East Lancs politicians call for last orders on pub conversions

Closed... General Havelock Inn, on Accrington Road, Burnley

Closed... General Havelock Inn, on Accrington Road, Burnley

First published in News Lancashire Telegraph: Photograph of the Author by , Local government reporter

EAST Lancashire politicians have backed calls for changes in the law to make it harder for pubs to be turned into shops.

The Campaign for Real Ale said it was ‘perverse’ that inns could be demolished or converted into shops and other business uses without planning permission. It wants the government to tighten legislation so developers have to apply for perm-ission to convert pubs.

Tory MPs Andrew Stephenson and Nigel Evans have backed the consumer group, as has Blackburn with Darwen Labour councillor Phil Riley.

CAMRA says 31 UK pubs have closed every week this year, compared with 26 a week in March 2013, with two a week becoming super-markets or stores since 2012. Pendle MP Mr Stephenson backed Cam-ra’s campaign.

He said: “The Greyhound at Bar-noldswick was saved from housing when people had time to rally round.”

Coun Riley, involved in the unsuccessful bid to save the Stanley Arms, said: “Making sure such changes go through the planning process gives time to save a pub from being sold. We have seen too many pubs turned into businesses like The Plane Tree in Little Harwood into a shop.”

Ribble Valley MP Mr Evans: “We need to shut this loophole to stop pubs being closed. We need these community centres. There are several at risk in my constituency, including the Black Bull, Rimington, The White Bull, Gisburn and Coach and Horses, Bolton-by-Bowland.”

Comments (3)

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2:33pm Wed 13 Aug 14

Doug Spencer says...

Not wishing to point out the obvious but, pubs close through lack of patrons. If the pub is left closed it becomes an eye-sore and attracts anti-social behavour. Far better for them to be used as shops, offices or housing than stand empty.
Not wishing to point out the obvious but, pubs close through lack of patrons. If the pub is left closed it becomes an eye-sore and attracts anti-social behavour. Far better for them to be used as shops, offices or housing than stand empty. Doug Spencer
  • Score: 4

4:27pm Wed 13 Aug 14

Pan-cake says...

Doug Spencer wrote:
Not wishing to point out the obvious but, pubs close through lack of patrons. If the pub is left closed it becomes an eye-sore and attracts anti-social behavour. Far better for them to be used as shops, offices or housing than stand empty.
Sadly, true.
A decline set in motion by Lord Youngs Beer Orders many years ago. Followed by big screen home tv's Sky Sport and wheeling and dealing by the likes of Punch and Enterprise.
[quote][p][bold]Doug Spencer[/bold] wrote: Not wishing to point out the obvious but, pubs close through lack of patrons. If the pub is left closed it becomes an eye-sore and attracts anti-social behavour. Far better for them to be used as shops, offices or housing than stand empty.[/p][/quote]Sadly, true. A decline set in motion by Lord Youngs Beer Orders many years ago. Followed by big screen home tv's Sky Sport and wheeling and dealing by the likes of Punch and Enterprise. Pan-cake
  • Score: 3

9:54am Thu 14 Aug 14

Copperhead says...

You can't keep a business running if people don't want to use it.
The " pub " as we know it in the UK - as opposed to an " inn " - was a phenomenon of the industrial age where manual workers could get cheap
( and weak by today's standards ) beer and ale to drink after a hot and hard day in the mill, foundry, ironworks etc etc. Tap water was safe to drink until late in the 19th century, and even then not all homes had running water. My maternal grandfather, who was born in 1890 used to tell me that he was given a glass of mild beer with meals when he was a boy.
With the passing of the smoke-stack industries and heavy manual work, the writing was on the wall for the pub - it's demise being hastened by draconian drink-driving laws, then the smoking ban and finally immigration into former working-class areas by people who don't drink for religious reasons.
The financial armageddon of 2008 was the last straw for many pubs - people now have less cash to spare than previously and the supermarkets have taken much of the drinks trade from the pub.
Why spend £4 on a pint , risk losing your licence, not be able to have a fag and have to spend time and money getting to the pub in the first place, when £4 will buy you 4 cans of quality imported lager ( no InBev rubbish)
at places like B&M , which you can then drink in the comfort of your own home and smoke at the same time ???
People went to pubs because that's were the ale was - now it's at ALDI and LIDL for a much lower cost, it's goodbye pub.
You can't keep a business running if people don't want to use it. The " pub " as we know it in the UK - as opposed to an " inn " - was a phenomenon of the industrial age where manual workers could get cheap ( and weak by today's standards ) beer and ale to drink after a hot and hard day in the mill, foundry, ironworks etc etc. Tap water was safe to drink until late in the 19th century, and even then not all homes had running water. My maternal grandfather, who was born in 1890 used to tell me that he was given a glass of mild beer with meals when he was a boy. With the passing of the smoke-stack industries and heavy manual work, the writing was on the wall for the pub - it's demise being hastened by draconian drink-driving laws, then the smoking ban and finally immigration into former working-class areas by people who don't drink for religious reasons. The financial armageddon of 2008 was the last straw for many pubs - people now have less cash to spare than previously and the supermarkets have taken much of the drinks trade from the pub. Why spend £4 on a pint , risk losing your licence, not be able to have a fag and have to spend time and money getting to the pub in the first place, when £4 will buy you 4 cans of quality imported lager ( no InBev rubbish) at places like B&M , which you can then drink in the comfort of your own home and smoke at the same time ??? People went to pubs because that's were the ale was - now it's at ALDI and LIDL for a much lower cost, it's goodbye pub. Copperhead
  • Score: 1

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