Castlerigg walk

Castlerigg walk

Castlerigg walk

First published in Walks in the Lake District Lancashire Telegraph: Photograph of the Author by

Pass through a metal gate leading directly to the Stone Circle.

Castlerigg is 4,000 years old and inspired John Keats (1795-1821) to write his epic poem, Hyperion.

The 38 stones make up a 100ft ring, with a further 10 stones constituting a second ring overlooked by the looming bulk of Saddleback Mountain.

So named because of its shape, the circle is an inspiration to us all as it was to the young Keats.

From the circle return to the minor road and turn right to Goosewell Farm. A footpath signed right indicates “The Nest”.

Follow the obvious footpath through four fields and pass through a gate at High Nest.

The public footpath follows the drive with the house on the left.

Cross a cattle grid and turn left into a field passing Lun Nest.

The path widens and then crosses two footbridges over tributaries of the Naddle Beck. Follow well-marked footpaths towards St John’s-in-the-Vale Church.

The route here is steep but short and not difficult. Sykes Farm is on the left of the track. Pass through a gate leading to a narrow road. Turn left to the youth centre and the church.

St John’s Church dates only from 1845 but this still remote and atmospheric site has been a place of Christian worship from at least 1554. In the churchyard is a holy spring which was probably used by health-concious pilgrims from Celtic times. The church is usually open and is a delightful place to sit and think about everything which is good in this hectic world.

Return to the church gate and look for a slit stile almost immediately opposite.

Follow the very obvious footpath signed to Tenet ( or Tewit) Tarn.

Tuit is the old name for the lapwing, which still breeds in the damp fields close to the pretty tarn.

At the tarn, Skiddaw mountain can be seen to the left and Saddleback to the right. Before reaching the tarn cross a stile and keep the water to the left.

Turn right at a finger post and descend a grassy track leading to a narrow lane. Here is Goosewell Farm. Turn left here and return to the stone circle.’ Pass through a metal gate leading directly to the Stone Circle.

Castlerigg is 4,000 years old and inspired John Keats (1795-1821) to write his epic poem- Hyperion.

The 38 stones make up a 100ft ring, with a further 10 stones constituting a second ring overlooked by the looming bulk of Saddleback Mountain.

So named because of its shape, the circle is an inspiration to us all as it was to the young Keats.

From the circle return to the minor road and turn right to Goosewell Farm. A footpath signed right indicates “The Nest”.

Follow the obvious footpath through four fields and pass through a gate at High Nest. The public footpath follows the drive with the house on the left. Cross a cattle grid and turn left into a field passing Lun Nest.

The path widens and then crosses two footbridges over tributaries of the Naddle Beck. Follow well-marked footpaths towards St John’s-in-the-Vale Church. The route here is steep but short and not difficult. Sykes Farm is on the left of the track. Pass through a gate leading to a narrow road. Turn left to the youth centre and the church.

St John’s Church dates only from 1845 but this still remote and atmospheric site has been a place of Christian worship from at least 1554. In the churchyard is a holy spring which was probably used by health-concious pilgrims from Celtic times. The church is usually open and is a delightful place to sit and think about everything which is good in this hectic world.

Return to the church gate and look for a slit stile almost immediately opposite. Follow the very obvious footpath signed to Tenet ( or Tewit) Tarn.

Tuit is the old name for the lapwing, which still breeds in the damp fields close to the pretty tarn.

At the tarn, Skiddaw mountain can be seen to the left and Saddleback to the right.

Before reaching the tarn cross a stile and keep the water to the left.

Turn right at a finger post and descend a grassy track leading to a narrow lane.

Here is Goosewell Farm. Turn left here and return to the stone circle.’

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