Old Blackburn market demolished to make way for redevelopment

BOROUGH regeneration boss Maureen Bateson checks on the demolition of Blackburn’s old market buildings as the stage is set for the latest stage of the redevelopment of the town centre.

Work started two weeks ago on knocking down the three-day sales hall, and now she can see the cleared site on which a temporary bus station will rise in August. Demolition of the remainder of the former market premises will then start, preparing the way for building a new £5million bus station in October.

Once that is completed, work on the £28million Cathedral Quarter will start, and the existing Boulevard bus station will shut.

Coun Bateson said: “The three day market is almost down completely and then work will start of the six day market. Once complete, work will then commence on the interim bus station. We will continue to keep the public informed on all changes to bus services. An information stall will be opened shortly in the new market adjacent to the tourist information stall.”

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12:02pm Thu 27 Jun 13

Noiticer says...

At the time the 'new' markst was opened in 1964 there was great optimism in the town and the market's opening represented what was to be a new era with the shopping precinct about to be started. It was state of the art and represented the modern era. Alas, like so many buildings of its time it soon dated and, as shopping habits changed with the coming of the supermarkets in the late 1970's, it began to lose its customer base. At the same time the town's industrial foundations of textiles, engineering and paper were in steady decline and the town's social and cultural cohesion was soon to be undermined. To-day Blackburn is a sad, socially divided town lacking a vision for the future which it had in the 1960's and the strong civic pride it had back in the 60's has gone. What is Blackburn's future in a country which has also lost its way and only knows the cost of everything and the value of very little?
At the time the 'new' markst was opened in 1964 there was great optimism in the town and the market's opening represented what was to be a new era with the shopping precinct about to be started. It was state of the art and represented the modern era. Alas, like so many buildings of its time it soon dated and, as shopping habits changed with the coming of the supermarkets in the late 1970's, it began to lose its customer base. At the same time the town's industrial foundations of textiles, engineering and paper were in steady decline and the town's social and cultural cohesion was soon to be undermined. To-day Blackburn is a sad, socially divided town lacking a vision for the future which it had in the 1960's and the strong civic pride it had back in the 60's has gone. What is Blackburn's future in a country which has also lost its way and only knows the cost of everything and the value of very little? Noiticer

12:44pm Thu 27 Jun 13

hasslem hasslem says...

Noiticer wrote:
At the time the 'new' markst was opened in 1964 there was great optimism in the town and the market's opening represented what was to be a new era with the shopping precinct about to be started. It was state of the art and represented the modern era. Alas, like so many buildings of its time it soon dated and, as shopping habits changed with the coming of the supermarkets in the late 1970's, it began to lose its customer base. At the same time the town's industrial foundations of textiles, engineering and paper were in steady decline and the town's social and cultural cohesion was soon to be undermined. To-day Blackburn is a sad, socially divided town lacking a vision for the future which it had in the 1960's and the strong civic pride it had back in the 60's has gone. What is Blackburn's future in a country which has also lost its way and only knows the cost of everything and the value of very little?
i was happy in the haze of a drunken hour.....
[quote][p][bold]Noiticer[/bold] wrote: At the time the 'new' markst was opened in 1964 there was great optimism in the town and the market's opening represented what was to be a new era with the shopping precinct about to be started. It was state of the art and represented the modern era. Alas, like so many buildings of its time it soon dated and, as shopping habits changed with the coming of the supermarkets in the late 1970's, it began to lose its customer base. At the same time the town's industrial foundations of textiles, engineering and paper were in steady decline and the town's social and cultural cohesion was soon to be undermined. To-day Blackburn is a sad, socially divided town lacking a vision for the future which it had in the 1960's and the strong civic pride it had back in the 60's has gone. What is Blackburn's future in a country which has also lost its way and only knows the cost of everything and the value of very little?[/p][/quote]i was happy in the haze of a drunken hour..... hasslem hasslem

9:32pm Thu 27 Jun 13

noddy57 says...

l remember the first time l went into the market hall,,it seemed so futuristic and l was really impressed by the ultra modern look,,how time just moves so quickly,,old Blackburn town just aint the same old place,,much of this old cotton towns classic architecture was lost to us all in the 60s,,such a waste,
l remember the first time l went into the market hall,,it seemed so futuristic and l was really impressed by the ultra modern look,,how time just moves so quickly,,old Blackburn town just aint the same old place,,much of this old cotton towns classic architecture was lost to us all in the 60s,,such a waste, noddy57

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