Stolen Asian heritage gold from Blackburn recovered by police

Stolen Asian heritage gold from Blackburn recovered by police

Stolen Asian heritage gold from Blackburn recovered by police

Stolen Asian heritage gold from Blackburn recovered by police

Stolen Asian heritage gold from Blackburn recovered by police

First published in News
Last updated

ASIAN heritage gold thought to have been stolen from homes in East Lancashire has been recovered by police.

Officers have released images of the jewellery, which includes decorative earrings, bangles, an ingot and a pendant, in a bid to reunite them with their owners.

The items, which are worth thousands of pounds, were found at a jewellers in Blackpool after a man tried to sell them.

But Det Insp Eric Halford, from Lancashire police’s target team, said it was believed the gold had been taken in burglaries at homes in Blackburn or in the Pennine area of Lancashire.

He said: “We cannot pinpoint where the jewellery may have come from and we are hoping when somebody sees the pictures, it will jog their memory straight away.

“The jewellery is quite distinctive and it is often very sentimental. It is given for weddings and it probably means a lot to somebody.”

The earrings which were recovered are plain gold in design and the pendant has green and red coloured gems.

 

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There are also two gold bangles. Those items are all 22 carat gold and thought to be worth £580 to £650.

The 24 carat ingot is valued between £2,500 and £3,000, Blackburn councillor Parwaiz Akhtar said it was likely the jewellery would be very sentimental.

He said: “Usually it is custom and tradition when a son or daughter gets married to give gold, although it is different in everybody’s family.

“In some cases, the jewellery has been passed down from generation to generation and it would be very high carat gold.

“To have it stolen would not be a very nice thing to go through and hopefully this jewellery will be reunited with whoever it belongs to.”

Det Insp Halford also encouraged residents not to keep high value items in their homes, but to put them in a bank or community safety deposit box.

A 23-year-old man from Blackpool has been arrested on suspicion of fraud by false representation and is on police bail.

Anybody with information about a burglary or who recognises any of the items should call 101 or 01254 353985.

Comments (8)

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9:40pm Thu 20 Feb 14

Old Alzheimer says...

Surely such high value (monetary or sentimental) goods would be reported as stolen and be on record with the Police, or am I not on message in my dotage?
Surely such high value (monetary or sentimental) goods would be reported as stolen and be on record with the Police, or am I not on message in my dotage? Old Alzheimer
  • Score: 6

10:27pm Thu 20 Feb 14

It's a spade! says...

There's been 2 cases in the last couple of weeks. One on Blackburn Road in Accrington and the other from Rossendale Road in Burnley.
There's been 2 cases in the last couple of weeks. One on Blackburn Road in Accrington and the other from Rossendale Road in Burnley. It's a spade!
  • Score: 2

11:47pm Thu 20 Feb 14

Graham Hartley says...

Old Alzheimer wrote:
Surely such high value (monetary or sentimental) goods would be reported as stolen and be on record with the Police, or am I not on message in my dotage?
Yes, and this fellow in his dotage expects that high-value belongings would have been photographed so that the images could be given to authority figures. Goodness, the means to make such images is ubiquitous - innit.
[quote][p][bold]Old Alzheimer[/bold] wrote: Surely such high value (monetary or sentimental) goods would be reported as stolen and be on record with the Police, or am I not on message in my dotage?[/p][/quote]Yes, and this fellow in his dotage expects that high-value belongings would have been photographed so that the images could be given to authority figures. Goodness, the means to make such images is ubiquitous - innit. Graham Hartley
  • Score: 1

12:32am Fri 21 Feb 14

woolywords says...

In spite of what Insp Halford states above, many banks are withdrawing from offering safety deposit boxes now, so if anyone wants to take advantage of this niche opportunity, am sure that there will be many that would appreciate it.
In answer to some previous comments..
Many of these items are both unique and rare, some being handed down through many generations, as either inheritance or dowry and as such, may not have the words in any language, to be best described. You only have to look at some of the items on display in Asian jewellery shop windows, to realise that you simply lack the superlatives to describe them, accurately.
It's a complete shame that neither the police nor LT are willing to show any photos of these items, in order to restore them to rightful owners, due to the restrictions in rules of evidence.
How many of us have bothered to take photos of our most treasured possessions, I wonder. Not many, I'd have thought, as we never conceive of them ever being stolen.
There is going to be an huge problem in restoring these items, as many are gifted and as such, won't have receipts of sale, nor be listed as high value items on insurance policies. The best hope being that someone was photographed, wearing the item in the past and even then, it's fraught with problems of many kinds.
A positive nightmare awaits some poor Mr, Mrs or Ms Plod, adding to that song, A Copper's lot, is not an happy one..
In spite of what Insp Halford states above, many banks are withdrawing from offering safety deposit boxes now, so if anyone wants to take advantage of this niche opportunity, am sure that there will be many that would appreciate it. In answer to some previous comments.. Many of these items are both unique and rare, some being handed down through many generations, as either inheritance or dowry and as such, may not have the words in any language, to be best described. You only have to look at some of the items on display in Asian jewellery shop windows, to realise that you simply lack the superlatives to describe them, accurately. It's a complete shame that neither the police nor LT are willing to show any photos of these items, in order to restore them to rightful owners, due to the restrictions in rules of evidence. How many of us have bothered to take photos of our most treasured possessions, I wonder. Not many, I'd have thought, as we never conceive of them ever being stolen. There is going to be an huge problem in restoring these items, as many are gifted and as such, won't have receipts of sale, nor be listed as high value items on insurance policies. The best hope being that someone was photographed, wearing the item in the past and even then, it's fraught with problems of many kinds. A positive nightmare awaits some poor Mr, Mrs or Ms Plod, adding to that song, A Copper's lot, is not an happy one.. woolywords
  • Score: 3

1:03am Fri 21 Feb 14

mrcool says...

Whenever we read about these types of items stolen, the usual suspects on here bleat on about how it is a scam or insurance fiddle. I take it they will be eating plenty of humble pie.
Whenever we read about these types of items stolen, the usual suspects on here bleat on about how it is a scam or insurance fiddle. I take it they will be eating plenty of humble pie. mrcool
  • Score: 3

1:15am Fri 21 Feb 14

wrinkles says...

I'm surprised the items were recovered so congratulations to the jeweller and police. Who on earth keeps a receipt for an heirloom?
I'm surprised the items were recovered so congratulations to the jeweller and police. Who on earth keeps a receipt for an heirloom? wrinkles
  • Score: 9

8:54am Fri 21 Feb 14

Copperhead says...

Asian Heritage Gold - how to say " we wanted to hide money from the taxman so we bought gold items we could claim were family heirlooms " in only 3 words.
Asian Heritage Gold - how to say " we wanted to hide money from the taxman so we bought gold items we could claim were family heirlooms " in only 3 words. Copperhead
  • Score: -6

12:56pm Fri 21 Feb 14

mmickk says...

wrinkles wrote:
I'm surprised the items were recovered so congratulations to the jeweller and police. Who on earth keeps a receipt for an heirloom?
There is no need and it is used umpteen times a day the cameraphone . And thanks to this I have just taken photos of all my goods in every room you would think insurance companies would encourage you to do so. I must admit I have scanned copies of receipts. I just hope this person serves a very long time most people never recover from these crimes ultimately having to move home scum of the earth should have a GPS tag for the rest of there lives.
[quote][p][bold]wrinkles[/bold] wrote: I'm surprised the items were recovered so congratulations to the jeweller and police. Who on earth keeps a receipt for an heirloom?[/p][/quote]There is no need and it is used umpteen times a day the cameraphone . And thanks to this I have just taken photos of all my goods in every room you would think insurance companies would encourage you to do so. I must admit I have scanned copies of receipts. I just hope this person serves a very long time most people never recover from these crimes ultimately having to move home scum of the earth should have a GPS tag for the rest of there lives. mmickk
  • Score: 3

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