.[/p][/quote]Yes, but look at Blackburn. The best schools are faith schools. In fact the majority of primary schools are faith schools.[/p][/quote]Agree. It is also important to note that all religions are a group of ideas. Secularism is no different. To somehow believe secularism is the universal and only acceptable ideas is nonesense and against the religious traditions of this country. Therefore, there is no school in the country that can claim it does not offer a set of ideas to pupils.[/p][/quote]But secularism will promote independent thought and choice unlike your favourite option which is based on a strict form of Islam.[/p][/quote]Secularism is an indifference to organised religion rather than a belief unlike atheism. The national health service is in effect a secular organisation and as such any person can expect the same treatment regardless of religious,ethnic,sex ual or political persuasion.  Any one can get in. There are no obstacles other than a requirement to be a citizen of the united kingdom. There is no reason why the department of education could not operate an a similar basis. Any school managed by a religious organisation restricts access based on things like church attendance. This is despite the school funding coming from the tax payer, all tax payers,  religious, atheistic, agnostic or otherwise. As all taxpayers fund schools it would be more equitable if religion was excluded from the decisions about access and about the curriculum.[/p][/quote]I suspect that no-one knows why faith schools perform so well, and I further suspect that this is an important consideration in the decision not to change admission policies in the way you suggest, whatever the appeal of the arguments from taxation. Graham Hartley
  • Score: 0

1:24pm Wed 11 Apr 12

Coeur de Lion says...

bnp_fan wrote:
Coeur de Lion wrote:
ghanto wrote:
Some comments here are from people who wants publicity from this free mosque

Mosques and school are there to learn and NOT "hear and go" like free foods speach

People goes to mosques like showing very religious but dont learn anything

As soon as they come out they start bnackbiting outside the mosques itself

True and genuine old islam does no longer exists and modern islam
and new rules are made.

Whatever people likes is made islamic and what they dont like is not classed as none-islamic

admit it
I take it you never attended a school that taught ENGLISH. It is little wonder most Asians are unemployable when they attend Muslim schools.
Quite the opposite. Ghanto did not come to Tauheedul. As one of the best schools in the country, students leave with the best chances of success and gain entry into the best universities.
In todays news a fee paying muslim school is opening in Birmingham, this is the same school that was investigated in a channel 4 documentary for teaching hatred of non muslims and homosexuals, the primary language taught will be Arabic and the pupils will be made to wear traditional asian uniforms. Intergration don't make me laugh.
[quote][p][bold]bnp_fan[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Coeur de Lion[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]ghanto[/bold] wrote: Some comments here are from people who wants publicity from this free mosque Mosques and school are there to learn and NOT "hear and go" like free foods speach People goes to mosques like showing very religious but dont learn anything As soon as they come out they start bnackbiting outside the mosques itself True and genuine old islam does no longer exists and modern islam and new rules are made. Whatever people likes is made islamic and what they dont like is not classed as none-islamic admit it[/p][/quote]I take it you never attended a school that taught ENGLISH. It is little wonder most Asians are unemployable when they attend Muslim schools.[/p][/quote]Quite the opposite. Ghanto did not come to Tauheedul. As one of the best schools in the country, students leave with the best chances of success and gain entry into the best universities.[/p][/quote]In todays news a fee paying muslim school is opening in Birmingham, this is the same school that was investigated in a channel 4 documentary for teaching hatred of non muslims and homosexuals, the primary language taught will be Arabic and the pupils will be made to wear traditional asian uniforms. Intergration don't make me laugh. Coeur de Lion
  • Score: 0

4:27pm Wed 11 Apr 12

StephenDes says...

If that's the case, then that's shocking. Fee paying schools are also inspected, and if what is alleged here is going on, then they will be in serious trouble. The point about Tauheedul is that it is precisely because it is a part of the state sector, that these things could not possibly happen. The fact that the governors at the school actually want to be a part of the system as opposed to outside it, is that they are transparently rejecting the type of Islam that is sadly being taught at this Birmingham institution. The two are worlds apart, one is embracing the wider British establishment, the other is moving away. Tauheedul employs a number of non-Muslims I gather, and the future primary school will accept up to 50% non-Muslim students. I don't sense any rejection of the wider community here.
If that's the case, then that's shocking. Fee paying schools are also inspected, and if what is alleged here is going on, then they will be in serious trouble. The point about Tauheedul is that it is precisely because it is a part of the state sector, that these things could not possibly happen. The fact that the governors at the school actually want to be a part of the system as opposed to outside it, is that they are transparently rejecting the type of Islam that is sadly being taught at this Birmingham institution. The two are worlds apart, one is embracing the wider British establishment, the other is moving away. Tauheedul employs a number of non-Muslims I gather, and the future primary school will accept up to 50% non-Muslim students. I don't sense any rejection of the wider community here. StephenDes
  • Score: 0

8:05pm Wed 11 Apr 12

Icestreng38 says...

StephenDes wrote:
If that's the case, then that's shocking. Fee paying schools are also inspected, and if what is alleged here is going on, then they will be in serious trouble. The point about Tauheedul is that it is precisely because it is a part of the state sector, that these things could not possibly happen. The fact that the governors at the school actually want to be a part of the system as opposed to outside it, is that they are transparently rejecting the type of Islam that is sadly being taught at this Birmingham institution. The two are worlds apart, one is embracing the wider British establishment, the other is moving away. Tauheedul employs a number of non-Muslims I gather, and the future primary school will accept up to 50% non-Muslim students. I don't sense any rejection of the wider community here.
By your logic Muslims represent 50% of the population.
[quote][p][bold]StephenDes[/bold] wrote: If that's the case, then that's shocking. Fee paying schools are also inspected, and if what is alleged here is going on, then they will be in serious trouble. The point about Tauheedul is that it is precisely because it is a part of the state sector, that these things could not possibly happen. The fact that the governors at the school actually want to be a part of the system as opposed to outside it, is that they are transparently rejecting the type of Islam that is sadly being taught at this Birmingham institution. The two are worlds apart, one is embracing the wider British establishment, the other is moving away. Tauheedul employs a number of non-Muslims I gather, and the future primary school will accept up to 50% non-Muslim students. I don't sense any rejection of the wider community here.[/p][/quote]By your logic Muslims represent 50% of the population. Icestreng38
  • Score: 0

8:05pm Wed 11 Apr 12

Icestreng38 says...

StephenDes wrote:
If that's the case, then that's shocking. Fee paying schools are also inspected, and if what is alleged here is going on, then they will be in serious trouble. The point about Tauheedul is that it is precisely because it is a part of the state sector, that these things could not possibly happen. The fact that the governors at the school actually want to be a part of the system as opposed to outside it, is that they are transparently rejecting the type of Islam that is sadly being taught at this Birmingham institution. The two are worlds apart, one is embracing the wider British establishment, the other is moving away. Tauheedul employs a number of non-Muslims I gather, and the future primary school will accept up to 50% non-Muslim students. I don't sense any rejection of the wider community here.
By your logic Muslims represent 50% of the population.
[quote][p][bold]StephenDes[/bold] wrote: If that's the case, then that's shocking. Fee paying schools are also inspected, and if what is alleged here is going on, then they will be in serious trouble. The point about Tauheedul is that it is precisely because it is a part of the state sector, that these things could not possibly happen. The fact that the governors at the school actually want to be a part of the system as opposed to outside it, is that they are transparently rejecting the type of Islam that is sadly being taught at this Birmingham institution. The two are worlds apart, one is embracing the wider British establishment, the other is moving away. Tauheedul employs a number of non-Muslims I gather, and the future primary school will accept up to 50% non-Muslim students. I don't sense any rejection of the wider community here.[/p][/quote]By your logic Muslims represent 50% of the population. Icestreng38
  • Score: 0

8:06pm Wed 11 Apr 12

bmurtaja says...

StephenDes wrote:
If that's the case, then that's shocking. Fee paying schools are also inspected, and if what is alleged here is going on, then they will be in serious trouble. The point about Tauheedul is that it is precisely because it is a part of the state sector, that these things could not possibly happen. The fact that the governors at the school actually want to be a part of the system as opposed to outside it, is that they are transparently rejecting the type of Islam that is sadly being taught at this Birmingham institution. The two are worlds apart, one is embracing the wider British establishment, the other is moving away. Tauheedul employs a number of non-Muslims I gather, and the future primary school will accept up to 50% non-Muslim students. I don't sense any rejection of the wider community here.
True. Tauheedul is progressive.
[quote][p][bold]StephenDes[/bold] wrote: If that's the case, then that's shocking. Fee paying schools are also inspected, and if what is alleged here is going on, then they will be in serious trouble. The point about Tauheedul is that it is precisely because it is a part of the state sector, that these things could not possibly happen. The fact that the governors at the school actually want to be a part of the system as opposed to outside it, is that they are transparently rejecting the type of Islam that is sadly being taught at this Birmingham institution. The two are worlds apart, one is embracing the wider British establishment, the other is moving away. Tauheedul employs a number of non-Muslims I gather, and the future primary school will accept up to 50% non-Muslim students. I don't sense any rejection of the wider community here.[/p][/quote]True. Tauheedul is progressive. bmurtaja
  • Score: 0

8:55pm Wed 11 Apr 12

Icestreng38 says...

All religious schools exclude the wider community by imposing restrictions on entry. A 50% non Muslim entry implies 50% Muslim entry. This could only possibly be fair in a country with 50% Muslim population.
All religious schools exclude the wider community by imposing restrictions on entry. A 50% non Muslim entry implies 50% Muslim entry. This could only possibly be fair in a country with 50% Muslim population. Icestreng38
  • Score: 0

9:10pm Wed 11 Apr 12

Graham Hartley says...

Icestreng38 wrote:
All religious schools exclude the wider community by imposing restrictions on entry. A 50% non Muslim entry implies 50% Muslim entry. This could only possibly be fair in a country with 50% Muslim population.
50% non-Muslim does not imply 50% Muslim, so the remainder of the reasoning is faulty.
[quote][p][bold]Icestreng38[/bold] wrote: All religious schools exclude the wider community by imposing restrictions on entry. A 50% non Muslim entry implies 50% Muslim entry. This could only possibly be fair in a country with 50% Muslim population.[/p][/quote]50% non-Muslim does not imply 50% Muslim, so the remainder of the reasoning is faulty. Graham Hartley
  • Score: 0

3:00pm Thu 12 Apr 12

sallythomson says...

Graham Hartley wrote:
Icestreng38 wrote: All religious schools exclude the wider community by imposing restrictions on entry. A 50% non Muslim entry implies 50% Muslim entry. This could only possibly be fair in a country with 50% Muslim population.
50% non-Muslim does not imply 50% Muslim, so the remainder of the reasoning is faulty.
I am not interested in the stuff about faith schools. It is an old debate. These schools are here to stay. And there is no reason why the muslim community should not be able to open a Muslim faith school. Same arguments around community cohesion apply to all faith schools. However, the real point of concern for me is the quality of education in this town. We need to challenge Blackburn Council - for too long we have been fed misleading stats re school performance by the Borough....
[quote][p][bold]Graham Hartley[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Icestreng38[/bold] wrote: All religious schools exclude the wider community by imposing restrictions on entry. A 50% non Muslim entry implies 50% Muslim entry. This could only possibly be fair in a country with 50% Muslim population.[/p][/quote]50% non-Muslim does not imply 50% Muslim, so the remainder of the reasoning is faulty.[/p][/quote]I am not interested in the stuff about faith schools. It is an old debate. These schools are here to stay. And there is no reason why the muslim community should not be able to open a Muslim faith school. Same arguments around community cohesion apply to all faith schools. However, the real point of concern for me is the quality of education in this town. We need to challenge Blackburn Council - for too long we have been fed misleading stats re school performance by the Borough.... sallythomson
  • Score: 0

3:03pm Thu 12 Apr 12

sallythomson says...

Graham Hartley wrote:
Icestreng38 wrote: All religious schools exclude the wider community by imposing restrictions on entry. A 50% non Muslim entry implies 50% Muslim entry. This could only possibly be fair in a country with 50% Muslim population.
50% non-Muslim does not imply 50% Muslim, so the remainder of the reasoning is faulty.
Agree - all free schools are required to open up their admissions to people of other faiths. This is not the case with voluntary aided schools.
[quote][p][bold]Graham Hartley[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Icestreng38[/bold] wrote: All religious schools exclude the wider community by imposing restrictions on entry. A 50% non Muslim entry implies 50% Muslim entry. This could only possibly be fair in a country with 50% Muslim population.[/p][/quote]50% non-Muslim does not imply 50% Muslim, so the remainder of the reasoning is faulty.[/p][/quote]Agree - all free schools are required to open up their admissions to people of other faiths. This is not the case with voluntary aided schools. sallythomson
  • Score: 0

6:11pm Thu 12 Apr 12

StephenDes says...

Just to clear a few things up...

1] Icestreng's comments about my logic implying that '50% of the population is Muslim' is of course nonsense. In some inner-city/urban areas of Britain that is however the case, and given that the catchment areas for primary schools is not very large, to have that proportion of students as Muslim is very fair. If the school were to be located somewhere in the Lake District then certainly that might appear bizarre, but it isn't. It's a local school meeting local needs. Is that such a bad thing?
2] I welcome some contributions to the debate which have re-focused on the issue of educational standards. Given the strength of feeling from some contributors against the primary school, one might have the impression that all is rosy with educational standards in schools in general, and with primary schools in Blackburn in particular. On most other days of the week people are regularly posting comments relating to poor standards of behaviour from our young people, and the poor levels of literacy amongst our school leavers. This new primary school is a serious, genuine attempt to address both of those issues, not just for the children concerned but, in the long term, for the town as a whole.
Just to clear a few things up... 1] Icestreng's comments about my logic implying that '50% of the population is Muslim' is of course nonsense. In some inner-city/urban areas of Britain that is however the case, and given that the catchment areas for primary schools is not very large, to have that proportion of students as Muslim is very fair. If the school were to be located somewhere in the Lake District then certainly that might appear bizarre, but it isn't. It's a local school meeting local needs. Is that such a bad thing? 2] I welcome some contributions to the debate which have re-focused on the issue of educational standards. Given the strength of feeling from some contributors against the primary school, one might have the impression that all is rosy with educational standards in schools in general, and with primary schools in Blackburn in particular. On most other days of the week people are regularly posting comments relating to poor standards of behaviour from our young people, and the poor levels of literacy amongst our school leavers. This new primary school is a serious, genuine attempt to address both of those issues, not just for the children concerned but, in the long term, for the town as a whole. StephenDes
  • Score: 0

11:27am Fri 13 Apr 12

Icestreng38 says...

I understand the argument about having a greater Muslim entry into a particular school where the local population is substantially Muslim. However under those circumstances the Breyer Muslim intake would happen naturally without the school being identified as Muslim. I don't have a problem with children from one particular community all going to one school. I simply have a problem with any school
excluding any pupil on the grounds of religion which should have nothing to do with education. Any school which is designated Muslim or code or catholic will select pupils on religious grounds.
I understand the argument about having a greater Muslim entry into a particular school where the local population is substantially Muslim. However under those circumstances the Breyer Muslim intake would happen naturally without the school being identified as Muslim. I don't have a problem with children from one particular community all going to one school. I simply have a problem with any school excluding any pupil on the grounds of religion which should have nothing to do with education. Any school which is designated Muslim or code or catholic will select pupils on religious grounds. Icestreng38
  • Score: 0

4:13pm Fri 13 Apr 12

sallythomson says...

Icestreng38 wrote:
I understand the argument about having a greater Muslim entry into a particular school where the local population is substantially Muslim. However under those circumstances the Breyer Muslim intake would happen naturally without the school being identified as Muslim. I don't have a problem with children from one particular community all going to one school. I simply have a problem with any school excluding any pupil on the grounds of religion which should have nothing to do with education. Any school which is designated Muslim or code or catholic will select pupils on religious grounds.
Agree, however, faith schools are here to exist. It just isnt possible to shut them down. In the absence of good community schools they will continue to expand. All the best to this new school and any others that improve quality of education in the town.
[quote][p][bold]Icestreng38[/bold] wrote: I understand the argument about having a greater Muslim entry into a particular school where the local population is substantially Muslim. However under those circumstances the Breyer Muslim intake would happen naturally without the school being identified as Muslim. I don't have a problem with children from one particular community all going to one school. I simply have a problem with any school excluding any pupil on the grounds of religion which should have nothing to do with education. Any school which is designated Muslim or code or catholic will select pupils on religious grounds.[/p][/quote]Agree, however, faith schools are here to exist. It just isnt possible to shut them down. In the absence of good community schools they will continue to expand. All the best to this new school and any others that improve quality of education in the town. sallythomson
  • Score: 0

8:48pm Fri 13 Apr 12

Graham Hartley says...

Icy, I can agree with your view that '...religion (which) should have nothing to do with education.' if you mean the view of religion promoted by any particular branch of faith. This is best developed at home, and quite why schools need to be involved is wanting explanation. Yet religious education, the study of religion as a phenomenon and which includes a variety of analyses is as welcome in any school as is, say mathematics because such an approach has rigour and reveals much about the human condition.
Icy, I can agree with your view that '...religion (which) should have nothing to do with education.' if you mean the view of religion promoted by any particular branch of faith. This is best developed at home, and quite why schools need to be involved is wanting explanation. Yet religious education, the study of religion as a phenomenon and which includes a variety of analyses is as welcome in any school as is, say mathematics because such an approach has rigour and reveals much about the human condition. Graham Hartley
  • Score: 0

12:32am Sat 14 Apr 12

bmurtaja says...

sallythomson wrote:
Icestreng38 wrote:
I understand the argument about having a greater Muslim entry into a particular school where the local population is substantially Muslim. However under those circumstances the Breyer Muslim intake would happen naturally without the school being identified as Muslim. I don't have a problem with children from one particular community all going to one school. I simply have a problem with any school excluding any pupil on the grounds of religion which should have nothing to do with education. Any school which is designated Muslim or code or catholic will select pupils on religious grounds.
Agree, however, faith schools are here to exist. It just isnt possible to shut them down. In the absence of good community schools they will continue to expand. All the best to this new school and any others that improve quality of education in the town.
Agree. Parental choice is key and should underpin our thinking. If secularism is about forcing secularism, then this is the other side to imposing religion. Parental choice is key and there should be no compulsion on both ends. So, if Tauheedul has the demand, which it surely has as reflected in the fact that it is heavily oversubscribed, then let it open and let the parental choice and demand manifest into reality.
[quote][p][bold]sallythomson[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Icestreng38[/bold] wrote: I understand the argument about having a greater Muslim entry into a particular school where the local population is substantially Muslim. However under those circumstances the Breyer Muslim intake would happen naturally without the school being identified as Muslim. I don't have a problem with children from one particular community all going to one school. I simply have a problem with any school excluding any pupil on the grounds of religion which should have nothing to do with education. Any school which is designated Muslim or code or catholic will select pupils on religious grounds.[/p][/quote]Agree, however, faith schools are here to exist. It just isnt possible to shut them down. In the absence of good community schools they will continue to expand. All the best to this new school and any others that improve quality of education in the town.[/p][/quote]Agree. Parental choice is key and should underpin our thinking. If secularism is about forcing secularism, then this is the other side to imposing religion. Parental choice is key and there should be no compulsion on both ends. So, if Tauheedul has the demand, which it surely has as reflected in the fact that it is heavily oversubscribed, then let it open and let the parental choice and demand manifest into reality. bmurtaja
  • Score: 0

10:46am Mon 16 Apr 12

karolgadge says...

I have followed this stimulating debate with great interest.
One of the issues that has received surprisingly little attention is the wider impact that the free school movement will have in future years.
The call of 'raising educational standards' is repeated so often without clear definition that it seems many correspondents are parroting the speeches of Michael Gove.
No-one in their right minds would deny that standards need to be raised - but it is the method of raising them through central educational policy that needs to be addressed as well as how an individual free school meets parental demand.

The government's insistence on maintaining a curriculum straitjacket when it comes to state schools, yet is willing to relax this straitjacket when formulating free school and academy policy, is clearly politically, not educationally motivated.
In other words, if the government really wanted to raise standards, it would allow all schools - and not only the free schools and academies - to have a much greater say in choosing a curriculum that suited the schools' intake.
I have followed this stimulating debate with great interest. One of the issues that has received surprisingly little attention is the wider impact that the free school movement will have in future years. The call of 'raising educational standards' is repeated so often without clear definition that it seems many correspondents are parroting the speeches of Michael Gove. No-one in their right minds would deny that standards need to be raised - but it is the method of raising them through central educational policy that needs to be addressed as well as how an individual free school meets parental demand. The government's insistence on maintaining a curriculum straitjacket when it comes to state schools, yet is willing to relax this straitjacket when formulating free school and academy policy, is clearly politically, not educationally motivated. In other words, if the government really wanted to raise standards, it would allow all schools - and not only the free schools and academies - to have a much greater say in choosing a curriculum that suited the schools' intake. karolgadge
  • Score: 0

10:02pm Tue 17 Apr 12

Graham Hartley says...

StephenDes (Department of Education and Science?) and karolgadge should share the 'warrior of the week' award. sallythomson is on the lash and will draw good odds.
StephenDes (Department of Education and Science?) and karolgadge should share the 'warrior of the week' award. sallythomson is on the lash and will draw good odds. Graham Hartley
  • Score: 0

10:54am Wed 18 Apr 12

karolgadge says...

Thanks for this prospective award! (But I think that the Des in StephenDes may not refer to the now-abolished Department of Education and Science.)
In my contributions to the debate I've tried to highlight the possible consequences of the Coalition's headlong rush to establish free schools.
The critical questions are not centred around any one school in particular - whether Tauheedul or a Catholic, Maharishi or Anglican 'faith' free school.
I have had serious misgivings about right-wing Conservative educational policy for many years now. When Thatcherites in the 1980s began to talk of schools as 'businesses' and imply that education was a commodity to be sold like Cadbury's chocolate or Apple computers, I realised where the core of this ideology lay.

Perhaps Napoleon was quite correct in describing England as a 'nation of shopkeepers' ie marketing, profit, loss, competition, buying, selling and other associated terms were more highly regarded here than elsewhere.
Thanks for this prospective award! (But I think that the Des in StephenDes may not refer to the now-abolished Department of Education and Science.) In my contributions to the debate I've tried to highlight the possible consequences of the Coalition's headlong rush to establish free schools. The critical questions are not centred around any one school in particular - whether Tauheedul or a Catholic, Maharishi or Anglican 'faith' free school. I have had serious misgivings about right-wing Conservative educational policy for many years now. When Thatcherites in the 1980s began to talk of schools as 'businesses' and imply that education was a commodity to be sold like Cadbury's chocolate or Apple computers, I realised where the core of this ideology lay. Perhaps Napoleon was quite correct in describing England as a 'nation of shopkeepers' ie marketing, profit, loss, competition, buying, selling and other associated terms were more highly regarded here than elsewhere. karolgadge
  • Score: 0

4:44pm Sat 21 Apr 12

Iftikhar says...

Almost all children now believe they go to school to pass exams. The idea that they may be there for an education is irrelevant. State schools have become exam factories, interested only in A to C Grades. They do not educate children. Exam results do not reflect a candidate’s innate ability. Employers have moaned for years that too many employees cannot read or write properly. According to a survey, school-leavers and even graduates lack basic literacy and numeracy skills. More and more companies are having to provide remedial training to new staff, who can’t write clear instructions, do simple maths, or solve problems. Both graduates and school-leavers were also criticised for their sloppy time-keeping, ignorance of basic customer service and lack of self-discipline.

Bilingual Muslims children have a right, as much as any other faith group, to be taught their culture, languages and faith alongside a mainstream curriculum. More faith schools will be opened under sweeping reforms of the education system in England. There is a dire need for the growth of state funded Muslim schools to meet the growing needs and demands of the Muslim parents and children. Now the time has come that parents and community should take over the running of their local schools. Parent-run schools will give the diversity, the choice and the competition that the wealthy have in the private sector. Parents can perform a better job than the Local Authority because parents have a genuine vested interest. The Local Authority simply cannot be trusted.

The British Government is planning to make it easier to schools to “opt out” from the Local Authorities. Muslim children in state schools feel isolated and confused about who they are. This can cause dissatisfaction and lead them into criminality, and the lack of a true understanding of Islam can ultimately make them more susceptible to the teachings of fundamentalists like Christians during the middle ages and Jews in recent times in Palestine. Fundamentalism is nothing to do with Islam and Muslim; you are either a Muslim or a non-Muslim.

There are hundreds of state primary and secondary schools where Muslim pupils are in majority. In my opinion all such schools may be opted out to become Muslim Academies. This mean the Muslim children will get a decent education. Muslim schools turned out balanced citizens, more tolerant of others and less likely to succumb to criminality or extremism. Muslim schools give young people confidence in who they are and an understanding of Islam’s teaching of tolerance and respect which prepares them for a positive and fulfilling role in society. Muslim schools are attractive to Muslim parents because they have better discipline and teaching Islamic values. Children like discipline, structure and boundaries. Bilingual Muslim children need Bilingual Muslim teachers as role models during their developmental periods, who understand their needs and demands.

None of the British Muslims convicted following the riots in Bradford and Oldham in 2001 or any of those linked to the London bombings had been to Islamic schools. An American Think Tank studied the educational back ground of 300 Jihadists; none of them were educated in Pakistani Madrasas. They were all Western educated by non-Muslim teachers. Bilingual Muslim children need bilingual Muslim teachers as role models. A Cambridge University study found that single-sex classes could make a big difference for boys. They perform better in single-sex classes. The research is promising because male students in the study saw noticeable gains in the grades. The study confirms the Islamic notion that academic achievement is better in single-sex classes.
Iftikhar Ahmad
Almost all children now believe they go to school to pass exams. The idea that they may be there for an education is irrelevant. State schools have become exam factories, interested only in A to C Grades. They do not educate children. Exam results do not reflect a candidate’s innate ability. Employers have moaned for years that too many employees cannot read or write properly. According to a survey, school-leavers and even graduates lack basic literacy and numeracy skills. More and more companies are having to provide remedial training to new staff, who can’t write clear instructions, do simple maths, or solve problems. Both graduates and school-leavers were also criticised for their sloppy time-keeping, ignorance of basic customer service and lack of self-discipline. Bilingual Muslims children have a right, as much as any other faith group, to be taught their culture, languages and faith alongside a mainstream curriculum. More faith schools will be opened under sweeping reforms of the education system in England. There is a dire need for the growth of state funded Muslim schools to meet the growing needs and demands of the Muslim parents and children. Now the time has come that parents and community should take over the running of their local schools. Parent-run schools will give the diversity, the choice and the competition that the wealthy have in the private sector. Parents can perform a better job than the Local Authority because parents have a genuine vested interest. The Local Authority simply cannot be trusted. The British Government is planning to make it easier to schools to “opt out” from the Local Authorities. Muslim children in state schools feel isolated and confused about who they are. This can cause dissatisfaction and lead them into criminality, and the lack of a true understanding of Islam can ultimately make them more susceptible to the teachings of fundamentalists like Christians during the middle ages and Jews in recent times in Palestine. Fundamentalism is nothing to do with Islam and Muslim; you are either a Muslim or a non-Muslim. There are hundreds of state primary and secondary schools where Muslim pupils are in majority. In my opinion all such schools may be opted out to become Muslim Academies. This mean the Muslim children will get a decent education. Muslim schools turned out balanced citizens, more tolerant of others and less likely to succumb to criminality or extremism. Muslim schools give young people confidence in who they are and an understanding of Islam’s teaching of tolerance and respect which prepares them for a positive and fulfilling role in society. Muslim schools are attractive to Muslim parents because they have better discipline and teaching Islamic values. Children like discipline, structure and boundaries. Bilingual Muslim children need Bilingual Muslim teachers as role models during their developmental periods, who understand their needs and demands. None of the British Muslims convicted following the riots in Bradford and Oldham in 2001 or any of those linked to the London bombings had been to Islamic schools. An American Think Tank studied the educational back ground of 300 Jihadists; none of them were educated in Pakistani Madrasas. They were all Western educated by non-Muslim teachers. Bilingual Muslim children need bilingual Muslim teachers as role models. A Cambridge University study found that single-sex classes could make a big difference for boys. They perform better in single-sex classes. The research is promising because male students in the study saw noticeable gains in the grades. The study confirms the Islamic notion that academic achievement is better in single-sex classes. Iftikhar Ahmad Iftikhar
  • Score: 0

2:47pm Sun 22 Apr 12

karolgadge says...

Iftikhar wrote:
Almost all children now believe they go to school to pass exams. The idea that they may be there for an education is irrelevant. State schools have become exam factories, interested only in A to C Grades. They do not educate children. Exam results do not reflect a candidate’s innate ability. Employers have moaned for years that too many employees cannot read or write properly. According to a survey, school-leavers and even graduates lack basic literacy and numeracy skills. More and more companies are having to provide remedial training to new staff, who can’t write clear instructions, do simple maths, or solve problems. Both graduates and school-leavers were also criticised for their sloppy time-keeping, ignorance of basic customer service and lack of self-discipline.

Bilingual Muslims children have a right, as much as any other faith group, to be taught their culture, languages and faith alongside a mainstream curriculum. More faith schools will be opened under sweeping reforms of the education system in England. There is a dire need for the growth of state funded Muslim schools to meet the growing needs and demands of the Muslim parents and children. Now the time has come that parents and community should take over the running of their local schools. Parent-run schools will give the diversity, the choice and the competition that the wealthy have in the private sector. Parents can perform a better job than the Local Authority because parents have a genuine vested interest. The Local Authority simply cannot be trusted.

The British Government is planning to make it easier to schools to “opt out” from the Local Authorities. Muslim children in state schools feel isolated and confused about who they are. This can cause dissatisfaction and lead them into criminality, and the lack of a true understanding of Islam can ultimately make them more susceptible to the teachings of fundamentalists like Christians during the middle ages and Jews in recent times in Palestine. Fundamentalism is nothing to do with Islam and Muslim; you are either a Muslim or a non-Muslim.

There are hundreds of state primary and secondary schools where Muslim pupils are in majority. In my opinion all such schools may be opted out to become Muslim Academies. This mean the Muslim children will get a decent education. Muslim schools turned out balanced citizens, more tolerant of others and less likely to succumb to criminality or extremism. Muslim schools give young people confidence in who they are and an understanding of Islam’s teaching of tolerance and respect which prepares them for a positive and fulfilling role in society. Muslim schools are attractive to Muslim parents because they have better discipline and teaching Islamic values. Children like discipline, structure and boundaries. Bilingual Muslim children need Bilingual Muslim teachers as role models during their developmental periods, who understand their needs and demands.

None of the British Muslims convicted following the riots in Bradford and Oldham in 2001 or any of those linked to the London bombings had been to Islamic schools. An American Think Tank studied the educational back ground of 300 Jihadists; none of them were educated in Pakistani Madrasas. They were all Western educated by non-Muslim teachers. Bilingual Muslim children need bilingual Muslim teachers as role models. A Cambridge University study found that single-sex classes could make a big difference for boys. They perform better in single-sex classes. The research is promising because male students in the study saw noticeable gains in the grades. The study confirms the Islamic notion that academic achievement is better in single-sex classes.
Iftikhar Ahmad
You raise some very interesting, yet contentious points here.

Are you aware, for example, of the stipulation that in the case of faith free schools that are over-subscribed, 50 per cent of places must be allocated to those of other faiths or none? Your comment implies otherwise.

I would like to follow up your references to research findings also. Do you have the name/website of the American 'think tank' that investigated the educational background of the jihadists?
Lastly, I think that you go too far in implying that extremism/jihadism is largely caused by state or non-Muslim schools. Where is the evidence for this?
[quote][p][bold]Iftikhar[/bold] wrote: Almost all children now believe they go to school to pass exams. The idea that they may be there for an education is irrelevant. State schools have become exam factories, interested only in A to C Grades. They do not educate children. Exam results do not reflect a candidate’s innate ability. Employers have moaned for years that too many employees cannot read or write properly. According to a survey, school-leavers and even graduates lack basic literacy and numeracy skills. More and more companies are having to provide remedial training to new staff, who can’t write clear instructions, do simple maths, or solve problems. Both graduates and school-leavers were also criticised for their sloppy time-keeping, ignorance of basic customer service and lack of self-discipline. Bilingual Muslims children have a right, as much as any other faith group, to be taught their culture, languages and faith alongside a mainstream curriculum. More faith schools will be opened under sweeping reforms of the education system in England. There is a dire need for the growth of state funded Muslim schools to meet the growing needs and demands of the Muslim parents and children. Now the time has come that parents and community should take over the running of their local schools. Parent-run schools will give the diversity, the choice and the competition that the wealthy have in the private sector. Parents can perform a better job than the Local Authority because parents have a genuine vested interest. The Local Authority simply cannot be trusted. The British Government is planning to make it easier to schools to “opt out” from the Local Authorities. Muslim children in state schools feel isolated and confused about who they are. This can cause dissatisfaction and lead them into criminality, and the lack of a true understanding of Islam can ultimately make them more susceptible to the teachings of fundamentalists like Christians during the middle ages and Jews in recent times in Palestine. Fundamentalism is nothing to do with Islam and Muslim; you are either a Muslim or a non-Muslim. There are hundreds of state primary and secondary schools where Muslim pupils are in majority. In my opinion all such schools may be opted out to become Muslim Academies. This mean the Muslim children will get a decent education. Muslim schools turned out balanced citizens, more tolerant of others and less likely to succumb to criminality or extremism. Muslim schools give young people confidence in who they are and an understanding of Islam’s teaching of tolerance and respect which prepares them for a positive and fulfilling role in society. Muslim schools are attractive to Muslim parents because they have better discipline and teaching Islamic values. Children like discipline, structure and boundaries. Bilingual Muslim children need Bilingual Muslim teachers as role models during their developmental periods, who understand their needs and demands. None of the British Muslims convicted following the riots in Bradford and Oldham in 2001 or any of those linked to the London bombings had been to Islamic schools. An American Think Tank studied the educational back ground of 300 Jihadists; none of them were educated in Pakistani Madrasas. They were all Western educated by non-Muslim teachers. Bilingual Muslim children need bilingual Muslim teachers as role models. A Cambridge University study found that single-sex classes could make a big difference for boys. They perform better in single-sex classes. The research is promising because male students in the study saw noticeable gains in the grades. The study confirms the Islamic notion that academic achievement is better in single-sex classes. Iftikhar Ahmad[/p][/quote]You raise some very interesting, yet contentious points here. Are you aware, for example, of the stipulation that in the case of faith free schools that are over-subscribed, 50 per cent of places must be allocated to those of other faiths or none? Your comment implies otherwise. I would like to follow up your references to research findings also. Do you have the name/website of the American 'think tank' that investigated the educational background of the jihadists? Lastly, I think that you go too far in implying that extremism/jihadism is largely caused by state or non-Muslim schools. Where is the evidence for this? karolgadge
  • Score: 0

4:40pm Sun 22 Apr 12

Iftikhar says...

There is no place for a non-Muslim child or a teacher in a Muslim school. In fact native Brits or other non-Muslim parents would never send their children to Muslim schools or Free Muslim schools. There are only 168 Muslim schools and only 12 are state funded and all of them have lengthy waiting lists. When they are unable to admit all the Muslim children on their waiting list, there is no question of admitting non-muslim children.

None of 9/11 and 7/7 Jihadists were educated in Muslim schools. They were the product of the western education system. They have been mis-educated and de-educated by state schools with non-Muslim monolingual teachers.
IA
There is no place for a non-Muslim child or a teacher in a Muslim school. In fact native Brits or other non-Muslim parents would never send their children to Muslim schools or Free Muslim schools. There are only 168 Muslim schools and only 12 are state funded and all of them have lengthy waiting lists. When they are unable to admit all the Muslim children on their waiting list, there is no question of admitting non-muslim children. None of 9/11 and 7/7 Jihadists were educated in Muslim schools. They were the product of the western education system. They have been mis-educated and de-educated by state schools with non-Muslim monolingual teachers. IA Iftikhar
  • Score: 0

9:02am Mon 23 Apr 12

karolgadge says...

But have you read the details on the Department for Education's website regarding admissions to faith 'free schools?'
You appear to be unaware that there are guidelines that you advocate breaking. Basically, in your response you clearly are in favour of complete segregation between Muslim and non-Muslim.
Moreover, I asked you for details of the American think-tank research - you haven't done so.
As you have refused a reasonable request, this correspondence - from me - is now closed. I wish you well.
But have you read the details on the Department for Education's website regarding admissions to faith 'free schools?' You appear to be unaware that there are guidelines that you advocate breaking. Basically, in your response you clearly are in favour of complete segregation between Muslim and non-Muslim. Moreover, I asked you for details of the American think-tank research - you haven't done so. As you have refused a reasonable request, this correspondence - from me - is now closed. I wish you well. karolgadge
  • Score: 0

11:40am Mon 23 Apr 12

Iftikhar says...

I do not keep any record. It is just possible that you can find this piece of research on internet.
I do not keep any record. It is just possible that you can find this piece of research on internet. Iftikhar
  • Score: 0

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