Lancashire TelegraphEast Lancashire communities to be given £100k incentive on fracking (From Lancashire Telegraph)

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East Lancashire communities to be given £100k incentive on fracking

Lancashire Telegraph: A fracking drill A fracking drill

FRACKING firm Cuadrilla yesterday announced Lancashire communities where it drills for shale gas will get £100,000 each to spend on local projects.

The new deal came as Prime Minister David Cameron said local councils would also receive all the business rates from shale gas schemes rather than half.

French oil giant Total also revealed plans to invest about £30m in fracking in Lincolnshire, the first major energy company to invest in fracking in the UK.

Greenpeace accused the government of ‘bribery’ and said Cuadrilla’s announcement could foreshadow plans to frack in the East of Lancashire as well as the West.

In June the British Geological Survey revealed significant shale gas resources under the M65 corridor across Hyndburn, Burnley, Pendle and Rossendale.

Cuadrilla has agreed with Accington-based Community Foundation for Lancashire to run a pilot scheme offering community benefit funds at shale gas exploration sites in the county.

A ‘good neighbour’ payment of £100,000 will be made for each exploration wellhead where hydraulic fracturing takes place.

Mr Cameron said: “We're going all-out for shale. It will mean more jobs and opportunities for people, and economic security for our country."

Energy Minister Michael Fallon said: "We want local councils and local people to benefit from this exploration. We expect 20 to 40 wells to be drilled in exploration over the next couple of years and I think it's very important that local communities see some of the benefit."

Whitehall officials said the business rates commitment could mean up to £1.7m extra a year for councils affected.

Lawrence Carter from Greenpeace said: “The government is now resorting to straight up bribery. Cuadrilla’s announcement is an indication they are now looking at drilling in the East of Lancashire as well as the West.”

Pendle peer Tony Greaves said: “The government is clearly worried it may not get planning permission to frack. This is an incentive to councils to approve drilling applications.”

Rossendale council leader Alyson Barnes said: “I think it is good that local councils and service could benefit from fracking but any applications must be shown to be safe and sensible before they are approved. ”

Comments (22)

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7:40pm Mon 13 Jan 14

Michael@ClitheroeSince58 says...

I can't believe how low Cameron can go. Brown envelopes abandoned, lets just go for outright bribery.
I can't believe how low Cameron can go. Brown envelopes abandoned, lets just go for outright bribery. Michael@ClitheroeSince58
  • Score: 13

7:51pm Mon 13 Jan 14

Just an observer says...

Why don't they frack in the houses of parliament? plenty of excess gas in there.
Why don't they frack in the houses of parliament? plenty of excess gas in there. Just an observer
  • Score: 18

8:26pm Mon 13 Jan 14

mavrick says...

Bribery is just the start, I wonder which councils will be offered the most, Labour or Conservative.? given the swingeing cuts to local authority budgets it is like bribing you with your own money. I wonder how many of the Tories friends will already have licences? I hope Alison Baynes does not have a say on any planning application from the fracking companies, She has already indicated which way she would like to vote. I heard Davey boy on the TV saying fracking would create 74,000 jobs. I would like him to show where and how this amount of employment would be created? or just another Tory delusion.
Bribery is just the start, I wonder which councils will be offered the most, Labour or Conservative.? given the swingeing cuts to local authority budgets it is like bribing you with your own money. I wonder how many of the Tories friends will already have licences? I hope Alison Baynes does not have a say on any planning application from the fracking companies, She has already indicated which way she would like to vote. I heard Davey boy on the TV saying fracking would create 74,000 jobs. I would like him to show where and how this amount of employment would be created? or just another Tory delusion. mavrick
  • Score: 11

8:35pm Mon 13 Jan 14

Michael@ClitheroeSince58 says...

mavrick wrote:
Bribery is just the start, I wonder which councils will be offered the most, Labour or Conservative.? given the swingeing cuts to local authority budgets it is like bribing you with your own money. I wonder how many of the Tories friends will already have licences? I hope Alison Baynes does not have a say on any planning application from the fracking companies, She has already indicated which way she would like to vote. I heard Davey boy on the TV saying fracking would create 74,000 jobs. I would like him to show where and how this amount of employment would be created? or just another Tory delusion.
Some very good points maverick +1
[quote][p][bold]mavrick[/bold] wrote: Bribery is just the start, I wonder which councils will be offered the most, Labour or Conservative.? given the swingeing cuts to local authority budgets it is like bribing you with your own money. I wonder how many of the Tories friends will already have licences? I hope Alison Baynes does not have a say on any planning application from the fracking companies, She has already indicated which way she would like to vote. I heard Davey boy on the TV saying fracking would create 74,000 jobs. I would like him to show where and how this amount of employment would be created? or just another Tory delusion.[/p][/quote]Some very good points maverick +1 Michael@ClitheroeSince58
  • Score: 8

8:35pm Mon 13 Jan 14

happycyclist says...

A good test for our councillors. Which I expect most of them to fail.
A good test for our councillors. Which I expect most of them to fail. happycyclist
  • Score: 11

8:42pm Mon 13 Jan 14

Michael@ClitheroeSince58 says...

A better idea would be to start burning coal and coke again and put 70,000 miners back to work hahaha I can't believe what a total shambles this government has become.
A better idea would be to start burning coal and coke again and put 70,000 miners back to work hahaha I can't believe what a total shambles this government has become. Michael@ClitheroeSince58
  • Score: 8

8:56pm Mon 13 Jan 14

Jack Herer says...

Here's a true story; in the early 80's, AMOCO drilled for oil in a field just off the Witton Weavers Way, past Abbey Village going out towards Bolton. Geological surveys with those big shaking trucks (remember them?) had shown favourable results, and so there was a full on proper exploration affair for a few years - big rig, the lot. They didn't tap any oil though. I'm guessing in hindsight they couldn't go deep enough with the technology of the age.

Now, less than 30 years later however, you would have great difficulty in finding any evidence whatsoever that anyone with more than even a tractor had ever been in that field.

We need to face facts as a country. The energy which overwhelming heats and powers our homes comes from risk ridden overseas sources. There is no magic, perfect answer to our energy needs - not with the way we clearly want to live our lives as a society.

More often than not, the evidence against fracking is full of sensationalist scaremongering. We need to be realistic and realise that, whilst it isn't perfect, fracking is actually relatively safe. More importantly, there are no better, viable alternatives for Britain. Not one with such potential prosperity. Especially for us in the north.

That's just the cold hard truth, however much we'd wish that there was some magic wand, perfect alternative.
Here's a true story; in the early 80's, AMOCO drilled for oil in a field just off the Witton Weavers Way, past Abbey Village going out towards Bolton. Geological surveys with those big shaking trucks (remember them?) had shown favourable results, and so there was a full on proper exploration affair for a few years - big rig, the lot. They didn't tap any oil though. I'm guessing in hindsight they couldn't go deep enough with the technology of the age. Now, less than 30 years later however, you would have great difficulty in finding any evidence whatsoever that anyone with more than even a tractor had ever been in that field. We need to face facts as a country. The energy which overwhelming heats and powers our homes comes from risk ridden overseas sources. There is no magic, perfect answer to our energy needs - not with the way we clearly want to live our lives as a society. More often than not, the evidence against fracking is full of sensationalist scaremongering. We need to be realistic and realise that, whilst it isn't perfect, fracking is actually relatively safe. More importantly, there are no better, viable alternatives for Britain. Not one with such potential prosperity. Especially for us in the north. That's just the cold hard truth, however much we'd wish that there was some magic wand, perfect alternative. Jack Herer
  • Score: 2

8:57pm Mon 13 Jan 14

louderfasterlonger says...

Cuadrila.. owned 42% Australia 42% Anglo American. Total... owned 100% France. Local community... £1 per head for each Well and 1% of revenue. United utilities and absent Gentry who own most of east lancashire. How much will they make. Seems we're getting very little to watch our beautiful countryside raped and polluted. A few locals may get a low grade job but lets face it.. the high quality jobs needing expertise will be filled from over the Atlantic.
Cuadrila.. owned 42% Australia 42% Anglo American. Total... owned 100% France. Local community... £1 per head for each Well and 1% of revenue. United utilities and absent Gentry who own most of east lancashire. How much will they make. Seems we're getting very little to watch our beautiful countryside raped and polluted. A few locals may get a low grade job but lets face it.. the high quality jobs needing expertise will be filled from over the Atlantic. louderfasterlonger
  • Score: 11

9:01pm Mon 13 Jan 14

It's a spade! says...

Apparently there is a huge reserve just been found under the village of Chipping Norton.

Interesting that mining should be mentioned, as no one has yet asked how will the old mine workings stand up to the hydraulic fracturing process. Potential collapses followed by subsidence topside. House insurance costs could rocket.
Apparently there is a huge reserve just been found under the village of Chipping Norton. Interesting that mining should be mentioned, as no one has yet asked how will the old mine workings stand up to the hydraulic fracturing process. Potential collapses followed by subsidence topside. House insurance costs could rocket. It's a spade!
  • Score: 6

9:03pm Mon 13 Jan 14

Jack Herer says...

mavrick wrote:
Bribery is just the start, I wonder which councils will be offered the most, Labour or Conservative.? given the swingeing cuts to local authority budgets it is like bribing you with your own money. I wonder how many of the Tories friends will already have licences? I hope Alison Baynes does not have a say on any planning application from the fracking companies, She has already indicated which way she would like to vote. I heard Davey boy on the TV saying fracking would create 74,000 jobs. I would like him to show where and how this amount of employment would be created? or just another Tory delusion.
And the alternative?

Reliance on risky overseas supply for our energy?

Is that Labour's magic plan to somehow make Britain stronger?

Whether you like it or not, I'm guessing that Labour themselves will have to face facts on this one. Why not email Labour headquarters and find out their position on fracking?

This isn't some Tory scheme to toast evil - much as you like to paint everything in such a fantastical way - it is simply having to face the reality of the best energy supply for Britain.
[quote][p][bold]mavrick[/bold] wrote: Bribery is just the start, I wonder which councils will be offered the most, Labour or Conservative.? given the swingeing cuts to local authority budgets it is like bribing you with your own money. I wonder how many of the Tories friends will already have licences? I hope Alison Baynes does not have a say on any planning application from the fracking companies, She has already indicated which way she would like to vote. I heard Davey boy on the TV saying fracking would create 74,000 jobs. I would like him to show where and how this amount of employment would be created? or just another Tory delusion.[/p][/quote]And the alternative? Reliance on risky overseas supply for our energy? Is that Labour's magic plan to somehow make Britain stronger? Whether you like it or not, I'm guessing that Labour themselves will have to face facts on this one. Why not email Labour headquarters and find out their position on fracking? This isn't some Tory scheme to toast evil - much as you like to paint everything in such a fantastical way - it is simply having to face the reality of the best energy supply for Britain. Jack Herer
  • Score: 3

9:17pm Mon 13 Jan 14

Jack Herer says...

louderfasterlonger wrote:
Cuadrila.. owned 42% Australia 42% Anglo American. Total... owned 100% France. Local community... £1 per head for each Well and 1% of revenue. United utilities and absent Gentry who own most of east lancashire. How much will they make. Seems we're getting very little to watch our beautiful countryside raped and polluted. A few locals may get a low grade job but lets face it.. the high quality jobs needing expertise will be filled from over the Atlantic.
Even in the U.S,, the high grade jobs are often filled with us Brits.

If you know any suitable British firms who could do this, then you need to write to them and tell them to stand up and be counted.

No-one is stopping British firms being involved.

If this initial exploration work is successful, then there will undoubtedly be many British firms who will benefit, and greatly.

Many, many British workers will also benefit. With high grade jobs too. Pretending they won't is denying the reality of all similar sectors.

Go and visit that field near Abbey Village to see how major energy exploration looks afterwards. You'll have serious trouble finding which one it is.
[quote][p][bold]louderfasterlonger[/bold] wrote: Cuadrila.. owned 42% Australia 42% Anglo American. Total... owned 100% France. Local community... £1 per head for each Well and 1% of revenue. United utilities and absent Gentry who own most of east lancashire. How much will they make. Seems we're getting very little to watch our beautiful countryside raped and polluted. A few locals may get a low grade job but lets face it.. the high quality jobs needing expertise will be filled from over the Atlantic.[/p][/quote]Even in the U.S,, the high grade jobs are often filled with us Brits. If you know any suitable British firms who could do this, then you need to write to them and tell them to stand up and be counted. No-one is stopping British firms being involved. If this initial exploration work is successful, then there will undoubtedly be many British firms who will benefit, and greatly. Many, many British workers will also benefit. With high grade jobs too. Pretending they won't is denying the reality of all similar sectors. Go and visit that field near Abbey Village to see how major energy exploration looks afterwards. You'll have serious trouble finding which one it is. Jack Herer
  • Score: 0

9:22pm Mon 13 Jan 14

A Darener says...

It's time for fracking, let's get cracking!
It's time for fracking, let's get cracking! A Darener
  • Score: -2

9:50pm Mon 13 Jan 14

louderfasterlonger says...

Methane from fracking - 30% more harmful to the atmosphere than coal and 20 - 50% more harmful than natural gas. Around 7-8% is burnt off during the fracking process. We had a great number of natural resources in the 70s which were either closed down prematurely or sold off in the 80s. I get the point that there may be few British Companies with the know-how to frack. This is why I see the tax incentives given to these companies by David Cameron as trully staggering. The evidence of polution from fracking in the US is growing daily. And that comes from a country that likes to turn a blind eye to recording breaches in regulations.
We are about to see the land invaded in a way not seen for over 100 years followed by mains water shortages and pollution scares.
Methane from fracking - 30% more harmful to the atmosphere than coal and 20 - 50% more harmful than natural gas. Around 7-8% is burnt off during the fracking process. We had a great number of natural resources in the 70s which were either closed down prematurely or sold off in the 80s. I get the point that there may be few British Companies with the know-how to frack. This is why I see the tax incentives given to these companies by David Cameron as trully staggering. The evidence of polution from fracking in the US is growing daily. And that comes from a country that likes to turn a blind eye to recording breaches in regulations. We are about to see the land invaded in a way not seen for over 100 years followed by mains water shortages and pollution scares. louderfasterlonger
  • Score: 9

10:18pm Mon 13 Jan 14

michaelbusch says...

They wanted to start fracking here over in germany as well, but the people were and are against it - but the politicians still avoid to make it illegal.
We want to keep our water clean and fresh.
Hope you do not agree to fracking.
They wanted to start fracking here over in germany as well, but the people were and are against it - but the politicians still avoid to make it illegal. We want to keep our water clean and fresh. Hope you do not agree to fracking. michaelbusch
  • Score: 7

10:39pm Mon 13 Jan 14

Malthus says...

Jack Herer wrote:
Here's a true story; in the early 80's, AMOCO drilled for oil in a field just off the Witton Weavers Way, past Abbey Village going out towards Bolton. Geological surveys with those big shaking trucks (remember them?) had shown favourable results, and so there was a full on proper exploration affair for a few years - big rig, the lot. They didn't tap any oil though. I'm guessing in hindsight they couldn't go deep enough with the technology of the age.

Now, less than 30 years later however, you would have great difficulty in finding any evidence whatsoever that anyone with more than even a tractor had ever been in that field.

We need to face facts as a country. The energy which overwhelming heats and powers our homes comes from risk ridden overseas sources. There is no magic, perfect answer to our energy needs - not with the way we clearly want to live our lives as a society.

More often than not, the evidence against fracking is full of sensationalist scaremongering. We need to be realistic and realise that, whilst it isn't perfect, fracking is actually relatively safe. More importantly, there are no better, viable alternatives for Britain. Not one with such potential prosperity. Especially for us in the north.

That's just the cold hard truth, however much we'd wish that there was some magic wand, perfect alternative.
You may be right Jack Herer. However, from the comments that have been posted as a result of this article it appears to me that people are not condemning fracking per se, they are questioning the methods that politicians are using to justify or accelerate the inevitable mass exploitation of what is still a questionable resource. As other posters have pointed out, gone are the days of under the counter brown envelopes, it now seems that "cash incentives" for approval of drilling sites can be approved in advance via well publicised payments such as we see in this article. I am curious though, if a fracking resource were found to be under the Shangri la that is Chipping Norton would the PM still be so inclined as to exploit the fracking potential of that area. I really do think not. What do you think Jack?
[quote][p][bold]Jack Herer[/bold] wrote: Here's a true story; in the early 80's, AMOCO drilled for oil in a field just off the Witton Weavers Way, past Abbey Village going out towards Bolton. Geological surveys with those big shaking trucks (remember them?) had shown favourable results, and so there was a full on proper exploration affair for a few years - big rig, the lot. They didn't tap any oil though. I'm guessing in hindsight they couldn't go deep enough with the technology of the age. Now, less than 30 years later however, you would have great difficulty in finding any evidence whatsoever that anyone with more than even a tractor had ever been in that field. We need to face facts as a country. The energy which overwhelming heats and powers our homes comes from risk ridden overseas sources. There is no magic, perfect answer to our energy needs - not with the way we clearly want to live our lives as a society. More often than not, the evidence against fracking is full of sensationalist scaremongering. We need to be realistic and realise that, whilst it isn't perfect, fracking is actually relatively safe. More importantly, there are no better, viable alternatives for Britain. Not one with such potential prosperity. Especially for us in the north. That's just the cold hard truth, however much we'd wish that there was some magic wand, perfect alternative.[/p][/quote]You may be right Jack Herer. However, from the comments that have been posted as a result of this article it appears to me that people are not condemning fracking per se, they are questioning the methods that politicians are using to justify or accelerate the inevitable mass exploitation of what is still a questionable resource. As other posters have pointed out, gone are the days of under the counter brown envelopes, it now seems that "cash incentives" for approval of drilling sites can be approved in advance via well publicised payments such as we see in this article. I am curious though, if a fracking resource were found to be under the Shangri la that is Chipping Norton would the PM still be so inclined as to exploit the fracking potential of that area. I really do think not. What do you think Jack? Malthus
  • Score: 3

11:28pm Mon 13 Jan 14

noddy57 says...

sheer and unadulterated bribery bordering on criminality,,who else would get away with this apart from politicians in Perticular the Tories, shame on this government,
sheer and unadulterated bribery bordering on criminality,,who else would get away with this apart from politicians in Perticular the Tories, shame on this government, noddy57
  • Score: 4

12:40am Tue 14 Jan 14

AussieRailMan says...

Well, I hope some of this extra cash from the fracking goes in to suitable transport projects, like the Colne to Skipton Rail Line, of which was promised by a few within Lancashire County Council.
Well, I hope some of this extra cash from the fracking goes in to suitable transport projects, like the Colne to Skipton Rail Line, of which was promised by a few within Lancashire County Council. AussieRailMan
  • Score: 5

8:36am Tue 14 Jan 14

DaveBurnley says...

Jack Herer wrote:
Here's a true story; in the early 80's, AMOCO drilled for oil in a field just off the Witton Weavers Way, past Abbey Village going out towards Bolton. Geological surveys with those big shaking trucks (remember them?) had shown favourable results, and so there was a full on proper exploration affair for a few years - big rig, the lot. They didn't tap any oil though. I'm guessing in hindsight they couldn't go deep enough with the technology of the age.

Now, less than 30 years later however, you would have great difficulty in finding any evidence whatsoever that anyone with more than even a tractor had ever been in that field.

We need to face facts as a country. The energy which overwhelming heats and powers our homes comes from risk ridden overseas sources. There is no magic, perfect answer to our energy needs - not with the way we clearly want to live our lives as a society.

More often than not, the evidence against fracking is full of sensationalist scaremongering. We need to be realistic and realise that, whilst it isn't perfect, fracking is actually relatively safe. More importantly, there are no better, viable alternatives for Britain. Not one with such potential prosperity. Especially for us in the north.

That's just the cold hard truth, however much we'd wish that there was some magic wand, perfect alternative.
Unfortunately the fracking is unlikely to be done with a safety and environment first policy. It will be profit driven and who can guess what corners will be cut?

If there are any accidents and we end up with contaminated groundwater, who will suffer? Certainly not the companies or politicians, they don't live round here. It will be the ordinary people who stand to get a few crumbs from the profits, at the risk of having their local area irreparably damaged for all time.
[quote][p][bold]Jack Herer[/bold] wrote: Here's a true story; in the early 80's, AMOCO drilled for oil in a field just off the Witton Weavers Way, past Abbey Village going out towards Bolton. Geological surveys with those big shaking trucks (remember them?) had shown favourable results, and so there was a full on proper exploration affair for a few years - big rig, the lot. They didn't tap any oil though. I'm guessing in hindsight they couldn't go deep enough with the technology of the age. Now, less than 30 years later however, you would have great difficulty in finding any evidence whatsoever that anyone with more than even a tractor had ever been in that field. We need to face facts as a country. The energy which overwhelming heats and powers our homes comes from risk ridden overseas sources. There is no magic, perfect answer to our energy needs - not with the way we clearly want to live our lives as a society. More often than not, the evidence against fracking is full of sensationalist scaremongering. We need to be realistic and realise that, whilst it isn't perfect, fracking is actually relatively safe. More importantly, there are no better, viable alternatives for Britain. Not one with such potential prosperity. Especially for us in the north. That's just the cold hard truth, however much we'd wish that there was some magic wand, perfect alternative.[/p][/quote]Unfortunately the fracking is unlikely to be done with a safety and environment first policy. It will be profit driven and who can guess what corners will be cut? If there are any accidents and we end up with contaminated groundwater, who will suffer? Certainly not the companies or politicians, they don't live round here. It will be the ordinary people who stand to get a few crumbs from the profits, at the risk of having their local area irreparably damaged for all time. DaveBurnley
  • Score: 2

2:16pm Tue 14 Jan 14

juanbbien says...

The Government when letting vat off for charity causes or making donations to this, that and the other make it sound like its their money and the people lap it up,no its our money and the Government allegedly work for us as I understand it
The Government when letting vat off for charity causes or making donations to this, that and the other make it sound like its their money and the people lap it up,no its our money and the Government allegedly work for us as I understand it juanbbien
  • Score: 1

1:59pm Wed 15 Jan 14

Jakester05 says...

Fracking – Is there any need with our new, low cost oil & gas exploration technology?

A little known junior oil company, Alumni Oil, has developed a new and unique set of oil/ gas exploration technologies that are proving highly effective at a fraction of the traditional exploration cost. Combining these technologies with a high power algorithm they have developed, they are finding large quantities of oil and gas, right across the globe, easily and effortlessly, at a minimum of the traditional cost!

So, when oil and gas, of which there is plenty all across the globe still undetected, can be found so easily – is there really any need for taking huge environmental risks in our own back yards by endorsing fracking?

Alumni are an ethical and environmentally focussed energy company – their corporate vision is to use the “mucky black stuff” (of which they are sitting on a multi-billion barrel basin via their subsidiary www.AfricaNewEnergie
s.com) to self-fund a clean energy installation program for developing countries around the world. They have already identified potentially large deposits in over 40 developing countries worldwide, in which they will start focussing their efforts over the next few years, once Namibia comes on tap and starts producing.

With the minimum investments starting at just £10,000, investors can even invest via the Enterprise Investment Scheme (EIS), so you not only get something back from Mr. Cameron (i.e. 30% tax refunds), just for investing, but you can also sell your investment CGT FREE, so long as you remain invested for the EIS minimum period of 3 years. If you are interested in investing and wish to find out more about Alumni’s current projects, and understand why fracking is simply not necessary, click here: or go to http://www.youtube.c
om/watch?v=AWFqnbs8Q
-0
Fracking – Is there any need with our new, low cost oil & gas exploration technology? A little known junior oil company, Alumni Oil, has developed a new and unique set of oil/ gas exploration technologies that are proving highly effective at a fraction of the traditional exploration cost. Combining these technologies with a high power algorithm they have developed, they are finding large quantities of oil and gas, right across the globe, easily and effortlessly, at a minimum of the traditional cost! So, when oil and gas, of which there is plenty all across the globe still undetected, can be found so easily – is there really any need for taking huge environmental risks in our own back yards by endorsing fracking? Alumni are an ethical and environmentally focussed energy company – their corporate vision is to use the “mucky black stuff” (of which they are sitting on a multi-billion barrel basin via their subsidiary www.AfricaNewEnergie s.com) to self-fund a clean energy installation program for developing countries around the world. They have already identified potentially large deposits in over 40 developing countries worldwide, in which they will start focussing their efforts over the next few years, once Namibia comes on tap and starts producing. With the minimum investments starting at just £10,000, investors can even invest via the Enterprise Investment Scheme (EIS), so you not only get something back from Mr. Cameron (i.e. 30% tax refunds), just for investing, but you can also sell your investment CGT FREE, so long as you remain invested for the EIS minimum period of 3 years. If you are interested in investing and wish to find out more about Alumni’s current projects, and understand why fracking is simply not necessary, click here: or go to http://www.youtube.c om/watch?v=AWFqnbs8Q -0 Jakester05
  • Score: 0

3:55pm Wed 15 Jan 14

A Darener says...

It is all well and good finding gas and oil around the globe. But only that which is found in Britain is British. We need to be self sufficient in energy to have any independence from future threats to our security. Wind, solar and hydro offer some independence but all have their downside. The oil giants are not going to give up their industries without a fight so the best thing is to make sure any form of extraction is safe and environmentally friendly.
It is all well and good finding gas and oil around the globe. But only that which is found in Britain is British. We need to be self sufficient in energy to have any independence from future threats to our security. Wind, solar and hydro offer some independence but all have their downside. The oil giants are not going to give up their industries without a fight so the best thing is to make sure any form of extraction is safe and environmentally friendly. A Darener
  • Score: 0

3:57pm Wed 15 Jan 14

A Darener says...

Ps I was also going to say the cleanest most efficient generation of energy is Nuclear, so the sooner we build new nuclear power stations the better.
Ps I was also going to say the cleanest most efficient generation of energy is Nuclear, so the sooner we build new nuclear power stations the better. A Darener
  • Score: 0

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