Lancashire TelegraphBurnley free school will move onto business park (From Lancashire Telegraph)

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Burnley free school will move onto business park

Lancashire Telegraph: Elizabeth Haddock Elizabeth Haddock

A CONTROVERSIAL free school is to set up their base on a business park for the first year.

Park Hill Business Centre has been chosen as the short-term site for Burnley High School.

Local businesses and contractors will be hired to turn the business centre on Padiham Road into a short-term base for the new high school, which will open in September.

Green spaces around the facility will be fenced off and used for sports facilties.

An on-site former staff kitchen is to be turned into a kitchen for pupils and teachers.

Elizabeth Haddock, the school's executive principal, has experience of establishing schools in temporary sites, being part of the team which started Atherton Community School in Atherton Town Hall.

She said: “As a short-term location, the business centre will be more than adequate for the needs of the school in the first year.

“I’m very pleased with it - it is clean and modern with lots of green spaces surrounding us. While we have just the one year group it will be a good site, and actually enhance our close-knit family ethos.”

New guidelines state that buildings chosen by the Department for Education for use as state-maintained schools can be used for one academic year.

The DfE has now rubber stamped the plan and sent notification to Burnley Council, negating the need for planning permsision.

Planned work includes partitions to separate existing floor areas, provision of new male female WCs, changes to fire exit doors and to create a new pupil entrance.

Local contractors will also be hired to supply temporary free-standing kitchen units for re-heat and serving purposes.

New fencing and school signage will also be erected at the site.

Russell Rook, chief executive of Chapel St, the organisation behind the school, said: “It’s great news that Park Hill Business Centre has been confirmed as the temporary site.

“I'd like to thank those who have supported the opening of the new secondary school for their determination to see a secondary school established in Burnley in which we can have confidence and pride.”

The permanent site for the new Burnley High School is still said to be the former Habergham High School, Byron Street, Burnley where work will begin later this year.

Comments (5)

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4:15pm Sun 8 Jun 14

wilddog says...

Who is paying for this? Hope it aint me!
Who is paying for this? Hope it aint me! wilddog
  • Score: 14

9:35am Tue 10 Jun 14

DaveBurnley says...

wilddog wrote:
Who is paying for this? Hope it aint me!
Under the regime of the world's greatest education expert i.e. Michael Gove, these schools are given grants which come out of the general funds. So any money that they get means less for the mainstream schools.
[quote][p][bold]wilddog[/bold] wrote: Who is paying for this? Hope it aint me![/p][/quote]Under the regime of the world's greatest education expert i.e. Michael Gove, these schools are given grants which come out of the general funds. So any money that they get means less for the mainstream schools. DaveBurnley
  • Score: 1

9:48pm Wed 11 Jun 14

kettle72 says...

Were they belong.
Were they belong. kettle72
  • Score: 2

3:06pm Sat 14 Jun 14

R Waring says...

I attended most of the "consultation" meetings and the proposers were adamant that this school would open in a school building unlike their Atherton School, however, it seems that they can't even do this.

Free schools are independent schools with state funding provided by DfE. So yes, you are paying for it. The process of setting up a free school is not open to public scrutiny, despite being funded by public money. Free schools can be set up in any type of building, including disused shops, hospitals and offices. The government is looking to lighten the burden of school building and premises regulations, suggesting the quality of the teaching and learning environment is of little importance.

Serious financial management and governance concerns highlighted in two investigations by the Education Funding Agency to date, at Al-Madinah and Kings Science Academy, highlight the risks in some schools. (NAO 2103)

Margaret Hodge, chair of the public accounts committee, said that the NAO report showed that the DfE had failed to get a grip on the costs of the programme. "The £6.6m setup cost per school is double what the department expected, and the department had to spend £27m on temporary premises so that children were able to start school in September. It has also paid almost £27 million above its valuations for half the land and property it has purchased.

"Over £1bn will have been spent on the free schools programme by March 2014, yet on opening, 1 in 4 desks at free schools were empty and fewer than 1 in 5 secondary places are in areas of high or severe need. Whether that is the best way of spending taxpayers' money is a matter for debate. (The Guardian, Wednesday 11 December 2013)
I attended most of the "consultation" meetings and the proposers were adamant that this school would open in a school building unlike their Atherton School, however, it seems that they can't even do this. Free schools are independent schools with state funding provided by DfE. So yes, you are paying for it. The process of setting up a free school is not open to public scrutiny, despite being funded by public money. Free schools can be set up in any type of building, including disused shops, hospitals and offices. The government is looking to lighten the burden of school building and premises regulations, suggesting the quality of the teaching and learning environment is of little importance. Serious financial management and governance concerns highlighted in two investigations by the Education Funding Agency to date, at Al-Madinah and Kings Science Academy, highlight the risks in some schools. (NAO 2103) Margaret Hodge, chair of the public accounts committee, said that the NAO report showed that the DfE had failed to get a grip on the costs of the programme. "The £6.6m setup cost per school is double what the department expected, and the department had to spend £27m on temporary premises so that children were able to start school in September. It has also paid almost £27 million above its valuations for half the land and property it has purchased. "Over £1bn will have been spent on the free schools programme by March 2014, yet on opening, 1 in 4 desks at free schools were empty and fewer than 1 in 5 secondary places are in areas of high or severe need. Whether that is the best way of spending taxpayers' money is a matter for debate. (The Guardian, Wednesday 11 December 2013) R Waring
  • Score: 4

4:56pm Sun 15 Jun 14

public eye says...

Everyone knows that this school is driven by a small group of extremist fundamentalist Christians (every other mainstream Christian church locally has opposed it) and is designed to attract racist white parents. That taxpayers money is being wasted on such dangerous nonsense - money that will be stolen from other local schools - is a disgrace.
Everyone knows that this school is driven by a small group of extremist fundamentalist Christians (every other mainstream Christian church locally has opposed it) and is designed to attract racist white parents. That taxpayers money is being wasted on such dangerous nonsense - money that will be stolen from other local schools - is a disgrace. public eye
  • Score: 0

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