Lancashire TelegraphBlackburn widower forgives death driver (From Lancashire Telegraph)

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Blackburn widower forgives death driver

Lancashire Telegraph: Jim Parkinson Jim Parkinson

THE widower of a great-grandmother knocked down on a Blackburn road has said he forgives her killer.

Yesterday, Hussain Ali, 30, pleaded guilty to ploughing into 79-year-old Maria Parkinson as she walked home from picking up a prescription.

He has been warned by a judge he could now be sent to prison after admitting causing death by careless driving.

Speaking after the hearing, Mrs Parkinson’s husband of 56 years said he believed his wife would have wanted her family to be able to move on.

Jim Parkinson, 83, said: “We miss her so much, but hopefully the whole thing will all be put to rest now.

“Him pleading guilty is justice for Maria. She was not the kind of person to hold a grudge.”

Keen line-dancer Mrs Parkinson, who was also known as Marie, was killed as she crossed Spring Lane, Blackburn, in July 2012.

Ali, of St Silas’s Road, admitted at Mrs Parkinson’s inquest that he could have been driving his Volkswagen Golf over the speed limit in the 30mph zone when he crashed into the retired weaver causing her fatal head injuries.

Other witnesses told the court the driver was doing ‘at least 40mph’.

The mother-of-three was taken to the Royal Blackburn Hospital, but she died from her injuries.

Mr Parkinson said: “We all remember that day.

“I had gone to pick my great-grandson up at school with my granddaughter and we saw Marie walking up from the chemist.

“She had gone to pick up a prescription.

“We carried on round the corner and she was walking up towards the lights at Witton. I assumed she was going to come up through the park.

“We picked my great-grandson up and we came home. I thought it was funny the door was locked because I thought she would have been home by then.

“A bit later on, the police came round and told us what happened. I was shocked.”

Coroner Michael Singleton had recorded a verdict of accidental death in April last year and no charges were immediately brought.

But in December, Ali said he would voluntarily return from India after being told he faced prosecution relating to Mrs Parkinson’s death.

After the prospect of facing a four-day trial, Mr Parkinson said he was relieved his family had been spared the ordeal by Ali’s guilty plea.

The retired asphalter said: “I have not been able to settle and so I am pleased there will not be a trial.

“The night before the hearing I did not sleep at all.

“Marie would have been pleased too that he pleaded guilty so we do not have to go through a trial.

“All I wanted was justice for Marie. That is all I ever wanted.

“I have forgiven him now, but my granddaughters and daughters have not.”

Mr Parkinson said he had fond memories of his wife that he would cherish.

He added: “She was a very kind person and everybody liked her. She was very popular.

“Marie used to like walking and shopping.

“We were married for 56 years. I enjoyed sports and she liked dancing, but it never clashed.

“I used to take her and her friend to dance in Mill Hill and at Bennington Street and pick them up after.

“We all miss her, but I do more than anybody.”

Ali will be sentenced on August 1. The hearing was adjourned to allow for the preparation of a pre-sentence report.

Defending, Mark Stuart said: “It was a serious and tragic case.

“He has been driving for two years without a problem. There is not a blemish on his record.”

Judge Michael Byrne told the defendant he was facing a ‘substantial period’ of disqualification from driving after the sentence is passed.

He said: “You have pleaded guilty to causing death by careless driving.

“The fact I have ordered a pre-sentence report in no way indicates the nature of the sentence. All options will be open to the court when you are sentenced.”

Comments (20)

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7:36am Tue 8 Jul 14

The Seagull has landed says...

Very noble of Mr Parkinson. What a thorough decent gentleman.

I hope Mr Ali receives both the maximum custodial sentence available and the maximum driving disqualification period available.
Very noble of Mr Parkinson. What a thorough decent gentleman. I hope Mr Ali receives both the maximum custodial sentence available and the maximum driving disqualification period available. The Seagull has landed
  • Score: 57

9:52am Tue 8 Jul 14

ikap22 says...

The Seagull has landed wrote:
Very noble of Mr Parkinson. What a thorough decent gentleman.

I hope Mr Ali receives both the maximum custodial sentence available and the maximum driving disqualification period available.
We all know that's not going to happen! They shouldn't have allowed him back in the UK. Why waste tax payer's money on court hearing and holiday of a prison break at the pleasure of hard working people. No doubt he will be cliaming all sorts of benefits when released.
[quote][p][bold]The Seagull has landed[/bold] wrote: Very noble of Mr Parkinson. What a thorough decent gentleman. I hope Mr Ali receives both the maximum custodial sentence available and the maximum driving disqualification period available.[/p][/quote]We all know that's not going to happen! They shouldn't have allowed him back in the UK. Why waste tax payer's money on court hearing and holiday of a prison break at the pleasure of hard working people. No doubt he will be cliaming all sorts of benefits when released. ikap22
  • Score: 26

2:26pm Tue 8 Jul 14

woolywords says...

Jim,
“You're a real prince. You're a gentleman and a scholar...”, as Salinger says.
Very few of us could do what you have done.
To err is human; to forgive, divine, in another quote.
...
Am truly lost for words here; am so humbled by your act of forgiveness.
I doubt that I could ever do that.
But know this, you've really made me think about my values.
...
I think that Hussain Ali deserves a little respect, for doing the honourable thing, when so many would shirk that responsibility and hide. Credit, where credit is due, to that man.
Jim, “You're a real prince. You're a gentleman and a scholar...”, as Salinger says. Very few of us could do what you have done. To err is human; to forgive, divine, in another quote. ... Am truly lost for words here; am so humbled by your act of forgiveness. I doubt that I could ever do that. But know this, you've really made me think about my values. ... I think that Hussain Ali deserves a little respect, for doing the honourable thing, when so many would shirk that responsibility and hide. Credit, where credit is due, to that man. woolywords
  • Score: 3

2:58pm Tue 8 Jul 14

ikap22 says...

woolywords wrote:
Jim,
“You're a real prince. You're a gentleman and a scholar...”, as Salinger says.
Very few of us could do what you have done.
To err is human; to forgive, divine, in another quote.
...
Am truly lost for words here; am so humbled by your act of forgiveness.
I doubt that I could ever do that.
But know this, you've really made me think about my values.
...
I think that Hussain Ali deserves a little respect, for doing the honourable thing, when so many would shirk that responsibility and hide. Credit, where credit is due, to that man.
The driver must be your relation!
[quote][p][bold]woolywords[/bold] wrote: Jim, “You're a real prince. You're a gentleman and a scholar...”, as Salinger says. Very few of us could do what you have done. To err is human; to forgive, divine, in another quote. ... Am truly lost for words here; am so humbled by your act of forgiveness. I doubt that I could ever do that. But know this, you've really made me think about my values. ... I think that Hussain Ali deserves a little respect, for doing the honourable thing, when so many would shirk that responsibility and hide. Credit, where credit is due, to that man.[/p][/quote]The driver must be your relation! ikap22
  • Score: 7

4:59pm Tue 8 Jul 14

The Seagull has landed says...

woolywords wrote:
Jim,
“You're a real prince. You're a gentleman and a scholar...”, as Salinger says.
Very few of us could do what you have done.
To err is human; to forgive, divine, in another quote.
...
Am truly lost for words here; am so humbled by your act of forgiveness.
I doubt that I could ever do that.
But know this, you've really made me think about my values.
...
I think that Hussain Ali deserves a little respect, for doing the honourable thing, when so many would shirk that responsibility and hide. Credit, where credit is due, to that man.
Sorry, he deserves nothing.
[quote][p][bold]woolywords[/bold] wrote: Jim, “You're a real prince. You're a gentleman and a scholar...”, as Salinger says. Very few of us could do what you have done. To err is human; to forgive, divine, in another quote. ... Am truly lost for words here; am so humbled by your act of forgiveness. I doubt that I could ever do that. But know this, you've really made me think about my values. ... I think that Hussain Ali deserves a little respect, for doing the honourable thing, when so many would shirk that responsibility and hide. Credit, where credit is due, to that man.[/p][/quote]Sorry, he deserves nothing. The Seagull has landed
  • Score: 12

5:08pm Tue 8 Jul 14

Personperson says...

ikap22 wrote:
The Seagull has landed wrote:
Very noble of Mr Parkinson. What a thorough decent gentleman.

I hope Mr Ali receives both the maximum custodial sentence available and the maximum driving disqualification period available.
We all know that's not going to happen! They shouldn't have allowed him back in the UK. Why waste tax payer's money on court hearing and holiday of a prison break at the pleasure of hard working people. No doubt he will be cliaming all sorts of benefits when released.
Some people are so presumptuous!

Mr Ali was born in England and has lived here his entire life. He has never claimed benefits and part owns a very successful business. He was visiting India to partake in a family member's wedding. He has also been devastated by what has happened and feels deep remorse for the whole ordeal.

I know all this as I know him through business association and have come to know him quite well over the years. He is a fairly quiet, hardworking, unassuming person that has sadly made a terrible mistake, and is reeling from the effects of this tragedy as much as every one else involved.

Hold your tongue next time you spout completely unfounded comments towards a situation you know little about, based on nothing more than him having a non traditionally English name and family in India, it is borderline racism. There are two sides to every coin.
[quote][p][bold]ikap22[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]The Seagull has landed[/bold] wrote: Very noble of Mr Parkinson. What a thorough decent gentleman. I hope Mr Ali receives both the maximum custodial sentence available and the maximum driving disqualification period available.[/p][/quote]We all know that's not going to happen! They shouldn't have allowed him back in the UK. Why waste tax payer's money on court hearing and holiday of a prison break at the pleasure of hard working people. No doubt he will be cliaming all sorts of benefits when released.[/p][/quote]Some people are so presumptuous! Mr Ali was born in England and has lived here his entire life. He has never claimed benefits and part owns a very successful business. He was visiting India to partake in a family member's wedding. He has also been devastated by what has happened and feels deep remorse for the whole ordeal. I know all this as I know him through business association and have come to know him quite well over the years. He is a fairly quiet, hardworking, unassuming person that has sadly made a terrible mistake, and is reeling from the effects of this tragedy as much as every one else involved. Hold your tongue next time you spout completely unfounded comments towards a situation you know little about, based on nothing more than him having a non traditionally English name and family in India, it is borderline racism. There are two sides to every coin. Personperson
  • Score: 8

5:41pm Tue 8 Jul 14

Cmd1456 says...

All credit where credits due! There is no credit given to anybody who takes someone elses life.This man deserves to go to jail, also should have a driving ban for life.Her family have to live without her now, a tragedy that could have been prevented.
All credit where credits due! There is no credit given to anybody who takes someone elses life.This man deserves to go to jail, also should have a driving ban for life.Her family have to live without her now, a tragedy that could have been prevented. Cmd1456
  • Score: 12

6:14pm Tue 8 Jul 14

woolywords says...

as you write in wrath, consider this..
he could have hidden in India,
not done the honourable thing, as he did,
stood before a court, admitted guilt,
deserving some credit for that?
....
In all of this rage, we have to draw a line..
the line is..
between justice and punishment
You have to call, when punishment ends, and retribution begins.
as you write in wrath, consider this.. he could have hidden in India, not done the honourable thing, as he did, stood before a court, admitted guilt, deserving some credit for that? .... In all of this rage, we have to draw a line.. the line is.. between justice and punishment You have to call, when punishment ends, and retribution begins. woolywords
  • Score: 1

6:31pm Tue 8 Jul 14

woolywords says...

am not muslim, nor related to him.
I just have a sense of fair play, that some lack.
...
He could have buggered off, entirely,
yet, stood his ground, admitted his wrong,
where you don't give a credit for that?
...
Thankfully, I've got better values than you.
Good man, I say..
...
Am the most racist pig on these comments,
but I know a good man, when I see one.
am not muslim, nor related to him. I just have a sense of fair play, that some lack. ... He could have buggered off, entirely, yet, stood his ground, admitted his wrong, where you don't give a credit for that? ... Thankfully, I've got better values than you. Good man, I say.. ... Am the most racist pig on these comments, but I know a good man, when I see one. woolywords
  • Score: 0

6:36pm Tue 8 Jul 14

Cmd1456 says...

Two years it took to admit guilt.Do I need to say anymore and it was a last minute confession. He put himself through torture but her family through hell!
Two years it took to admit guilt.Do I need to say anymore and it was a last minute confession. He put himself through torture but her family through hell! Cmd1456
  • Score: 7

10:22pm Tue 8 Jul 14

The Seagull has landed says...

Personperson wrote:
ikap22 wrote:
The Seagull has landed wrote:
Very noble of Mr Parkinson. What a thorough decent gentleman.

I hope Mr Ali receives both the maximum custodial sentence available and the maximum driving disqualification period available.
We all know that's not going to happen! They shouldn't have allowed him back in the UK. Why waste tax payer's money on court hearing and holiday of a prison break at the pleasure of hard working people. No doubt he will be cliaming all sorts of benefits when released.
Some people are so presumptuous!

Mr Ali was born in England and has lived here his entire life. He has never claimed benefits and part owns a very successful business. He was visiting India to partake in a family member's wedding. He has also been devastated by what has happened and feels deep remorse for the whole ordeal.

I know all this as I know him through business association and have come to know him quite well over the years. He is a fairly quiet, hardworking, unassuming person that has sadly made a terrible mistake, and is reeling from the effects of this tragedy as much as every one else involved.

Hold your tongue next time you spout completely unfounded comments towards a situation you know little about, based on nothing more than him having a non traditionally English name and family in India, it is borderline racism. There are two sides to every coin.
I couldn't give a toss where he comes from. Terrible mistake or not he deserves to rot in a prison cell.
You have a responsibility when you get behind the wheel of what is basically a lethal weapon, to ensure that you drive it in a way that doesn't compromise the safety of anybody. If you don't, as in the case of Mr Ali then you should be punished harshly.
[quote][p][bold]Personperson[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]ikap22[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]The Seagull has landed[/bold] wrote: Very noble of Mr Parkinson. What a thorough decent gentleman. I hope Mr Ali receives both the maximum custodial sentence available and the maximum driving disqualification period available.[/p][/quote]We all know that's not going to happen! They shouldn't have allowed him back in the UK. Why waste tax payer's money on court hearing and holiday of a prison break at the pleasure of hard working people. No doubt he will be cliaming all sorts of benefits when released.[/p][/quote]Some people are so presumptuous! Mr Ali was born in England and has lived here his entire life. He has never claimed benefits and part owns a very successful business. He was visiting India to partake in a family member's wedding. He has also been devastated by what has happened and feels deep remorse for the whole ordeal. I know all this as I know him through business association and have come to know him quite well over the years. He is a fairly quiet, hardworking, unassuming person that has sadly made a terrible mistake, and is reeling from the effects of this tragedy as much as every one else involved. Hold your tongue next time you spout completely unfounded comments towards a situation you know little about, based on nothing more than him having a non traditionally English name and family in India, it is borderline racism. There are two sides to every coin.[/p][/quote]I couldn't give a toss where he comes from. Terrible mistake or not he deserves to rot in a prison cell. You have a responsibility when you get behind the wheel of what is basically a lethal weapon, to ensure that you drive it in a way that doesn't compromise the safety of anybody. If you don't, as in the case of Mr Ali then you should be punished harshly. The Seagull has landed
  • Score: 5

11:06pm Tue 8 Jul 14

ikap22 says...

Personperson wrote:
ikap22 wrote:
The Seagull has landed wrote:
Very noble of Mr Parkinson. What a thorough decent gentleman.

I hope Mr Ali receives both the maximum custodial sentence available and the maximum driving disqualification period available.
We all know that's not going to happen! They shouldn't have allowed him back in the UK. Why waste tax payer's money on court hearing and holiday of a prison break at the pleasure of hard working people. No doubt he will be cliaming all sorts of benefits when released.
Some people are so presumptuous!

Mr Ali was born in England and has lived here his entire life. He has never claimed benefits and part owns a very successful business. He was visiting India to partake in a family member's wedding. He has also been devastated by what has happened and feels deep remorse for the whole ordeal.

I know all this as I know him through business association and have come to know him quite well over the years. He is a fairly quiet, hardworking, unassuming person that has sadly made a terrible mistake, and is reeling from the effects of this tragedy as much as every one else involved.

Hold your tongue next time you spout completely unfounded comments towards a situation you know little about, based on nothing more than him having a non traditionally English name and family in India, it is borderline racism. There are two sides to every coin.
And your point being? Anyhow, you seem to know alot about this Ali geezer, think your more than his business associate. Had this happened in India! Your lot would have slaughtered him. Lucky for Mr Ali his living in a democratic society. Finally, makes no difference where and how he was born, his still a immigrant. Second class citizen with first class privileges.
[quote][p][bold]Personperson[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]ikap22[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]The Seagull has landed[/bold] wrote: Very noble of Mr Parkinson. What a thorough decent gentleman. I hope Mr Ali receives both the maximum custodial sentence available and the maximum driving disqualification period available.[/p][/quote]We all know that's not going to happen! They shouldn't have allowed him back in the UK. Why waste tax payer's money on court hearing and holiday of a prison break at the pleasure of hard working people. No doubt he will be cliaming all sorts of benefits when released.[/p][/quote]Some people are so presumptuous! Mr Ali was born in England and has lived here his entire life. He has never claimed benefits and part owns a very successful business. He was visiting India to partake in a family member's wedding. He has also been devastated by what has happened and feels deep remorse for the whole ordeal. I know all this as I know him through business association and have come to know him quite well over the years. He is a fairly quiet, hardworking, unassuming person that has sadly made a terrible mistake, and is reeling from the effects of this tragedy as much as every one else involved. Hold your tongue next time you spout completely unfounded comments towards a situation you know little about, based on nothing more than him having a non traditionally English name and family in India, it is borderline racism. There are two sides to every coin.[/p][/quote]And your point being? Anyhow, you seem to know alot about this Ali geezer, think your more than his business associate. Had this happened in India! Your lot would have slaughtered him. Lucky for Mr Ali his living in a democratic society. Finally, makes no difference where and how he was born, his still a immigrant. Second class citizen with first class privileges. ikap22
  • Score: -6

11:47pm Tue 8 Jul 14

Darwen Malc says...

Ikap22 - Quote 'Finally, makes no difference where and how he was born, his still a immigrant'.
Colour or heritage doesn't make you an immigrant! How can you be an immigrant if you were born here? Please explain, I would love to read your cohesive and reasoned argument.
Ikap22 - Quote 'Finally, makes no difference where and how he was born, his still a immigrant'. Colour or heritage doesn't make you an immigrant! How can you be an immigrant if you were born here? Please explain, I would love to read your cohesive and reasoned argument. Darwen Malc
  • Score: 9

1:19am Wed 9 Jul 14

ikap22 says...

Darwen Malc wrote:
Ikap22 - Quote 'Finally, makes no difference where and how he was born, his still a immigrant'.
Colour or heritage doesn't make you an immigrant! How can you be an immigrant if you were born here? Please explain, I would love to read your cohesive and reasoned argument.
To me his a immigrant. Hope that answers your question.
[quote][p][bold]Darwen Malc[/bold] wrote: Ikap22 - Quote 'Finally, makes no difference where and how he was born, his still a immigrant'. Colour or heritage doesn't make you an immigrant! How can you be an immigrant if you were born here? Please explain, I would love to read your cohesive and reasoned argument.[/p][/quote]To me his a immigrant. Hope that answers your question. ikap22
  • Score: -10

1:37am Wed 9 Jul 14

Darwen Malc says...

ikap22 wrote:
Darwen Malc wrote:
Ikap22 - Quote 'Finally, makes no difference where and how he was born, his still a immigrant'.
Colour or heritage doesn't make you an immigrant! How can you be an immigrant if you were born here? Please explain, I would love to read your cohesive and reasoned argument.
To me his a immigrant. Hope that answers your question.
Either 'he is' or 'he's', not 'his' and it is 'an' before immigrant, not 'a'. Obviously thick because (1) you have no basic command of grammar and (2) you have no reasoned argument for your statement - RETARD!
[quote][p][bold]ikap22[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Darwen Malc[/bold] wrote: Ikap22 - Quote 'Finally, makes no difference where and how he was born, his still a immigrant'. Colour or heritage doesn't make you an immigrant! How can you be an immigrant if you were born here? Please explain, I would love to read your cohesive and reasoned argument.[/p][/quote]To me his a immigrant. Hope that answers your question.[/p][/quote]Either 'he is' or 'he's', not 'his' and it is 'an' before immigrant, not 'a'. Obviously thick because (1) you have no basic command of grammar and (2) you have no reasoned argument for your statement - RETARD! Darwen Malc
  • Score: 11

9:51am Wed 9 Jul 14

ladysal says...

ikap22 wrote:
Personperson wrote:
ikap22 wrote:
The Seagull has landed wrote:
Very noble of Mr Parkinson. What a thorough decent gentleman.

I hope Mr Ali receives both the maximum custodial sentence available and the maximum driving disqualification period available.
We all know that's not going to happen! They shouldn't have allowed him back in the UK. Why waste tax payer's money on court hearing and holiday of a prison break at the pleasure of hard working people. No doubt he will be cliaming all sorts of benefits when released.
Some people are so presumptuous!

Mr Ali was born in England and has lived here his entire life. He has never claimed benefits and part owns a very successful business. He was visiting India to partake in a family member's wedding. He has also been devastated by what has happened and feels deep remorse for the whole ordeal.

I know all this as I know him through business association and have come to know him quite well over the years. He is a fairly quiet, hardworking, unassuming person that has sadly made a terrible mistake, and is reeling from the effects of this tragedy as much as every one else involved.

Hold your tongue next time you spout completely unfounded comments towards a situation you know little about, based on nothing more than him having a non traditionally English name and family in India, it is borderline racism. There are two sides to every coin.
And your point being? Anyhow, you seem to know alot about this Ali geezer, think your more than his business associate. Had this happened in India! Your lot would have slaughtered him. Lucky for Mr Ali his living in a democratic society. Finally, makes no difference where and how he was born, his still a immigrant. Second class citizen with first class privileges.
And you ikap22 are the sort of person who makes me ashamed to be white and british.
It doesn't happen often, but I agree with Woolywords on this one. He could have stayed in India. He could have pleaded not guilty. Both of those would have prolonged the agony for the family of the deceased, who are the only people who really matter in this. He did neither, allowing them a swift resolution to the legalities and an opportunity to grieve for their wife / mother / grandmother in paece. Compare that to the agony Rolf Harris's victims went through.
Give a little respect to a human being who has done the right thing and has to live with the consequences of his actions forever, regardless of what punishment the court gives him.
[quote][p][bold]ikap22[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Personperson[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]ikap22[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]The Seagull has landed[/bold] wrote: Very noble of Mr Parkinson. What a thorough decent gentleman. I hope Mr Ali receives both the maximum custodial sentence available and the maximum driving disqualification period available.[/p][/quote]We all know that's not going to happen! They shouldn't have allowed him back in the UK. Why waste tax payer's money on court hearing and holiday of a prison break at the pleasure of hard working people. No doubt he will be cliaming all sorts of benefits when released.[/p][/quote]Some people are so presumptuous! Mr Ali was born in England and has lived here his entire life. He has never claimed benefits and part owns a very successful business. He was visiting India to partake in a family member's wedding. He has also been devastated by what has happened and feels deep remorse for the whole ordeal. I know all this as I know him through business association and have come to know him quite well over the years. He is a fairly quiet, hardworking, unassuming person that has sadly made a terrible mistake, and is reeling from the effects of this tragedy as much as every one else involved. Hold your tongue next time you spout completely unfounded comments towards a situation you know little about, based on nothing more than him having a non traditionally English name and family in India, it is borderline racism. There are two sides to every coin.[/p][/quote]And your point being? Anyhow, you seem to know alot about this Ali geezer, think your more than his business associate. Had this happened in India! Your lot would have slaughtered him. Lucky for Mr Ali his living in a democratic society. Finally, makes no difference where and how he was born, his still a immigrant. Second class citizen with first class privileges.[/p][/quote]And you ikap22 are the sort of person who makes me ashamed to be white and british. It doesn't happen often, but I agree with Woolywords on this one. He could have stayed in India. He could have pleaded not guilty. Both of those would have prolonged the agony for the family of the deceased, who are the only people who really matter in this. He did neither, allowing them a swift resolution to the legalities and an opportunity to grieve for their wife / mother / grandmother in paece. Compare that to the agony Rolf Harris's victims went through. Give a little respect to a human being who has done the right thing and has to live with the consequences of his actions forever, regardless of what punishment the court gives him. ladysal
  • Score: 5

1:54pm Wed 9 Jul 14

CorkyMac says...

woolywords wrote:
Jim,
“You're a real prince. You're a gentleman and a scholar...”, as Salinger says.
Very few of us could do what you have done.
To err is human; to forgive, divine, in another quote.
...
Am truly lost for words here; am so humbled by your act of forgiveness.
I doubt that I could ever do that.
But know this, you've really made me think about my values.
...
I think that Hussain Ali deserves a little respect, for doing the honourable thing, when so many would shirk that responsibility and hide. Credit, where credit is due, to that man.
Here here Woolywords.
This man has done wrong and people are quite angry (rightly so) and emotions run high. But same as you say, give this man a little credit for coming back and pleading guilty, It will hopefully put things to rest for all concerned eventually. No more bitterness of how a lowlife got away with It and not being bought to justice because he fled the system. Unfortunately, I myself have gone over the 30 mph speed limit and there goes me but for the grace of God. Had I have knocked some one down, I would have to live with that for the rest of my life how I took someone's Mother/Wife, and would expect the book thrown at me. My heart goes out to the family, It really does suffering such a massive loss, but by this man coming back to be dealt with, It will give them closure of some sort.
Now, thank God, I'm at an age were responsible driving Is paramount, but rather than just speed camera's, this Government should maybe change the driving laws for young drivers. Up to the age of 21, a car no more than a 1.1 engine, up to 25 no more than a 1.3. If you commit a fatal accident over the age of 25, then expect the book thrown at you, because you should know better by then, and that Is why Mr Ali should receive the maximum punishment.
My last word goes to Jim, well done Sir, your forgiveness Is a shining example to mankind In general after what must have been/still Is a most traumatic time for you. My heart and prayers go out to you Sir.
[quote][p][bold]woolywords[/bold] wrote: Jim, “You're a real prince. You're a gentleman and a scholar...”, as Salinger says. Very few of us could do what you have done. To err is human; to forgive, divine, in another quote. ... Am truly lost for words here; am so humbled by your act of forgiveness. I doubt that I could ever do that. But know this, you've really made me think about my values. ... I think that Hussain Ali deserves a little respect, for doing the honourable thing, when so many would shirk that responsibility and hide. Credit, where credit is due, to that man.[/p][/quote]Here here Woolywords. This man has done wrong and people are quite angry (rightly so) and emotions run high. But same as you say, give this man a little credit for coming back and pleading guilty, It will hopefully put things to rest for all concerned eventually. No more bitterness of how a lowlife got away with It and not being bought to justice because he fled the system. Unfortunately, I myself have gone over the 30 mph speed limit and there goes me but for the grace of God. Had I have knocked some one down, I would have to live with that for the rest of my life how I took someone's Mother/Wife, and would expect the book thrown at me. My heart goes out to the family, It really does suffering such a massive loss, but by this man coming back to be dealt with, It will give them closure of some sort. Now, thank God, I'm at an age were responsible driving Is paramount, but rather than just speed camera's, this Government should maybe change the driving laws for young drivers. Up to the age of 21, a car no more than a 1.1 engine, up to 25 no more than a 1.3. If you commit a fatal accident over the age of 25, then expect the book thrown at you, because you should know better by then, and that Is why Mr Ali should receive the maximum punishment. My last word goes to Jim, well done Sir, your forgiveness Is a shining example to mankind In general after what must have been/still Is a most traumatic time for you. My heart and prayers go out to you Sir. CorkyMac
  • Score: 1

7:18am Fri 11 Jul 14

Lancashire123 says...

ikap22 wrote:
woolywords wrote:
Jim,
“You're a real prince. You're a gentleman and a scholar...”, as Salinger says.
Very few of us could do what you have done.
To err is human; to forgive, divine, in another quote.
...
Am truly lost for words here; am so humbled by your act of forgiveness.
I doubt that I could ever do that.
But know this, you've really made me think about my values.
...
I think that Hussain Ali deserves a little respect, for doing the honourable thing, when so many would shirk that responsibility and hide. Credit, where credit is due, to that man.
The driver must be your relation!
And your enemy?
[quote][p][bold]ikap22[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]woolywords[/bold] wrote: Jim, “You're a real prince. You're a gentleman and a scholar...”, as Salinger says. Very few of us could do what you have done. To err is human; to forgive, divine, in another quote. ... Am truly lost for words here; am so humbled by your act of forgiveness. I doubt that I could ever do that. But know this, you've really made me think about my values. ... I think that Hussain Ali deserves a little respect, for doing the honourable thing, when so many would shirk that responsibility and hide. Credit, where credit is due, to that man.[/p][/quote]The driver must be your relation![/p][/quote]And your enemy? Lancashire123
  • Score: 1

7:25am Fri 11 Jul 14

Lancashire123 says...

ikap22 wrote:
Personperson wrote:
ikap22 wrote:
The Seagull has landed wrote:
Very noble of Mr Parkinson. What a thorough decent gentleman.

I hope Mr Ali receives both the maximum custodial sentence available and the maximum driving disqualification period available.
We all know that's not going to happen! They shouldn't have allowed him back in the UK. Why waste tax payer's money on court hearing and holiday of a prison break at the pleasure of hard working people. No doubt he will be cliaming all sorts of benefits when released.
Some people are so presumptuous!

Mr Ali was born in England and has lived here his entire life. He has never claimed benefits and part owns a very successful business. He was visiting India to partake in a family member's wedding. He has also been devastated by what has happened and feels deep remorse for the whole ordeal.

I know all this as I know him through business association and have come to know him quite well over the years. He is a fairly quiet, hardworking, unassuming person that has sadly made a terrible mistake, and is reeling from the effects of this tragedy as much as every one else involved.

Hold your tongue next time you spout completely unfounded comments towards a situation you know little about, based on nothing more than him having a non traditionally English name and family in India, it is borderline racism. There are two sides to every coin.
And your point being? Anyhow, you seem to know alot about this Ali geezer, think your more than his business associate. Had this happened in India! Your lot would have slaughtered him. Lucky for Mr Ali his living in a democratic society. Finally, makes no difference where and how he was born, his still a immigrant. Second class citizen with first class privileges.
Shut up you Nazi. Yes, a crime was committed and Mr Ali should be punished accordingly but there is no need for this 'his still a immigrant. Second class citizen with first class privileges.' You are the total opposite of what being British is about. Such a shame.
[quote][p][bold]ikap22[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Personperson[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]ikap22[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]The Seagull has landed[/bold] wrote: Very noble of Mr Parkinson. What a thorough decent gentleman. I hope Mr Ali receives both the maximum custodial sentence available and the maximum driving disqualification period available.[/p][/quote]We all know that's not going to happen! They shouldn't have allowed him back in the UK. Why waste tax payer's money on court hearing and holiday of a prison break at the pleasure of hard working people. No doubt he will be cliaming all sorts of benefits when released.[/p][/quote]Some people are so presumptuous! Mr Ali was born in England and has lived here his entire life. He has never claimed benefits and part owns a very successful business. He was visiting India to partake in a family member's wedding. He has also been devastated by what has happened and feels deep remorse for the whole ordeal. I know all this as I know him through business association and have come to know him quite well over the years. He is a fairly quiet, hardworking, unassuming person that has sadly made a terrible mistake, and is reeling from the effects of this tragedy as much as every one else involved. Hold your tongue next time you spout completely unfounded comments towards a situation you know little about, based on nothing more than him having a non traditionally English name and family in India, it is borderline racism. There are two sides to every coin.[/p][/quote]And your point being? Anyhow, you seem to know alot about this Ali geezer, think your more than his business associate. Had this happened in India! Your lot would have slaughtered him. Lucky for Mr Ali his living in a democratic society. Finally, makes no difference where and how he was born, his still a immigrant. Second class citizen with first class privileges.[/p][/quote]Shut up you Nazi. Yes, a crime was committed and Mr Ali should be punished accordingly but there is no need for this 'his still a immigrant. Second class citizen with first class privileges.' You are the total opposite of what being British is about. Such a shame. Lancashire123
  • Score: 0

7:26am Fri 11 Jul 14

Lancashire123 says...

ikap22 wrote:
Darwen Malc wrote:
Ikap22 - Quote 'Finally, makes no difference where and how he was born, his still a immigrant'.
Colour or heritage doesn't make you an immigrant! How can you be an immigrant if you were born here? Please explain, I would love to read your cohesive and reasoned argument.
To me his a immigrant. Hope that answers your question.
'he's'
[quote][p][bold]ikap22[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Darwen Malc[/bold] wrote: Ikap22 - Quote 'Finally, makes no difference where and how he was born, his still a immigrant'. Colour or heritage doesn't make you an immigrant! How can you be an immigrant if you were born here? Please explain, I would love to read your cohesive and reasoned argument.[/p][/quote]To me his a immigrant. Hope that answers your question.[/p][/quote]'he's' Lancashire123
  • Score: 3
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