Accrington pupils praised for record GCSE results

Lancashire Telegraph: Haroon Hussain, now at Edgehill University, Victoria Britland, now in sixth form, Emily Haire, now at Liverpool University, and Jack Hambley, now in sixth form Haroon Hussain, now at Edgehill University, Victoria Britland, now in sixth form, Emily Haire, now at Liverpool University, and Jack Hambley, now in sixth form

STAFF at Accrington Academy congratulated pupils on their best-ever GCSE results.

During his opening speech, at the academy’s annual prizegiving night, principal Andrew O’Brien praised pup- ils for their hard work and commitment.

He said: “This summer saw our best-ever GCSE, AS-level and A-level results, and we wanted to bring together everyone who helped cont-ribute to this success.

“We are proud of each and every one of our students, and there are some out- standing personal triumphs to celebrate from the past year at the academy.

“At Accrington Academy we really push for the best in everyone. This awards evening truly demonstrates that this can be achieved,” he added.

The guest speaker, at the Queens Road West school, was local businessman Ilyas Khan, who is also chairman of Leonard Cheshire Disability, a British charity that supports, and cares, for disabled people.

Awards included:

  • Special recognition in art: Zeba Jahangir, Katarzyna Pekal, Sylvia Waddington
  • Special recognition for outstanding achievements: Year 11 - Pasha Baker, Ishrat Bashir, Laura French, Anna-Louise Gregson, Jack Hambley, Grace Hickson, Ben Jackson, Katarzyna Pekal, Sylvia Waddington; Year 12 - Brett Arbuary, Stephen O’Mara, Scarlett Parry, Hardeep Sidhu, Keely Watson; Year 13 -  Charlotte Britland, Emily Haire, Shafia Idris, Anisha Kausar, Elliot Neil.

Comments (3)

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9:39pm Fri 21 Dec 12

Graham Hartley says...

Is it so far out of the question to expect innovation in the reporting of achievement in schools? Here, another head praises pupils for what they have done at school; acquiring new skills and knowledge. Perhaps the ubiquitously dull reporting is a consequence of the hackneyed remarks from heads on these occasions.
Is it so far out of the question to expect innovation in the reporting of achievement in schools? Here, another head praises pupils for what they have done at school; acquiring new skills and knowledge. Perhaps the ubiquitously dull reporting is a consequence of the hackneyed remarks from heads on these occasions. Graham Hartley

6:34pm Sat 22 Dec 12

Iftikhar says...

Multiculturalism is not about integration but about cultural plurality. It is not about separation but about respect and the deepening awareness of Unity in Diversity. Each culture will maintain its own intrinsic value and at the same time would be expected to contribute to the benefit of the whole society. Multiculturalism can accommodate diversity of all kinds – cultural, philosophical and religious – so that we can create a world without conflict and strife. Britain can assume the role of accommodation and concern for all peoples, for our planet and indeed for our survival. Multi-culturalism is even more important and crucial after 9/11 and 7/7. Muslim youths are also likely to feel alienated by a focus on shared Brutishness, rather than multicultural diversity. Rather than promoting a single British “us” teaching should acknowledge that “us” can be diverse and plural. Children should be encouraged to explore differences in appearance, history and religion to reduce social and educational fears. The pressures of multi-culturalism, racism, bullying and Islamophobia have forced the Muslim community to set up their own schools.There are hundreds of state and church schools where Muslim pupils are in majority. In my opinion all such schools may be opted out as Muslim Academies with bilingual Muslim teachers as role models. Such schools will be able to satisfy the needs and demands of the Muslim children and their parents.
Multiculturalism is not about integration but about cultural plurality. It is not about separation but about respect and the deepening awareness of Unity in Diversity. Each culture will maintain its own intrinsic value and at the same time would be expected to contribute to the benefit of the whole society. Multiculturalism can accommodate diversity of all kinds – cultural, philosophical and religious – so that we can create a world without conflict and strife. Britain can assume the role of accommodation and concern for all peoples, for our planet and indeed for our survival. Multi-culturalism is even more important and crucial after 9/11 and 7/7. Muslim youths are also likely to feel alienated by a focus on shared Brutishness, rather than multicultural diversity. Rather than promoting a single British “us” teaching should acknowledge that “us” can be diverse and plural. Children should be encouraged to explore differences in appearance, history and religion to reduce social and educational fears. The pressures of multi-culturalism, racism, bullying and Islamophobia have forced the Muslim community to set up their own schools.There are hundreds of state and church schools where Muslim pupils are in majority. In my opinion all such schools may be opted out as Muslim Academies with bilingual Muslim teachers as role models. Such schools will be able to satisfy the needs and demands of the Muslim children and their parents. Iftikhar

8:15pm Sat 22 Dec 12

liddle 'un says...

Iftikhar wrote:
Multiculturalism is not about integration but about cultural plurality. It is not about separation but about respect and the deepening awareness of Unity in Diversity. Each culture will maintain its own intrinsic value and at the same time would be expected to contribute to the benefit of the whole society. Multiculturalism can accommodate diversity of all kinds – cultural, philosophical and religious – so that we can create a world without conflict and strife. Britain can assume the role of accommodation and concern for all peoples, for our planet and indeed for our survival. Multi-culturalism is even more important and crucial after 9/11 and 7/7. Muslim youths are also likely to feel alienated by a focus on shared Brutishness, rather than multicultural diversity. Rather than promoting a single British “us” teaching should acknowledge that “us” can be diverse and plural. Children should be encouraged to explore differences in appearance, history and religion to reduce social and educational fears. The pressures of multi-culturalism, racism, bullying and Islamophobia have forced the Muslim community to set up their own schools.There are hundreds of state and church schools where Muslim pupils are in majority. In my opinion all such schools may be opted out as Muslim Academies with bilingual Muslim teachers as role models. Such schools will be able to satisfy the needs and demands of the Muslim children and their parents.
Zzzzz
[quote][p][bold]Iftikhar[/bold] wrote: Multiculturalism is not about integration but about cultural plurality. It is not about separation but about respect and the deepening awareness of Unity in Diversity. Each culture will maintain its own intrinsic value and at the same time would be expected to contribute to the benefit of the whole society. Multiculturalism can accommodate diversity of all kinds – cultural, philosophical and religious – so that we can create a world without conflict and strife. Britain can assume the role of accommodation and concern for all peoples, for our planet and indeed for our survival. Multi-culturalism is even more important and crucial after 9/11 and 7/7. Muslim youths are also likely to feel alienated by a focus on shared Brutishness, rather than multicultural diversity. Rather than promoting a single British “us” teaching should acknowledge that “us” can be diverse and plural. Children should be encouraged to explore differences in appearance, history and religion to reduce social and educational fears. The pressures of multi-culturalism, racism, bullying and Islamophobia have forced the Muslim community to set up their own schools.There are hundreds of state and church schools where Muslim pupils are in majority. In my opinion all such schools may be opted out as Muslim Academies with bilingual Muslim teachers as role models. Such schools will be able to satisfy the needs and demands of the Muslim children and their parents.[/p][/quote]Zzzzz liddle 'un

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